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Cedar-apple Rust Gall - Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae This fungus has the fancy name, Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae, which means &quot;naked spore-bearer of the eastern juniper tree.&quot; It&#039;s a heteroecious rust, which means that it requires two species of plants to complete its life cycle. Those two species of plants are: the eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginianus) and apple trees (Malus sylvestris). It&#039;s also an obligate pathogen, so it can&#039;t live without those hosts. It has four different stages, the most impressive of which is the orange teliospore stage because this is when the gall sprouts gelatinous, orange horns that look like tentacles. Pretty impressive. To further add to its coolness, each gelatinous spore horn is actually composed of hundreds of two-celled teliospores.<br />
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Habitat: Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginianus) bordering a meadow<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78963/cedar-apple_rust_gall_-_gymnosporangium_juniperi-virginianae.html" title="Cedar-apple Rust Gall - Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/78963_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1562198410&Signature=jTza%2BJL3wLTLHVIY%2BkAnNsKvE5s%3D" width="200" height="156" alt="Cedar-apple Rust Gall - Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae This fungus has the fancy name, Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae, which means &quot;naked spore-bearer of the eastern juniper tree.&quot; It&#039;s a heteroecious rust, which means that it requires two species of plants to complete its life cycle. Those two species of plants are: the eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginianus) and apple trees (Malus sylvestris). It&#039;s also an obligate pathogen, so it can&#039;t live without those hosts. It has four different stages, the most impressive of which is the orange teliospore stage because this is when the gall sprouts gelatinous, orange horns that look like tentacles. Pretty impressive. To further add to its coolness, each gelatinous spore horn is actually composed of hundreds of two-celled teliospores.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginianus) bordering a meadow<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78962/cedar-apple_rust_gall_-_gymnosporangium_juniperi-virginianae.html Cedar-apple Rust,Geotagged,Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae,Spring,United States" /></a></figure> Cedar-apple Rust,Geotagged,Gymnosporangium,Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae,Spring,United States,gall Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Cedar-apple Rust Gall - Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae

This fungus has the fancy name, Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae, which means "naked spore-bearer of the eastern juniper tree." It's a heteroecious rust, which means that it requires two species of plants to complete its life cycle. Those two species of plants are: the eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginianus) and apple trees (Malus sylvestris). It's also an obligate pathogen, so it can't live without those hosts. It has four different stages, the most impressive of which is the orange teliospore stage because this is when the gall sprouts gelatinous, orange horns that look like tentacles. Pretty impressive. To further add to its coolness, each gelatinous spore horn is actually composed of hundreds of two-celled teliospores.

Habitat: Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginianus) bordering a meadow

Cedar-apple Rust Gall - Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae This fungus has the fancy name, Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae, which means "naked spore-bearer of the eastern juniper tree." It's a heteroecious rust, which means that it requires two species of plants to complete its life cycle. Those two species of plants are: the eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginianus) and apple trees (Malus sylvestris). It's also an obligate pathogen, so it can't live without those hosts. It has four different stages, the most impressive of which is the orange teliospore stage because this is when the gall sprouts gelatinous, orange horns that look like tentacles. Pretty impressive. To further add to its coolness, each gelatinous spore horn is actually composed of hundreds of two-celled teliospores.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginianus) bordering a meadow<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78962/cedar-apple_rust_gall_-_gymnosporangium_juniperi-virginianae.html Cedar-apple Rust,Geotagged,Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae,Spring,United States

    comments (5)

  1. Super post, both the photo and the educational description, which is mind blowing. Posted 11 days ago
    1. Thanks, Ferdy. Someday I hope to have my camera with me when I see them like this:
      Juniper-Apple Rust (Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae) Several growths on a cedar tree in a front yard in NW Georgia (Gordon County), US.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/71152/juniper-apple_rust_gymnosporangium_juniperi-virginianae.html Cedar-apple Rust,Geotagged,Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae,Spring,United States
      Posted 10 days ago
      1. Attach your camera to your new necklace. Problem solved. Posted 10 days ago
        1. You're such a helpful problem-solver! Posted 9 days ago
          1. Welcome! Posted 9 days ago

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''Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae'' is a plant pathogen that causes cedar-apple rust. In virtually any location where apples or crabapples and Eastern red-cedar coexist, cedar apple rust can be a destructive or disfiguring disease on both the apples and cedars. Quince and hawthorn are the most common host and many species of juniper can substitute for the Eastern red cedars.

Similar species: Uredinales
Species identified by Christine Young
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By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded May 14, 2019. Captured Apr 6, 2019 14:38 in 40 W Elm St, Greenwich, CT 06830, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/8.0
  • 1/256s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm