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Cricket Killer Wasp (Liris argentatus) ♀ This small wasp was dragging a rather large cricket through rocks, dirt, and leaf litter (at a dense mixed forest edge) for several hours. I&#039;m not sure where it was headed, but it was determined to take its prey with it.<br />
<br />
Cricket killers spend the majority of their time hunting crickets. Hunting involves stinging, capturing, and transporting their prey to an underground nest (usually an abandoned rodent burrow). After being transported, the paralyzed cricket is injected with a single egg. When the larva hatches, it consumes the paralyzed cricket in order to further its development.<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78226/cricket_killer_wasp_liris_argentatus_.html" title="Cricket Killer Wasp (Liris argentatus) ♀"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3231/78226_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1564012810&Signature=urDU8yiG3WHy%2BszSwUF3E510%2FDk%3D" width="200" height="170" alt="Cricket Killer Wasp (Liris argentatus) ♀ This small wasp was dragging a rather large cricket through rocks, dirt, and leaf litter (at a dense mixed forest edge) for several hours. I&#039;m not sure where it was headed, but it was determined to take its prey with it.<br />
<br />
Cricket killers spend the majority of their time hunting crickets. Hunting involves stinging, capturing, and transporting their prey to an underground nest (usually an abandoned rodent burrow). After being transported, the paralyzed cricket is injected with a single egg. When the larva hatches, it consumes the paralyzed cricket in order to further its development.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78226/cricket_killer_wasp_liris_argentatus.html<br />
<br />
Not the same species (same genus), but these videos give you an idea of how the hunting works!<br />
https://youtu.be/580NFebyRo0<br />
https://youtu.be/ZciTmsklSWo Geotagged,Liris argentatus,Spring,United States" /></a></figure><br />
<br />
Not the same species (same genus), but these videos give you an idea of how the hunting works!<br />
<section class="video"><iframe width="448" height="282" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/580NFebyRo0?hd=1&autoplay=0&rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></section><br />
<section class="video"><iframe width="448" height="282" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZciTmsklSWo?hd=1&autoplay=0&rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></section> Geotagged,Liris argentatus,Spring,United States Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Cricket Killer Wasp (Liris argentatus) ♀

This small wasp was dragging a rather large cricket through rocks, dirt, and leaf litter (at a dense mixed forest edge) for several hours. I'm not sure where it was headed, but it was determined to take its prey with it.

Cricket killers spend the majority of their time hunting crickets. Hunting involves stinging, capturing, and transporting their prey to an underground nest (usually an abandoned rodent burrow). After being transported, the paralyzed cricket is injected with a single egg. When the larva hatches, it consumes the paralyzed cricket in order to further its development.

Cricket Killer Wasp (Liris argentatus) ♀ This small wasp was dragging a rather large cricket through rocks, dirt, and leaf litter (at a dense mixed forest edge) for several hours. I'm not sure where it was headed, but it was determined to take its prey with it.<br />
<br />
Cricket killers spend the majority of their time hunting crickets. Hunting involves stinging, capturing, and transporting their prey to an underground nest (usually an abandoned rodent burrow). After being transported, the paralyzed cricket is injected with a single egg. When the larva hatches, it consumes the paralyzed cricket in order to further its development.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78226/cricket_killer_wasp_liris_argentatus.html<br />
<br />
Not the same species (same genus), but these videos give you an idea of how the hunting works!<br />
https://youtu.be/580NFebyRo0<br />
https://youtu.be/ZciTmsklSWo Geotagged,Liris argentatus,Spring,United States


Not the same species (same genus), but these videos give you an idea of how the hunting works!

    comments (2)

  1. omg, what a glorious find! I was expecting it to be slow and tiring drag, the speed of it is surprising! Posted one month ago
    1. It was an awesome spectacle! It wasn't NEARLY as fast as in these videos, but it wasn't that far off (and it had the rough terrain and VERY LARGE cricket working against it). I really wish I would have thought to record a video! Posted one month ago

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''Liris argentatus'' is a species of square-headed wasp in the family Crabronidae. It is found in the Caribbean, Central America, North America, and Oceania.

Species identified by Lisa Kimmerling
View Lisa Kimmerling's profile

By Lisa Kimmerling

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 29, 2019. Captured Apr 28, 2019 00:01 in 234 Oakman Rd NE, Ranger, GA 30734, USA.
  • Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • f/5.6
  • 1/197s
  • ISO100
  • 100mm