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Split Gills - Schizophyllum commune Delicate fruiting bodies that were 5-15 mm wide. They had fuzzy, white upper surfaces and gill-like folds on the under surfaces. The gills ranged in color from white to brown depending on age.<br />
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Habitat: Deciduous forest<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/57423/split_gills_-_schizophyllum_commune.html" title="Split Gills - Schizophyllum commune"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/57423_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1565827210&Signature=ycPB5ppx6hI0amC0lj6AX20ZWao%3D" width="200" height="158" alt="Split Gills - Schizophyllum commune Delicate fruiting bodies that were 5-15 mm wide. They had fuzzy, white upper surfaces and gill-like folds on the under surfaces. The gills ranged in color from white to brown depending on age. <br />
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 Geotagged,Schizophyllum commune,Split Gills,United States,Winter,fungi,fungus,mushroom,mushrooms,schizophyllum" /></a></figure> Geotagged,Schizophyllum commune,United States,Winter,mushroom,split gills Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Split Gills - Schizophyllum commune

Delicate fruiting bodies that were 5-15 mm wide. They had fuzzy, white upper surfaces and gill-like folds on the under surfaces. The gills ranged in color from white to brown depending on age.

Habitat: Deciduous forest

Split Gills - Schizophyllum commune Delicate fruiting bodies that were 5-15 mm wide. They had fuzzy, white upper surfaces and gill-like folds on the under surfaces. The gills ranged in color from white to brown depending on age. <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/71107/split_gills_-_schizophyllum_commune.html<br />
 Geotagged,Schizophyllum commune,Split Gills,United States,Winter,fungi,fungus,mushroom,mushrooms,schizophyllum

    comments (3)

  1. Perfect! I love this semi-resupinate formation! Posted 7 months ago
    1. Thanks! These are so common, but I still find them irresistible. Posted 7 months ago
  2. From today's Facebook post:

    Split Gills (Schizophyllum commune) is probably the most widely distributed fungus on the planet. Its omnipresence extends to every continent, except Antarctica. This humble mushroom looks boring when viewed from above, but the undersurface is quite spectacular. It has what appear to be gills, but are actually split folds that open and close as moisture levels vary. When it's dry, they shrivel up and close; when it's wet, they open and release spores. This "split gill" feature is unique to the genus Schizophyllum, and is a fantastic adaptation that helps the fungus withstand periods of dry weather.

    As beautiful and practical as its gills are, Schizophyllum commune is famous for another reason: it's system of sexual reproduction. To understand fungal reproduction, you have to forget nearly everything you think you already know about how sex works. While humans have two basic biological sexes, fungi don't abide by gender paradigms. They are not limited by anatomical compatibility. In fact, Schizophyllum commune technically has over 28,000 different sexes. Seriously! The genetics are complicated and difficult to understand, but their huge number of sexes is an awesome adaptation that maximizes genetic diversity.

    Here's (sort of) how it works...Fungal sexual reproduction involves getting two parental nuclei into the same cytoplasm. They accomplish this by touching cells. There are three main stages in this process: plasmogamy (joining of the parental cells), karyogamy (fusion of the parental nuclei), and meiosis (reduction division). In order to increase the odds of outcrossing (mating with nonsiblings), Schizophyllum commune has two different genetic loci to determine mating type (A and B). To further increase the odds, they have multiple alleles for each locus: the A gene has over 300 alleles, while the B gene has 90 alleles! Overall, there are more than 28,000 different combinations of A and B, which is basically the equivalent of having 28,000 different sexes. This crazy number encourages genetic diversity and helps keep mutations silent, which helps this fungus be such a global success. {Spotted in Connecticut, USA by JungleDragon moderator, Christine Young} #JungleDragon

    Posted 3 months ago

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''Schizophyllum commune'' is a common species of fungus in the genus ''Schizophyllum''. It was initially described as a morphological species of global distribution and then revealed to be a species complex encompassing several cryptic species of more narrow distribution, as typical of many mushroom-forming Basidiomycota.

Although European and US guidebooks list it as inedible, this is apparently due to differing standards of taste rather than known toxicity, being regarded with little.. more

Similar species: Gilled Mushrooms
Species identified by Christine Young
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Dec 18, 2018. Captured Feb 19, 2018 13:28 in 5 East St, New Milford, CT 06776, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/5.6
  • 1/166s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm