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Southern red-fronted brown lemur - male closeup, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar Here&#039;s some shots of a species extremely common to see in Kirindy, the (Southern)Red-fronted brown lemur. These diurnal species are active and loud as they move through the dry forest and not shy of people at all. They are fun to watch and hear, as they make a pig-like grunt noise. <br />
<br />
Brown lemurs, its (sub)species and many common names lead to a lot of confusion in species identification, therefore I&#039;d like to give some guidance:<br />
<br />
The Brown lemur (Eulemur fulvus) can be considered the historic species complex. It used to lump together several sub species that now have become full species. Today, Eulemur fulvus is a species with a specific appearance and distribution. You can recognize it by its relatively dull appearance, both the male and female have a largely dark face:<br />
<a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/1531/common_brown_lemur.html" rel="nofollow">https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/1531/common_brown_lemur.html</a><br />
<br />
The red-fronted lemur used to be considered a sub species of brown lemur yet in 2001, it got full species status as Eulemur rufus. It was easy to distinguish from the Brown Lemur for the males have a rufous crown. <br />
<br />
Then in 2008, Eulemur rufus was further split into 2 seperate species:<br />
- Eulemur rufus, with common names: Red lemur, Rufous brown lemur<br />
- Eulemur rufifrons, with common names: Red-fronted lemur, Red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
If you look at the pile of common names:<br />
<br />
- Brown Lemur<br />
- Common Brown Lemur<br />
- Red Lemur<br />
- Rufous Brown Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Brown Lemur<br />
<br />
...it&#039;s easy to get confused. Even more so when even guides use these common names very casually, they may even still call a red-fronted lemur a brown lemur. The solution is to be explicit as possible:<br />
<br />
Eulemur rufus - Northern red-fronted lemur<br />
Eulemur rufifrons - Southern red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
The two species having a red front can largely be dinstinguished by distribution. In most cases, you can look up the site/park where you spotted it and find information on which one occurs there, as they don&#039;t really overlap in the wild. <br />
<br />
In non-wild spottings it may be harder to tell the difference. The only difference I&#039;m aware of is that the male of Eulemur rufus has a slightly more vibrant (orange) crown compared to Eulemur rufifrons, yet it&#039;s probably best to ask locally which one it is.<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83084/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_female_-_2_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html" title="Southern red-fronted brown lemur - female - 2, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/83084_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1569456010&Signature=FXr5YZXCpsgHaiNIkh1PxAjuADQ%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Southern red-fronted brown lemur - female - 2, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar Here&#039;s some shots of a species extremely common to see in Kirindy, the (Southern)Red-fronted brown lemur. These diurnal species are active and loud as they move through the dry forest and not shy of people at all. They are fun to watch and hear, as they make a pig-like grunt noise. <br />
<br />
Brown lemurs, its (sub)species and many common names lead to a lot of confusion in species identification, therefore I&#039;d like to give some guidance:<br />
<br />
The Brown lemur (Eulemur fulvus) can be considered the historic species complex. It used to lump together several sub species that now have become full species. Today, Eulemur fulvus is a species with a specific appearance and distribution. You can recognize it by its relatively dull appearance, both the male and female have a largely dark face:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/1531/common_brown_lemur.html<br />
<br />
The red-fronted lemur used to be considered a sub species of brown lemur yet in 2001, it got full species status as Eulemur rufus. It was easy to distinguish from the Brown Lemur for the males have a rufous crown. <br />
<br />
Then in 2008, Eulemur rufus was further split into 2 seperate species:<br />
- Eulemur rufus, with common names: Red lemur, Rufous brown lemur<br />
- Eulemur rufifrons, with common names: Red-fronted lemur, Red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
If you look at the pile of common names:<br />
<br />
- Brown Lemur<br />
- Common Brown Lemur<br />
- Red Lemur<br />
- Rufous Brown Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Brown Lemur<br />
<br />
...it&#039;s easy to get confused. Even more so when even guides use these common names very casually, they may even still call a red-fronted lemur a brown lemur. The solution is to be explicit as possible:<br />
<br />
Eulemur rufus - Northern red-fronted lemur<br />
Eulemur rufifrons - Southern red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
The two species having a red front can largely be dinstinguished by distribution. In most cases, you can look up the site/park where you spotted it and find information on which one occurs there, as they don&#039;t really overlap in the wild. <br />
<br />
In non-wild spottings it may be harder to tell the difference. The only difference I&#039;m aware of is that the male of Eulemur rufus has a slightly more vibrant (orange) crown compared to Eulemur rufifrons, yet it&#039;s probably best to ask locally which one it is.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83085/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_female_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83086/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83087/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_closeup_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html Africa,Eulemur rufifrons,Geotagged,Kirindy Reserve,Madagascar,Madagascar 2019,Southern red-fronted brown lemur,Winter,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83085/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_female_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html" title="Southern red-fronted brown lemur - female, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/83085_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1569456010&Signature=BMDlAQxZYW132seFpuq9BmISFig%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Southern red-fronted brown lemur - female, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar Here&#039;s some shots of a species extremely common to see in Kirindy, the (Southern)Red-fronted brown lemur. These diurnal species are active and loud as they move through the dry forest and not shy of people at all. They are fun to watch and hear, as they make a pig-like grunt noise. <br />
<br />
Brown lemurs, its (sub)species and many common names lead to a lot of confusion in species identification, therefore I&#039;d like to give some guidance:<br />
<br />
The Brown lemur (Eulemur fulvus) can be considered the historic species complex. It used to lump together several sub species that now have become full species. Today, Eulemur fulvus is a species with a specific appearance and distribution. You can recognize it by its relatively dull appearance, both the male and female have a largely dark face:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/1531/common_brown_lemur.html<br />
<br />
The red-fronted lemur used to be considered a sub species of brown lemur yet in 2001, it got full species status as Eulemur rufus. It was easy to distinguish from the Brown Lemur for the males have a rufous crown. <br />
<br />
Then in 2008, Eulemur rufus was further split into 2 seperate species:<br />
- Eulemur rufus, with common names: Red lemur, Rufous brown lemur<br />
- Eulemur rufifrons, with common names: Red-fronted lemur, Red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
If you look at the pile of common names:<br />
<br />
- Brown Lemur<br />
- Common Brown Lemur<br />
- Red Lemur<br />
- Rufous Brown Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Brown Lemur<br />
<br />
...it&#039;s easy to get confused. Even more so when even guides use these common names very casually, they may even still call a red-fronted lemur a brown lemur. The solution is to be explicit as possible:<br />
<br />
Eulemur rufus - Northern red-fronted lemur<br />
Eulemur rufifrons - Southern red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
The two species having a red front can largely be dinstinguished by distribution. In most cases, you can look up the site/park where you spotted it and find information on which one occurs there, as they don&#039;t really overlap in the wild. <br />
<br />
In non-wild spottings it may be harder to tell the difference. The only difference I&#039;m aware of is that the male of Eulemur rufus has a slightly more vibrant (orange) crown compared to Eulemur rufifrons, yet it&#039;s probably best to ask locally which one it is.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83084/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_female_-_2_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83086/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83087/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_closeup_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html Africa,Eulemur rufifrons,Kirindy Reserve,Madagascar,Madagascar 2019,Southern red-fronted brown lemur,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83086/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html" title="Southern red-fronted brown lemur - male, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/83086_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1569456010&Signature=KW7E3gv2V07DqXJrXGugrKu52xs%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Southern red-fronted brown lemur - male, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar Here&#039;s some shots of a species extremely common to see in Kirindy, the (Southern)Red-fronted brown lemur. These diurnal species are active and loud as they move through the dry forest and not shy of people at all. They are fun to watch and hear, as they make a pig-like grunt noise. <br />
<br />
Brown lemurs, its (sub)species and many common names lead to a lot of confusion in species identification, therefore I&#039;d like to give some guidance:<br />
<br />
The Brown lemur (Eulemur fulvus) can be considered the historic species complex. It used to lump together several sub species that now have become full species. Today, Eulemur fulvus is a species with a specific appearance and distribution. You can recognize it by its relatively dull appearance, both the male and female have a largely dark face:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/1531/common_brown_lemur.html<br />
<br />
The red-fronted lemur used to be considered a sub species of brown lemur yet in 2001, it got full species status as Eulemur rufus. It was easy to distinguish from the Brown Lemur for the males have a rufous crown. <br />
<br />
Then in 2008, Eulemur rufus was further split into 2 seperate species:<br />
- Eulemur rufus, with common names: Red lemur, Rufous brown lemur<br />
- Eulemur rufifrons, with common names: Red-fronted lemur, Red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
If you look at the pile of common names:<br />
<br />
- Brown Lemur<br />
- Common Brown Lemur<br />
- Red Lemur<br />
- Rufous Brown Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Brown Lemur<br />
<br />
...it&#039;s easy to get confused. Even more so when even guides use these common names very casually, they may even still call a red-fronted lemur a brown lemur. The solution is to be explicit as possible:<br />
<br />
Eulemur rufus - Northern red-fronted lemur<br />
Eulemur rufifrons - Southern red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
The two species having a red front can largely be dinstinguished by distribution. In most cases, you can look up the site/park where you spotted it and find information on which one occurs there, as they don&#039;t really overlap in the wild. <br />
<br />
In non-wild spottings it may be harder to tell the difference. The only difference I&#039;m aware of is that the male of Eulemur rufus has a slightly more vibrant (orange) crown compared to Eulemur rufifrons, yet it&#039;s probably best to ask locally which one it is.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83084/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_female_-_2_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83085/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_female_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83087/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_closeup_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html Africa,Eulemur rufifrons,Geotagged,Kirindy Reserve,Madagascar,Madagascar 2019,Southern red-fronted brown lemur,Winter,World" /></a></figure> Africa,Eulemur rufifrons,Geotagged,Kirindy Reserve,Madagascar,Madagascar 2019,Southern red-fronted brown lemur,Winter,World Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Southern red-fronted brown lemur - male closeup, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar

Here's some shots of a species extremely common to see in Kirindy, the (Southern)Red-fronted brown lemur. These diurnal species are active and loud as they move through the dry forest and not shy of people at all. They are fun to watch and hear, as they make a pig-like grunt noise.

Brown lemurs, its (sub)species and many common names lead to a lot of confusion in species identification, therefore I'd like to give some guidance:

The Brown lemur (Eulemur fulvus) can be considered the historic species complex. It used to lump together several sub species that now have become full species. Today, Eulemur fulvus is a species with a specific appearance and distribution. You can recognize it by its relatively dull appearance, both the male and female have a largely dark face:
https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/1531/common_brown_lemur.html

The red-fronted lemur used to be considered a sub species of brown lemur yet in 2001, it got full species status as Eulemur rufus. It was easy to distinguish from the Brown Lemur for the males have a rufous crown.

Then in 2008, Eulemur rufus was further split into 2 seperate species:
- Eulemur rufus, with common names: Red lemur, Rufous brown lemur
- Eulemur rufifrons, with common names: Red-fronted lemur, Red-fronted brown lemur

If you look at the pile of common names:

- Brown Lemur
- Common Brown Lemur
- Red Lemur
- Rufous Brown Lemur
- Red-fronted Lemur
- Red-fronted Brown Lemur

...it's easy to get confused. Even more so when even guides use these common names very casually, they may even still call a red-fronted lemur a brown lemur. The solution is to be explicit as possible:

Eulemur rufus - Northern red-fronted lemur
Eulemur rufifrons - Southern red-fronted brown lemur

The two species having a red front can largely be dinstinguished by distribution. In most cases, you can look up the site/park where you spotted it and find information on which one occurs there, as they don't really overlap in the wild.

In non-wild spottings it may be harder to tell the difference. The only difference I'm aware of is that the male of Eulemur rufus has a slightly more vibrant (orange) crown compared to Eulemur rufifrons, yet it's probably best to ask locally which one it is.

Southern red-fronted brown lemur - female - 2, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar Here's some shots of a species extremely common to see in Kirindy, the (Southern)Red-fronted brown lemur. These diurnal species are active and loud as they move through the dry forest and not shy of people at all. They are fun to watch and hear, as they make a pig-like grunt noise. <br />
<br />
Brown lemurs, its (sub)species and many common names lead to a lot of confusion in species identification, therefore I'd like to give some guidance:<br />
<br />
The Brown lemur (Eulemur fulvus) can be considered the historic species complex. It used to lump together several sub species that now have become full species. Today, Eulemur fulvus is a species with a specific appearance and distribution. You can recognize it by its relatively dull appearance, both the male and female have a largely dark face:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/1531/common_brown_lemur.html<br />
<br />
The red-fronted lemur used to be considered a sub species of brown lemur yet in 2001, it got full species status as Eulemur rufus. It was easy to distinguish from the Brown Lemur for the males have a rufous crown. <br />
<br />
Then in 2008, Eulemur rufus was further split into 2 seperate species:<br />
- Eulemur rufus, with common names: Red lemur, Rufous brown lemur<br />
- Eulemur rufifrons, with common names: Red-fronted lemur, Red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
If you look at the pile of common names:<br />
<br />
- Brown Lemur<br />
- Common Brown Lemur<br />
- Red Lemur<br />
- Rufous Brown Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Brown Lemur<br />
<br />
...it's easy to get confused. Even more so when even guides use these common names very casually, they may even still call a red-fronted lemur a brown lemur. The solution is to be explicit as possible:<br />
<br />
Eulemur rufus - Northern red-fronted lemur<br />
Eulemur rufifrons - Southern red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
The two species having a red front can largely be dinstinguished by distribution. In most cases, you can look up the site/park where you spotted it and find information on which one occurs there, as they don't really overlap in the wild. <br />
<br />
In non-wild spottings it may be harder to tell the difference. The only difference I'm aware of is that the male of Eulemur rufus has a slightly more vibrant (orange) crown compared to Eulemur rufifrons, yet it's probably best to ask locally which one it is.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83085/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_female_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83086/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83087/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_closeup_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html Africa,Eulemur rufifrons,Geotagged,Kirindy Reserve,Madagascar,Madagascar 2019,Southern red-fronted brown lemur,Winter,World

Southern red-fronted brown lemur - female, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar Here's some shots of a species extremely common to see in Kirindy, the (Southern)Red-fronted brown lemur. These diurnal species are active and loud as they move through the dry forest and not shy of people at all. They are fun to watch and hear, as they make a pig-like grunt noise. <br />
<br />
Brown lemurs, its (sub)species and many common names lead to a lot of confusion in species identification, therefore I'd like to give some guidance:<br />
<br />
The Brown lemur (Eulemur fulvus) can be considered the historic species complex. It used to lump together several sub species that now have become full species. Today, Eulemur fulvus is a species with a specific appearance and distribution. You can recognize it by its relatively dull appearance, both the male and female have a largely dark face:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/1531/common_brown_lemur.html<br />
<br />
The red-fronted lemur used to be considered a sub species of brown lemur yet in 2001, it got full species status as Eulemur rufus. It was easy to distinguish from the Brown Lemur for the males have a rufous crown. <br />
<br />
Then in 2008, Eulemur rufus was further split into 2 seperate species:<br />
- Eulemur rufus, with common names: Red lemur, Rufous brown lemur<br />
- Eulemur rufifrons, with common names: Red-fronted lemur, Red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
If you look at the pile of common names:<br />
<br />
- Brown Lemur<br />
- Common Brown Lemur<br />
- Red Lemur<br />
- Rufous Brown Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Brown Lemur<br />
<br />
...it's easy to get confused. Even more so when even guides use these common names very casually, they may even still call a red-fronted lemur a brown lemur. The solution is to be explicit as possible:<br />
<br />
Eulemur rufus - Northern red-fronted lemur<br />
Eulemur rufifrons - Southern red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
The two species having a red front can largely be dinstinguished by distribution. In most cases, you can look up the site/park where you spotted it and find information on which one occurs there, as they don't really overlap in the wild. <br />
<br />
In non-wild spottings it may be harder to tell the difference. The only difference I'm aware of is that the male of Eulemur rufus has a slightly more vibrant (orange) crown compared to Eulemur rufifrons, yet it's probably best to ask locally which one it is.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83084/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_female_-_2_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83086/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83087/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_closeup_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html Africa,Eulemur rufifrons,Kirindy Reserve,Madagascar,Madagascar 2019,Southern red-fronted brown lemur,World

Southern red-fronted brown lemur - male, Kirindy Reserve, Madagascar Here's some shots of a species extremely common to see in Kirindy, the (Southern)Red-fronted brown lemur. These diurnal species are active and loud as they move through the dry forest and not shy of people at all. They are fun to watch and hear, as they make a pig-like grunt noise. <br />
<br />
Brown lemurs, its (sub)species and many common names lead to a lot of confusion in species identification, therefore I'd like to give some guidance:<br />
<br />
The Brown lemur (Eulemur fulvus) can be considered the historic species complex. It used to lump together several sub species that now have become full species. Today, Eulemur fulvus is a species with a specific appearance and distribution. You can recognize it by its relatively dull appearance, both the male and female have a largely dark face:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/1531/common_brown_lemur.html<br />
<br />
The red-fronted lemur used to be considered a sub species of brown lemur yet in 2001, it got full species status as Eulemur rufus. It was easy to distinguish from the Brown Lemur for the males have a rufous crown. <br />
<br />
Then in 2008, Eulemur rufus was further split into 2 seperate species:<br />
- Eulemur rufus, with common names: Red lemur, Rufous brown lemur<br />
- Eulemur rufifrons, with common names: Red-fronted lemur, Red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
If you look at the pile of common names:<br />
<br />
- Brown Lemur<br />
- Common Brown Lemur<br />
- Red Lemur<br />
- Rufous Brown Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Lemur<br />
- Red-fronted Brown Lemur<br />
<br />
...it's easy to get confused. Even more so when even guides use these common names very casually, they may even still call a red-fronted lemur a brown lemur. The solution is to be explicit as possible:<br />
<br />
Eulemur rufus - Northern red-fronted lemur<br />
Eulemur rufifrons - Southern red-fronted brown lemur<br />
<br />
The two species having a red front can largely be dinstinguished by distribution. In most cases, you can look up the site/park where you spotted it and find information on which one occurs there, as they don't really overlap in the wild. <br />
<br />
In non-wild spottings it may be harder to tell the difference. The only difference I'm aware of is that the male of Eulemur rufus has a slightly more vibrant (orange) crown compared to Eulemur rufifrons, yet it's probably best to ask locally which one it is.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83084/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_female_-_2_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83085/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_female_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/83087/southern_red-fronted_brown_lemur_-_male_closeup_kirindy_reserve_madagascar.html Africa,Eulemur rufifrons,Geotagged,Kirindy Reserve,Madagascar,Madagascar 2019,Southern red-fronted brown lemur,Winter,World

    comments (13)

  1. I wanted to hear the pig-grunting sound, but couldn't find a video of this species alone. I did find this though:

    Posted 9 days ago
    1. Nice video, strange that they did not include the Indri! Found a video:


      You can hear some of the grunting near the end, although it is higher pitched than I normally hear it. The video poster is an idiot btw, the species isn't rare at all nor is Kirindy the only place to see it.
      Posted 9 days ago, modified 9 days ago
      1. They are so cute when they drink! Posted 9 days ago
        1. Yes, and even better is their touch. Their fur is extremely soft. Their hands super dry and grippy. And it's a surprisingly light animal, you barely feel it when it's hopping onto your head or back. Posted 9 days ago
          1. This one totally melts my heart. I think it may need a snuggle, and then to be taken away from the giggling idiots and brought back to its natural habitat. Although, if I was standing next to it, I'm sure I'd be a giggling idiot as well.

            Posted 9 days ago
            1. Don't want to ruin your mood, but probably will when I share this:
              https://www.conservation.org/blog/wild-ring-tailed-lemur-population-has-plummeted-95-since-2000
              https://phys.org/news/2016-12-ring-tailed-lemurs.html

              This "flagship" lemur species is the most screwed of them all. Everybody assumes it is doing fine (for being so famous) yet its wild population has collapsed and the few remaining still actively hunted for food.

              The only positive take is that they seem to do well in zoos and reproduce easily, so they can be reintroduced.

              As for non-wild interactions with lemurs, I too have mixed feelings about it. In particular when tourists are very loud and touchy. That said, from what I can tell having experienced a few of such non-wild encounters, it does not appear to me that the animals are suffering. Their behavior may not be entirely natural, but they are playful and non aggressive by nature, and also do not have a built-in fear of people, as people only arrived 2,000 years ago.
              Posted 9 days ago
              1. Oh, that's depressing. The "canary in a coal mine". That's good news that they seem to do well in zoos for the potential of reintroduction in the wild. But, I wonder what the consequences of that would be...are zoo-reared individuals less fit, less active, etc. How do they react in the wild when males have to compete and food is no longer delivered to them? Are there any mental illness issues caused from captivity. Posted 8 days ago
    2. Ah wait, the Collared Brown Lemur in your video is exactly the sound I mean! Almost all brown lemur species (sub species now considered main species) make this same sound. Posted 9 days ago
      1. I noticed that one sounded like a pig :). The mongoose lemur sounds like Dave when he snores. Posted 9 days ago
        1. I think we need a special code word to refer to Dave :) Posted 9 days ago
          1. Lol. I'd share my nickname for him, but it's definitely not appropriate for all audiences. Posted 9 days ago, modified 8 days ago
            1. Share it privately :) Posted 9 days ago
              1. Lol, you may regret that. Posted 8 days ago

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The red-fronted lemur, also known as the red-fronted brown lemur or southern red-fronted brown lemur, is a species of lemur from Madagascar. Until 2001, it was considered a subspecies of the common brown lemur, ''E. fulvus''. In 2001, ''E. fulvus'' was split into several separate species, including ''Eulemur rufus'', in which this species was included. In 2008, ''E. rufus'' was split into two species, the red lemur and the red-fronted lemur . ''E. rufus'' covers the population on the west coast.. more

Similar species: Primates
Species identified by fchristant
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By fchristant

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Uploaded Aug 12, 2019. Captured Jul 9, 2019 10:20 in Morondava, Madagascar.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/5.6
  • 1/200s
  • ISO80
  • 250mm