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Quercus macrocarpa twig Corky winged bark of Quercus macrocarpa (Bur Oak) twigs. These outgrowths help to distinguish it from the similar Quercus alba (White Oak) which has smooth twigs. This was a very small tree growing alongside a former railroad grade now turned into a recreational trail. I've noticed that many of the Bur Oaks here are small with short branches densely covered in these corky outgrowths which are very different from the typical form. Bur oak,Geotagged,Quercus alba,Quercus macrocarpa,Spring,United States,bark,trail,tree,twig,white oak Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Quercus macrocarpa twig

Corky winged bark of Quercus macrocarpa (Bur Oak) twigs. These outgrowths help to distinguish it from the similar Quercus alba (White Oak) which has smooth twigs. This was a very small tree growing alongside a former railroad grade now turned into a recreational trail. I've noticed that many of the Bur Oaks here are small with short branches densely covered in these corky outgrowths which are very different from the typical form.

    comments (9)

  1. What a beautiful branch. I've only recently learned the outgrowths are called wings. Posted 8 days ago
    1. The trees were quite spectacular with all of those winged branches. Posted 8 days ago
  2. Bur oak has super cool acorns! Posted 8 days ago
    1. And edible with minimal processing. Posted 8 days ago
      1. Nice! I wouldn’t have assumed that! Posted 8 days ago
        1. Some can be eaten right from the tree but there is a tannic acid content that could be a problem if you eat too many. The acorns can be mashed and soaked in a few changes of warm water to make a flour. I haven't tried this but have eaten bur oak acorns from the trees. Posted 7 days ago
          1. That's so cool! I had no idea. I used to eat acorns as a kid and did make flour once, but it was not an easy process. Eating a bur oak acorn straight from the tree is now on my to-do list! Posted 6 days ago
            1. Go easy on them because they do contain tannic acid although not as much as red oaks do. Posted 6 days ago
              1. Good advice, thanks! Posted 5 days ago

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''Quercus macrocarpa'', the bur oak, sometimes spelled burr oak, is a species of oak in the white oak section ''Quercus'' sect. ''Quercus'', native to North America in the eastern and central United States and eastern and central Canada. This plant is also called mossycup oak and mossycup white oak.

''Quercus macrocarpa'' is widespread in the Atlantic coastal plain from New Brunswick to North Carolina, west as far as Alberta, eastern Montana, Wyoming, and northeastern New Mexico. The.. more

Similar species: Fagales
Species identified by Gary B
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By Gary B

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Uploaded May 16, 2019. Captured May 16, 2019 11:04 in 4184 Co Rd 61, Moose Lake, MN 55767, USA.
  • SAMSUNG-SM-G930A
  • f/1.7
  • 1/5134s
  • ISO50
  • 4.2mm