JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Sand Bubbler Crab Burrows At the Radhanagar beach on Havelock Island, Andaman islands, India, you can see these strange formations every day at low tide. If you watched for a bit, you could see tiny white crabs coming out of the hole, scooping up sand and rolling it into these tiny balls. Even cooler was that each crab seemed to have its own pattern, with some creating whorls, concentric circles, radiating rays, and many other patterns. I never got bored of looking at them while strolling along the beach. Some internet research suggests that this is their feeding method as they sort through the sand looking for small tidbits to eat. Crabs,Geotagged,Havelock island,India,Indian Ocean,Winter,andamans Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Sand Bubbler Crab Burrows

At the Radhanagar beach on Havelock Island, Andaman islands, India, you can see these strange formations every day at low tide. If you watched for a bit, you could see tiny white crabs coming out of the hole, scooping up sand and rolling it into these tiny balls. Even cooler was that each crab seemed to have its own pattern, with some creating whorls, concentric circles, radiating rays, and many other patterns. I never got bored of looking at them while strolling along the beach. Some internet research suggests that this is their feeding method as they sort through the sand looking for small tidbits to eat.

    comments (7)

  1. So cool! Posted 2 months ago
  2. hi Barry, great observation! We had a discussion earlier whether "signs of wildlife" (such as your example, but could also be scat, etc) should be identified as a species. We decided not to, as you cannot actually see the species. It's a tricky discussion with pros and cons, but just sharing this :) Posted 2 months ago
    1. Heh Ferdy, No problem, although in this case, I saw them a few times and it really wouldn't have helped much as they are tiny, move really fast, and are incredibly shy. I suspect that the species ID is only possible with having one in your hand with a magnifying glass. Given the incredibly patterns that they make in the sand however, I wonder if you could identify the species in that way?? Could be a great PhD thesis for a zoologist student. Posted 2 months ago
      1. It's not about being sure which species it is, my point is that on the photo, the species is physically not visible. Similar to a footstep in the sand, it's a mark made by a species, but not a species in itself. Hope that makes sense :) Posted 2 months ago
        1. Sure, seriously, no worries.
          Posted 2 months ago
  3. beautiful! wonderful observation and explanation! Posted 2 months ago
    1. Thanks - it was fun to watch! Posted 2 months ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

No species on this photo

It has been indicated that there is no species on this photo.

View Barry's profile

By Barry

Attribution Share Alike
Uploaded Apr 10, 2019. Captured Jan 1, 2015 01:32 in Beach N0. 7, Radhanagar Village Havelock Island Andaman Islands Havelock Island Andaman Islands, Andaman and Nicobar Islands 744211, India.
  • HERO4 Black
  • f/2.8
  • 1/975s
  • ISO100
  • 3mm