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Peppered Haimbachia Moth - Haimbachia placidellus Sorry for the bad photo, but this moth was awesome! Sadly, it was out of reach. Hopefully it will return to my light.<br />
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TL: ~15 mm. White FW that was peppered with dusky scales. Median line with a black dot at midpoint. Curved, double ST line. Hosts: unknown<br />
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Habitat: Attracted to a 395 LED light in a semi-rural area Geotagged,Haimbachia placidellus,Peppered Haimbachia Moth,Summer,United States,moth Click/tap to enlarge Species introCountry intro

Peppered Haimbachia Moth - Haimbachia placidellus

Sorry for the bad photo, but this moth was awesome! Sadly, it was out of reach. Hopefully it will return to my light.

TL: ~15 mm. White FW that was peppered with dusky scales. Median line with a black dot at midpoint. Curved, double ST line. Hosts: unknown

Habitat: Attracted to a 395 LED light in a semi-rural area

    comments (6)

  1. SO cool! :) And oh my gosh, those "fly by" moths that don't want to stay drive me crazy! A HUGE moth landed on my sheet this morning--only to flutter away within 2 seconds >_< Posted 4 months ago
    1. Haha, yes! Why do they do that! They are teasing us! Posted 4 months ago
      1. Worse are the bumpers. You have a fair set of moths on the cloth and then one with navigation issues bumps the others from the cloth. There should be laws against this. Posted 3 months ago
        1. Yes!! There are a bunch of large, clumsy moths and beetles that are classic bumpers. Posted 3 months ago
  2. Holy crap, I think I may have photographed this one this morning? Or maybe something in this genus! I'll post it once I'm done mothing this morning! Posted 4 months ago, modified 4 months ago
    1. Nice! Yours is gorgeous! Posted 4 months ago

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''Haimbachia placidellus'', the peppered haimbachia moth, is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Frank Haimbach in 1907. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from New York and Massachusetts to South Carolina, west to Tennessee.

The wingspan is about 17-18 mm. The forewings are pale tan to whitish with dark speckling. The hindwings are pale yellowish with a darker terminal line. Adults are on wing from May to July.

The larvae probably feed.. more

Similar species: Moths And Butterflies
Species identified by Christine Young
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By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jul 9, 2019. Captured Jul 8, 2019 22:36 in 5 East St, New Milford, CT 06776, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/5.6
  • 1/64s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm