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Huperzia selago with developing sporophylls. Huperzia selago (Fir Clubmoss) growing in a mixed spruce/fir/aspen/birch forest in full shade at the edge of a vernal pool. Photo taken on June 1, 2005. Geotagged,Huperzia selago,Lycopodium selago,Minnesota,United States,clubmoss,fir clubmoss,sporophylls Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Huperzia selago with developing sporophylls.

Huperzia selago (Fir Clubmoss) growing in a mixed spruce/fir/aspen/birch forest in full shade at the edge of a vernal pool. Photo taken on June 1, 2005.

    comments (5)

  1. Very happy with this, mosses are underdocumented, if that's a word. Posted 4 months ago
    1. Not a moss by a Lycopod, one of the true vascular plants. Common names aren't always phylogenetically correct. Hope to get some more recent photos of this plant from my local area. I'd also encourage anyone who has seen something like this species to post it.

      I think underdocumented is a word. My spell checker says it is.
      Posted 4 months ago
      1. I might have one or two similar in my list of plants I haven't been able to ID...
        I definitely have some mosses in there, and grasses and rushes, which I've recently become interested in, but still find pretty baffling.. I don't think I really trust many if any of my IDs of those yet..
        https://www.jungledragon.com/list/553/24
        Posted 4 months ago
        1. I think I figured out the Carex but as for the Juncus there's a lot of information needed to get to species besides the inflorescence. The other two are new to me but might be related to the mint family but I could be way off with that. Posted 4 months ago
  2. really beautiful and delicate! Posted 4 months ago

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''Huperzia selago'', the northern firmoss or fir clubmoss, is a vascular plant in the family Lycopodiaceae. It has a circumpolar distribution in temperate and boreal regions in both hemispheres.

Leaves are of two types: fertile (sporophylls) bearing spore sacs, and sterile (trophophylls) lacking spores. Both are evergreen, pointed at the tip, narrowly triangular, broadest at or near the base, with stomates (pores) on both the upper and lower surface, the larger leaves with 30 to 90 per.. more

Similar species: Lycopodiales
Species identified by Gary B
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By Gary B

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Uploaded Mar 7, 2019. Captured in 4408 Miller Rd, Barnum, MN 55707, USA.
  • E995