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Showy Lady's Slippers The mega bloom of the Showy Lady's Slipper (Cypripedium reginae) orchid in the fen of the Purdon Conservation Area, Lanark, Ontario, Canada. Canada,Cypripedium reginae,Geotagged,Lanark,Ontario,Purdon Conservation Area,Showy Lady's Slipper,Summer,orchid Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Showy Lady's Slippers

The mega bloom of the Showy Lady's Slipper (Cypripedium reginae) orchid in the fen of the Purdon Conservation Area, Lanark, Ontario, Canada.

    comments (6)

  1. Awesome! I'm planning to search for these next year. There are a few spots not too far from me that are said to still have them. Posted 5 months ago
    1. I always love seeing these big orchids every year, we have two locations to view these beautiful flowers. Posted 5 months ago
      1. Nice!! Posted 5 months ago
  2. From today's Facebook post:

    Described as the “crowning glory of northern bogs”, the Showy Lady's Slipper (Cypripedium reginae) is native to northern North America. They have never been common, but are now rarer than ever. Lady’s slippers depend on insects for pollination, and yet the flowers don’t offer a nectar reward.

    These deceptive flowers have an unusual structure. The petals are fused together to form a hollow pouch. Lured by the flower’s color and fragrance, an insect enters the flower through a hole in the pouch. Inside the pouch, the entrance narrows, making it nearly impossible for a pollinator to exit the way it entered. To exit, the insect must climb to the top of the pouch where it brushes against the stigma and anther, thus depositing and collecting pollen. Only a small percentage of lady’s slippers are pollinated each year because insects learn not to visit them since they don’t provide a nectar reward.

    If a flower is lucky enough to get pollinated, the seeds must then wait for a specific fungus to join them in a symbiotic relationship before they can grow. This may take several years! Overall, the time from when a seed is first dispersed to the time it actually blooms may take up to 17 years! Combined with habitat loss, it’s no wonder that these beautiful orchids are rare! {Spotted in Ontario, Canada by JungleDragon user, Greg Shchepanek} #JungleDragon
    Posted 5 months ago
    1. Perfect! <3 Posted 5 months ago
      1. They are so gorgeous and are definitely on my list of flowers to find! Posted 5 months ago

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''Cypripedium reginae'', known as the showy lady's slipper, pink-and-white lady's-slipper, or the queen's lady's-slipper, is a rare terrestrial lady's-slipper orchid native to northern North America.

Despite producing a large amount of seeds per seed pod, it reproduces largely by vegetative reproduction, and remains restricted to the North East region of the United States and south east regions of Canada. Although never common, this rare plant has vanished from much of its historical.. more

Species identified by Greg Shchepanek
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By Greg Shchepanek

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Uploaded Jul 6, 2019. Captured Jun 30, 2019 16:37 in Purdon Conservation Area, Concession Rd 8, Lanark Highlands, ON K0G 1M0, Canada.
  • Canon EOS M100
  • f/4.5
  • 1/79s
  • ISO100
  • 28mm