JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Darkling Beetle - Tarpela micans TL: ~15 mm. Elongate, blackish beetle with rainbow sheen on elytra. Pronotum coarsely punctate.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Under a rotting log in a rural, wooded backyard<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78267/darkling_beetle_-_tarpela_micans.html" title="Darkling Beetle - Tarpela micans"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/78267_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1609372810&Signature=%2Fw%2BwjtCE%2B5rM8RtQ7uAznJ%2BLJkM%3D" width="200" height="170" alt="Darkling Beetle - Tarpela micans TL: ~15 mm. Elongate, blackish beetle with rainbow sheen on elytra. Pronotum coarsely punctate.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Under a rotting log in a rural, wooded backyard<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78268/darkling_beetle_-_tarpela_micans.html Geotagged,Spring,Tarpela micans,Tenebrionidae,United States,beetle,tarpela" /></a></figure> Geotagged,Spring,Tarpela micans,United States,beetle Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Darkling Beetle - Tarpela micans

TL: ~15 mm. Elongate, blackish beetle with rainbow sheen on elytra. Pronotum coarsely punctate.

Habitat: Under a rotting log in a rural, wooded backyard

Darkling Beetle - Tarpela micans TL: ~15 mm. Elongate, blackish beetle with rainbow sheen on elytra. Pronotum coarsely punctate.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Under a rotting log in a rural, wooded backyard<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78268/darkling_beetle_-_tarpela_micans.html Geotagged,Spring,Tarpela micans,Tenebrionidae,United States,beetle,tarpela

    comments (12)

  1. Nice rainbow glow up close! Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks, I had to lighten the shadows to get the effect. Posted one year ago
      1. It worked! Posted one year ago
        1. Thanks. The colors were even more impressive when I seriously lightened the shadows, but it also looked really bad, so I took the middle ground. Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
          1. I know what you mean, when lifting shadows too much, it has side effects. In Lightroom, a counter measure is to then apply negative blacks. Which makes no sense at all, but it works. Posted one year ago
            1. I might have done the photoshop version of that. After lifting the shadows, I did something to darken the photo a bit...I can't remember what it's called though. I'm still just starting to learn about editing photos... Posted one year ago
              1. "I'm still just starting to learn about editing photos..."

                Which is still hard to believe, given the quality of your output. I can ensure you that when just checking your output, most professional photographers would assume you have a full-fledged (RAW) workflow. Because that's what it takes to produce this.

                Guess not. Puts things in perspective.
                Posted one year ago
                1. Thanks...I've been slow to learn editing because I have trouble figuring out what looks good and how to recreate the natural appearance (if it was lost via the camera). Plus, I like simple, lol. I've decided that it will take me a long time to start shooting RAW because it wasn't intuitive to me (the one time that I tried it, hehe). Posted one year ago
                  1. RAW does set you back a few steps from the JPEG and isn't intuitive at all. Is it worth it to put in that extra time, a few questions I can think of to answer this for yourself:

                    - If you often find the need to strongly recover details in shadows or highlights. This is JPEG biggest weakness compared to RAW, where you can recover multiple stops of under/overexposure. Yet if you don't find yourself in that situation often, it's of no use. I personally strongly need this because of many birds taken in back light. Without recovery they would just be dark silhouettes. It doesn't seem a problem in your shots, therefore your answer may be different.

                    - White balance corrections. You can't do much color toning corrections in JPEG in a non-destructive way. Yet if you have pretty stable light conditions and set the camera to a white balance setting close enough, you won't often need such a correction.

                    Those two would be decisive reasons for JPEG/RAW. Lesser important reasons to decide in favor or against it:

                    - HDR. If you want to combine multiple shots to maximize dynamic range. RAW would be better. Yet an edge case, not a very typical scenario. It's also not impossible in JPEG, just harder.

                    - Digital negative. If you plan to make wildly different edit from the same shot or go back in history and completely redo post processing. RAW can do that.

                    From what I see, you're consistently producing top shots in a light and efficient flow. Don't change that if you're already happy. RAW is no goal. It has serious downsides only worth it if you're in need of its flexibility.

                    Or, don't chose at all and pick JPEG+RAW combined shooting and only use the RAW for special occasions.
                    Posted one year ago
                    1. Lol, Ferdy - you are so awesome in how you are always so thorough and helpful. I have saved so many of your emails and comments in files on my computer so I can reference them when I have photography conundrums. You explain things so well!

                      I don't usually have to recover details, except in cases like this beetle when the subject is so dark. But, I'm still intrigued (yet frustrated) by the RAW process and learning to edit photos in general. I've never been a tech-oriented person (are you gasping?!) and prefer simple/old school just because it's familiar. I always want to find ways to improve my photos and learn more, but I find that I don't have the patience/time/quietness of mind to tackle such things at this point. It's a weird dichotomy - I am seriously intrigued by the tech, but also confused by it. Someday I will have more time and hopefully patience though, I hope! Until then, I will be content to learn slowly through tech savvy photographers like you and others on JD.

                      Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
                      1. Thank you for the nice compliment, sometimes I feel I may be over-explaining, so it's good to hear it is of use.

                        Note though that after getting over that initial bump where you would have your workflow set up, it's really not that much different from what you probably already do. Crop, touch a few sliders, export.

                        You don't have to go on some RAW course, I too thought it was a huge deal before I started using it. It's not. Above all, it's a change of routine, and I can relate that changing routine is hard, especially if what you have already works.

                        Trust me on this though, you grasp concepts a hundred times more complex than RAW. Maybe one day I'll just take you through the entire process after which you can conclude...that's it!?!
                        Posted one year ago
                        1. You're welcome - you don't explain too much. Your thoughts are always helpful, organized, and easy to understand. And, I think you totally put your finger on the issue - routine/change of routine. I am a sucker for my comfort zone when it comes to gadgets and tech. Posted one year ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

''Tarpela micans'' is a species of darkling beetle in the family Tenebrionidae.

Similar species: Beetles
Species identified by Christine Young
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 30, 2019. Captured Apr 27, 2019 15:50 in 31 Ferncrest Ave, Coventry, RI 02816, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/8.0
  • 1/256s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm