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Funeral Bells - Galerina marginata Cap: Convex; sticky; orange with slight two-toned appearance; slightly sunken, darker center; faintly lined margin <br />
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Gills: Brownish; close with frequent short gills; slightly decurrent<br />
<br />
Stem: Dry; rusty-brown ring zone<br />
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Habitat: Growing in clusters out of a fallen, rotting, moss-covered tree in a bog<br />
<br />
This species has the moniker &quot;funeral bells&quot;, and is not a mushroom that you want to mess around with. <br />
Galerina marginata has the same kind of toxins that the deadly Amanita species produce. These toxins, called amatoxins, are especially dangerous because they do not produce symptoms for 6-24 hours. Because of the delayed onset of symptoms, the sufferer may not realize that the mushroom they ate earlier is the cause of their illness. Initial symptoms resemble food poisoning, but gradually worsen for a few days until there is a short remission. Unfortunately, the symptoms return within 24 hours, and after another week or so, the liver and kidneys fail. This will result in death unless a liver transplant is performed. <br />
<br />
There is a drug called Silibinin, which is derived from milk thistle, that may be useful in treating amatoxin poisoning - if it is administered soon after poisoning occurs.<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/74825/funeral_bells_-_galerina_marginata.html" title="Funeral Bells - Galerina marginata"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/74825_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1562198410&Signature=SlIhNe99pt5S9rUJVUIjQyyNc4g%3D" width="200" height="152" alt="Funeral Bells - Galerina marginata Cap: Convex; sticky; orange with slight two-toned appearance; slightly sunken, darker center; faintly lined margin <br />
<br />
Gills: Brownish; close with frequent short gills; slightly decurrent<br />
<br />
Stem: Dry; rusty-brown ring zone<br />
<br />
Habitat: Growing in clusters out of a fallen, rotting, moss-covered tree in a bog<br />
<br />
This species has the moniker &quot;funeral bells&quot;, and is not a mushroom that you want to mess around with. <br />
Galerina marginata has the same kind of toxins that the deadly Amanita species produce. These toxins, called amatoxins, are especially dangerous because they do not produce symptoms for 6-24 hours. Because of the delayed onset of symptoms, the sufferer may not realize that the mushroom they ate earlier is the cause of their illness. Initial symptoms resemble food poisoning, but gradually worsen for a few days until there is a short remission. Unfortunately, the symptoms return within 24 hours, and after another week or so, the liver and kidneys fail. This will result in death unless a liver transplant is performed. <br />
<br />
There is a drug called Silibinin, which is derived from milk thistle, that may be useful in treating amatoxin poisoning - if it is administered soon after poisoning occurs.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/74824/funeral_bells_-_galerina_marginata.html Fall,Galerina marginata,Geotagged,United States,funeral bells,galerina" /></a></figure> Fall,Galerina marginata,Geotagged,United States Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Funeral Bells - Galerina marginata

Cap: Convex; sticky; orange with slight two-toned appearance; slightly sunken, darker center; faintly lined margin

Gills: Brownish; close with frequent short gills; slightly decurrent

Stem: Dry; rusty-brown ring zone

Habitat: Growing in clusters out of a fallen, rotting, moss-covered tree in a bog

This species has the moniker "funeral bells", and is not a mushroom that you want to mess around with.
Galerina marginata has the same kind of toxins that the deadly Amanita species produce. These toxins, called amatoxins, are especially dangerous because they do not produce symptoms for 6-24 hours. Because of the delayed onset of symptoms, the sufferer may not realize that the mushroom they ate earlier is the cause of their illness. Initial symptoms resemble food poisoning, but gradually worsen for a few days until there is a short remission. Unfortunately, the symptoms return within 24 hours, and after another week or so, the liver and kidneys fail. This will result in death unless a liver transplant is performed.

There is a drug called Silibinin, which is derived from milk thistle, that may be useful in treating amatoxin poisoning - if it is administered soon after poisoning occurs.

Funeral Bells - Galerina marginata Cap: Convex; sticky; orange with slight two-toned appearance; slightly sunken, darker center; faintly lined margin <br />
<br />
Gills: Brownish; close with frequent short gills; slightly decurrent<br />
<br />
Stem: Dry; rusty-brown ring zone<br />
<br />
Habitat: Growing in clusters out of a fallen, rotting, moss-covered tree in a bog<br />
<br />
This species has the moniker "funeral bells", and is not a mushroom that you want to mess around with. <br />
Galerina marginata has the same kind of toxins that the deadly Amanita species produce. These toxins, called amatoxins, are especially dangerous because they do not produce symptoms for 6-24 hours. Because of the delayed onset of symptoms, the sufferer may not realize that the mushroom they ate earlier is the cause of their illness. Initial symptoms resemble food poisoning, but gradually worsen for a few days until there is a short remission. Unfortunately, the symptoms return within 24 hours, and after another week or so, the liver and kidneys fail. This will result in death unless a liver transplant is performed. <br />
<br />
There is a drug called Silibinin, which is derived from milk thistle, that may be useful in treating amatoxin poisoning - if it is administered soon after poisoning occurs.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/74824/funeral_bells_-_galerina_marginata.html Fall,Galerina marginata,Geotagged,United States,funeral bells,galerina

    comments (3)

  1. Beautiful dramatic lighting :) Posted 3 months ago
    1. Thanks Ferdy! Posted 2 months ago
  2. From today's Facebook post:

    Galerina marginata, also known as “funeral bells”, “autumn skullcap”, and “deadly galerina”, is a poisonous mushroom that is found throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Considering its dire common names, this is not a mushroom that you want to mess around with. It is definitely NOT edible. Galerina marginata is a “little brown mushroom”, which is the term used to describe small, brown mushrooms that are difficult to identify and are easily confused. Some little brown mushrooms are edible, while others definitely are not.

    What makes Galerina marginata so deadly? It contains toxins, called amatoxins, which are especially dangerous because they do not produce symptoms for 6-24 hours after ingestion. Because of this delayed onset of symptoms, a person may not realize that their illness was caused by a mushroom they ate. And, therefore, they may not seek immediate medical attention—a fatal mistake. Initial symptoms resemble food poisoning, but gradually worsen for a few days until there is a short remission. At this point, the person assumes they are healed of this mysterious sickness. Unfortunately, the symptoms will return within 24 hours leading to liver and kidney failure. This will result in death unless a liver transplant is performed. If treated very early, there is a drug called Silibinin, derived from milk thistle, which may be useful in treating amatoxin poisoning. But, there is no guarantee of survival, even with early treatment. So, it’s best to never eat a little brown mushroom in the wild, unless you are an expert and know exactly what you’re ingesting! {Spotted in New York, USA by JungleDragon moderator, Christine Young} #JungleDragon
    Posted 10 days ago

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''Galerina marginata'' is a species of poisonous fungus in the family Hymenogastraceae of the order Agaricales. Prior to 2001, the species ''G. autumnalis'', ''G. oregonensis'', ''G. unicolor'', and ''G. venenata'' were thought to be separate due to differences in habitat and the viscidity of their caps, but phylogenetic analysis showed that they are all the same species.

The fruit bodies of this fungus have brown to yellow-brown caps that fade in color when drying. The gills are.. more

Similar species: Gilled Mushrooms
Species identified by Christine Young
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Feb 23, 2019. Captured Oct 14, 2018 10:27 in 3280 Franklin Ave, Millbrook, NY 12545, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/2.8
  • 1/128s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm