JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Eupsilia tristigmata Eupsilia tristigmata, an early spring moth, that came to my porch light. The temperature was around 43 degrees F.<br />
<br />
Larval hosts are plants in the Rose family (Rosaceae) and Blueberry Family (Ericaceae). The flight period for Eupsilia tristigmata is in the early spring before most plants have leafed out and again in late summer to early fall when the larvae have metamorphosed to adults.<br />
<br />
This is a new record for my personal species checklist and the fourth early spring moth this year. As cool and damp as the weather is there are a number of Lepidoptera that are flying now most of which have overwintered as adults. Additionally, there are caterpillars that have overwintered in their next to the last instar and are feeding on bits of vegetation. Three that I&#039;ve seen this week are the Woolly Bear (Pyrrharctia isabella), Virginia Ctenucha (Ctenucha virginiana), and Ruby Tiger Moth (Phragmatobia fuliginosa). Eupsilia tristigmata,Geotagged,Spring,United States,early spring moth,moth Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Eupsilia tristigmata

Eupsilia tristigmata, an early spring moth, that came to my porch light. The temperature was around 43 degrees F.

Larval hosts are plants in the Rose family (Rosaceae) and Blueberry Family (Ericaceae). The flight period for Eupsilia tristigmata is in the early spring before most plants have leafed out and again in late summer to early fall when the larvae have metamorphosed to adults.

This is a new record for my personal species checklist and the fourth early spring moth this year. As cool and damp as the weather is there are a number of Lepidoptera that are flying now most of which have overwintered as adults. Additionally, there are caterpillars that have overwintered in their next to the last instar and are feeding on bits of vegetation. Three that I've seen this week are the Woolly Bear (Pyrrharctia isabella), Virginia Ctenucha (Ctenucha virginiana), and Ruby Tiger Moth (Phragmatobia fuliginosa).

    comments (13)

  1. What a beauty! Posted 2 months ago
    1. I hope it is here again tonight along with a very nervous moth of a different species that wouldn't stay. Posted 2 months ago
      1. I saw one moth last night! It flew inside and I had a frantic race with my cats to see who could catch it first. Luckily for the moth, I caught it and released it back outside...But, not before getting some photos of it first, of course. Posted 2 months ago
        1. I'll be looking for those. My cat loves it when I go out to search for moths. There's always a chance (he thinks) of a new thing to chase around the house. Posted 2 months ago
          1. Haha, yes! They are suddenly transformed into fierce hunters until they actually catch the bug. Then, they just sit there, poking it, and staring at it. Posted 2 months ago
            1. Mine has a tendency to put them in the dog's water bowl and then tries to scoop them out. Posted 2 months ago
              1. Lol, cats are so quirky! Posted 2 months ago
  2. Can you explain your record, Gary? Is it a record in early spring species specifically? Posted 2 months ago
    1. Ferdy, an early spring species. This and others I may find this month eclosed in the fall and overwintered in the adult stage. This gives them an early start to lay eggs on their preferred larval host plants.

      The record is my moth checklist which is slowly approaching 500 species.
      Posted 2 months ago, modified 2 months ago
      1. A very impressive number. Hope you'll share lots here so that we can knock down birds from the throne as best documented species here hehe. Posted 2 months ago
        1. I'm working on it. There are an estimated 2,000 moth species just in Minnesota but some are extremely small and hard to capture. Posted 2 months ago
          1. No pressure, just excitement. We're not going anywhere so take your time :) Posted 2 months ago
            1. I know but I'm kind of excited about finding these micro-moths. Posted 2 months ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

''Eupsilia tristigmata'', known generally as the three-spotted sallow or brown fruitworm, is a species of cutworm or dart moth in the family Noctuidae. It is found in North America.

The MONA or Hodges number for ''Eupsilia tristigmata'' is 9935.

Similar species: Moths And Butterflies
Species identified by Gary B
View Gary B's profile

By Gary B

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 8, 2019. Captured Apr 7, 2019 21:28 in 4408 Miller Rd, Barnum, MN 55707, USA.
  • Canon EOS Rebel T6
  • f/4.0
  • 1/64s
  • ISO800
  • 100mm