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Corythucha ciliata My first images of this species from the Netherlands, found under bark of a Sycamore/Plane tree (Platanus) on the Vrijthof in Maastricht (one of the few currently known populations in the Netherlands) <br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/71888/corythucha_ciliata.html" title="Corythucha ciliata"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3043/71888_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1574899210&Signature=kG%2F9FbXB7GqimVhkdXEeseH5T2A%3D" width="200" height="150" alt="Corythucha ciliata My first images of this species from the Netherlands, found under bark of a Sycamore/Plane tree (Platanus) on the Vrijthof in Maastricht (one of the few currently known populations in the Netherlands) <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/71887/corythucha_ciliata.html Corythucha,Corythucha ciliata,Heteroptera,Lacebug,Tingidae,invasive species" /></a></figure> Corythucha,Corythucha ciliata,Heteroptera,Lacebug,Tingidae,invasive species Click/tap to enlarge PromotedCountry intro

Corythucha ciliata

My first images of this species from the Netherlands, found under bark of a Sycamore/Plane tree (Platanus) on the Vrijthof in Maastricht (one of the few currently known populations in the Netherlands)

Corythucha ciliata My first images of this species from the Netherlands, found under bark of a Sycamore/Plane tree (Platanus) on the Vrijthof in Maastricht (one of the few currently known populations in the Netherlands) <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/71887/corythucha_ciliata.html Corythucha,Corythucha ciliata,Heteroptera,Lacebug,Tingidae,invasive species

    comments (27)

  1. Woooow! I did not know these could be found here too! In which moment of the year did you see them? I am tempted to visit the place next year! :-) Posted 9 months ago
    1. Howdy, this species "arrived" in the Netherlands a few years back now. It has been recorded on various locations, all in the south of the country by now, but the population on the Vrijthof in Maastricht is by far the largest and most durable yet. I examined a plane tree in a park about 1km from the Vrijthof and found one specimen after about 5 minutes. Later, when arriving on the Vrijthof I walked up to the first Plane tree there, pulled off _one_ small piece of loose bark and had over 20 animals on it. Instant satisfaction :o)
      They can be found all year, but will be on the leafs and fruits in spring and summer - out of reach on a decent tree. As they seek out the loose bark to overwinter this is a very easy/good way to spot them. While you're doing so, also look for Arocatus longiceps - same overwintering strategy:
      Arocatus longiceps A relatively new arrival in the Netherlands and other parts of northwestern Europe caused a lot of taxonomic confusion with Arocatus roeselii, with hybridisation being suggested as one option. For now, heteropterologists prefer to retain the name roeselii for the version living on Alder (Alnus) and on average somewhat brighter red, and the name longiceps for the version living on Plane (Platanus).<br />
This one was found overwintering behind loose patches of bark on Platanus. Arocatus,Arocatus longiceps,Geotagged,Heteroptera,Lygaeidae,Netherlands
      Posted 9 months ago
      1. Haha ...is it too much to ask for a more specific location of the trees? .... :-D Posted 9 months ago
        1. The Vrijthof is the "main square" in Maastricht. If you visit the city you will inevitably end up on the Vrijthof somehow. The (mostly) empty square (use for markets/events etc) is lined with Sycamore trees all around and I think you will be hard pressed to find a tree there _without_ this species on it :o) Posted 9 months ago, modified 9 months ago
  2. Crazy beautiful! Posted 9 months ago
    1. Yes, very pretty critters :o) Wasn't satisfied at all with my old images from France, so when I was in Maastricht the other day I made a point of seeking them out ... Posted 9 months ago
  3. Nice! I love lace bugs, but haven't found one in years! Posted 9 months ago
    1. Considering that these are immigrants from your great Country chances are that you should be able to find some ;o) That said - I only find our native 21Tingidae rarely too :o( The "abundant" ones, such as Stephanitis takeyai are all invasive... Posted 9 months ago
      1. There are some real beauties with that tag! Posted 9 months ago
        1. Yes, I don't usually "look for" bugs - not my main area of interest - but I may decide to try and find some more of our native species as they do make nice models :o) Posted 9 months ago
          1. Interesting...Do you have a favorite order of insects? Posted 9 months ago
            1. I've done some work on Ladybirds (especially larvae) and have taken it on me to do some of the validation of observations of some other families of beetles for waarneming.nl so I look at Cleroidea, Cantharidae and Oedemeridae a bit more seriously, but mostly I'm interested to learn more about the less popular groups and have been trying to get my head around Raphidioptera, Mecoptera, Neuroptera, Blattodea, Dermaptera, Microcoryphia, Zygentoma and probably some others that don't enjoy much attention :o)
              P.S. Oh, yes, and Woodlice and Harvestmen - but those are not insects ;o)
              Posted 9 months ago, modified 9 months ago
              1. I prefer the less popular groups as well. Posted 9 months ago
  4. Awesome! Posted 9 months ago
    1. Thanks Ferdy - Credits should go to the model though ;o) Posted 9 months ago
  5. Beautiful bug, superb details. Posted 9 months ago
    1. This species especially drives home the colloquial name "Lace Bug" :o) Posted 9 months ago
      1. It's an appropriate name :) Posted 9 months ago
  6. From today's JungleDragon Facebook post:

    "Lace bugs are inconspicuous, plant feeding insects that are aptly named because the network of veins in their wings resembles lace. They certainly are beautiful bugs, but they can be very destructive to plants. They are usually host-specific and feed on the undersides of leaves by piercing the epidermis and sucking the juices out. When they feed on the liquid in a leaf, they also remove chlorophyll; thus, the afflicted leaves turn white or bronze since it's the chlorophyll that gives leaves their green color. The damage starts out as small dots, called stippling. If prolonged feeding continues, entire leaves and plants can turn brown and die.

    Specifically, the Sycamore Lace Bug (Corythucha ciliata) is an important and highly invasive pest. It's native to North America, but has spread to many countries around the world due to human activity. It feeds mainly on sycamore (Platanus sp.) trees. Although it doesn't usually kill the trees that it infests, the bugs are suspected to vector plant-pathogenic fungi, which can kill trees. {Spotted in the Netherlands by JungleDragon moderator, Pudding4brains} #JungleDragon"
    Posted 9 months ago
    1. Ahwww ... I'm flattered ... thanks Christine :o) Posted 9 months ago
      1. You're welcome, Arp! Posted 9 months ago
    2. Very good choice! :-) Posted 9 months ago
    3. Great!! Posted 9 months ago
  7. Beautiful! cheers* Posted 9 months ago
    1. Thanks Rui :o) Posted 9 months ago
  8. fantastic capture
    Posted 9 months ago
  9. fantastic capture
    Posted 9 months ago

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''Corythucha ciliata'', the sycamore lace bug, is a species of lace bug Tingidae that is linked to sycamores in the New and Old Worlds. It is native to the New world.

Similar species: True Bugs
Species identified by Pudding4brains
View Pudding4brains's profile

By Pudding4brains

Public Domain
Uploaded Dec 31, 2018.