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Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus) This cutie was hunting in my kitchen. I let it get back to work after I took a couple of photos. Eastern Parson Spider,Geotagged,Herpyllus ecclesiasticus,Spring,United States Click/tap to enlarge

Eastern Parson Spider (Herpyllus ecclesiasticus)

This cutie was hunting in my kitchen. I let it get back to work after I took a couple of photos.

    comments (3)

  1. Hah, found a pretty big one rocketing the floor of our garage. Couldn't take a photo for reasons of being too shocked :) Posted 3 months ago
    1. Haha! You have a bit of arachnophobia? My husband gets freaked out by bugs/spiders. I'm fine with them--so long as they aren't in my shoes or on me :) Posted 3 months ago
      1. I admit that I have a light version of it, yes. I am not scared of insects in general given our travel locations and even focusing on photographing them, but I particular freak out in situations with large, very fast insects or spiders coming in my direction in unpredictable ways :) I think it's more the speed of it that scares me. Posted 3 months ago

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The spider species ''Herpyllus ecclesiasticus'' is commonly called the eastern parson spider, after the abdominal markings resembling an old-style cravat worn by clergy in the 18th century. It is mainly found in Central USA, with finds stretching from North Carolina to southern Alberta, Canada.

Although this spider presents a startling appearance, living indoors as it frequently does, it is not considered harmful. However, some people do have allergic reactions to their bites....hieroglyph.. more

Similar species: Spiders
Species identified by Lisa Kimmerling
View Lisa Kimmerling's profile

By Lisa Kimmerling

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 9, 2019. Captured Mar 25, 2019 03:20 in 110 Earl St, Plainville, GA 30733, USA.
  • Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • f/4.0
  • 1/64s
  • ISO1600
  • 100mm