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Juvenile Wonderpus This is a juvenile Wonderpus - Wunderpus photogenicus seen during a Black Water dive.  During this pelagic phase, they have a translucent to transparent body with bands of browns on their tentacles.  This one has a body size of around 1 cm.  At night time, they come out to hunt in the water column among small fishes and planktons.  It is a very popular subject among Underwater Macro Photographers.<br />
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 Anilao,Batangas,Octopus,Philippines,Wonderpus,Wunderpus,Wunderpus photogenicus Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Juvenile Wonderpus

This is a juvenile Wonderpus - Wunderpus photogenicus seen during a Black Water dive. During this pelagic phase, they have a translucent to transparent body with bands of browns on their tentacles. This one has a body size of around 1 cm. At night time, they come out to hunt in the water column among small fishes and planktons. It is a very popular subject among Underwater Macro Photographers.

    comments (6)

  1. "Wunderpus" is a fantastic common name! Posted 3 months ago
    1. Yes it is, Christine.
      This species was only described in the year 2006 with a new genus created for it and for now, its the only species under the genus.
      Posted 3 months ago
  2. Incredible shot! Posted 3 months ago
    1. Thanks, Ferdy :) Posted 3 months ago
  3. Today's Facebook post:

    Happy World Octopus Day! In case you didn’t know, octopuses are incredible creatures! They are super intelligent, masters of camouflage, and have numerous tricks to thwart predators. Their defensive strategies are quite brilliant. They can actually match the colors AND textures of their surroundings, thus allowing them to hide anywhere, even in plain sight. If a predator gets too close, an octopus can quickly escape by jet propulsion, or it can release a cloud of ink, which irritates the predator’s eyes and distorts its senses. Octopuses range in size from 2 cm to 5 m, yet even the large ones can fit their squishy bodies into impossibly small nooks, as long as the hole is not larger than the only hard part of their bodies, which is their beak. And, if those tactics don’t work, then an octopus can simply lose an arm to an attacker and regrow it later. No biggie.

    In addition to defense, octopuses have many other fantastically weird qualities. They have three hearts. Two hearts pump blood through the gills, while the third heart pumps it through the organs. When they are swimming, the organ heart stops beating, which as you can imagine, is exhausting. This explains why octopuses stop to rest frequently and many even seem to prefer walking to swimming. Octopuses have copper, rather than iron-based blood, which means that they have blue blood. Blue blood!

    And now comes the sad news, octopuses have tragic sex lives. In fact, reproduction is a death sentence for them. When it’s time to mate, the male either inserts his sperm into the female, or he simply hands her some sperm, which she dutifully accepts. The male then wanders off to die. Meanwhile, the female stops eating and guards her eggs until they hatch. After her babies are born, her body commits cellular suicide, which rips through her tissues and organs, thus killing her. {Wunderpus photogenicus spotted by JungleDragon moderator, Albert Kang in the Philippines} #JungleDragon
    Posted 6 days ago
  4. Wonderful! Posted 6 days ago

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''Wunderpus photogenicus'', the wunderpus octopus is a small-bodied species of octopus with distinct white and rusty brown coloration. 'Wunderpus' from German “wunder” meaning ‘marvel or wonder’. Due to the appearance and behavior of the wunderpus, it is frequently confused with its close relative, the mimic octopus. The wunderpus octopus was not discovered until the 1980s and only officially described in detail in 2006. The wunderpus octopus are important commercially to the underwater.. more

Similar species: Octopuses
Species identified by Albert Kang
View Albert Kang's profile

By Albert Kang

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jul 1, 2019. Captured May 21, 2019 21:09.
  • TG-5
  • f/6.3
  • 1/200s
  • ISO3200
  • 18mm