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South American Tapir in a Protected Private Reserve in Brazil I am proud to be the person who added the first image of the South American Tapir actually taken in South America! I am surprised too. Yes, the radio tracking collar detracts a bit from the &quot;wildness&quot; of the image - but this was a wild tapir that was not fed or restrained in any way, other than the limits of the private reserve where it lived. At the REGUA reserve in south eastern Brazil, mostly set up for Atlantic Forest birds, they introduced tapirs several years ago and still follow the movements of 2 of them (like this one). The reserve was also colonized by Capybara and Caiman, both of which somehow found their way in on their own. I have traveled in the Amazon and Pantanal but never seen a wild tapir until this trip. <br />
Tapirs have a special place in my heart ever since I was 8-years old and the school teacher in Science asked us all to name an animal that only eats plants and after &quot;horse, cow, sheep&quot; I said tapir and the teacher had never heard of it (not really sure how I knew what it was, but I must have seen a picture in one of my animal books)! <br />
So when we checked into the lodge at REGUA and they told us to be careful of wild tapirs coming into the garden occasionally in the evening, I was thrilled (we were instructed not to feed them and make no attempt to approach them). Sure enough, this one showed up and I had the joy of finally seeing a wild tapir. Apparently they started coming in to steal the fruit on the birding table. After the lodge moved the fruit into the trees, they still would visit - which is great for the guests, especially if they have always wanted to see a tapir. I would still love to see the amazing black-and-white Malaysian tapir someday . . . Atlantic forest,Brazil,Geotagged,REGUA,South American tapir,Spring,Tapirus terrestris Click/tap to enlarge Country intro

South American Tapir in a Protected Private Reserve in Brazil

I am proud to be the person who added the first image of the South American Tapir actually taken in South America! I am surprised too. Yes, the radio tracking collar detracts a bit from the "wildness" of the image - but this was a wild tapir that was not fed or restrained in any way, other than the limits of the private reserve where it lived. At the REGUA reserve in south eastern Brazil, mostly set up for Atlantic Forest birds, they introduced tapirs several years ago and still follow the movements of 2 of them (like this one). The reserve was also colonized by Capybara and Caiman, both of which somehow found their way in on their own. I have traveled in the Amazon and Pantanal but never seen a wild tapir until this trip.
Tapirs have a special place in my heart ever since I was 8-years old and the school teacher in Science asked us all to name an animal that only eats plants and after "horse, cow, sheep" I said tapir and the teacher had never heard of it (not really sure how I knew what it was, but I must have seen a picture in one of my animal books)!
So when we checked into the lodge at REGUA and they told us to be careful of wild tapirs coming into the garden occasionally in the evening, I was thrilled (we were instructed not to feed them and make no attempt to approach them). Sure enough, this one showed up and I had the joy of finally seeing a wild tapir. Apparently they started coming in to steal the fruit on the birding table. After the lodge moved the fruit into the trees, they still would visit - which is great for the guests, especially if they have always wanted to see a tapir. I would still love to see the amazing black-and-white Malaysian tapir someday . . .

    comments (2)

  1. Wow! What a treat! thanks for sharing with us! I can imagine how you felt when you the tapir :-) Posted 3 years ago
  2. Fantastic spotting and story! Posted 3 years ago

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The South American tapir , Brazilian tapir , lowland tapir or ''anta'', is one of four species in the tapir family, along with the mountain, the Malayan, and the Baird's tapirs. It is the second-largest land mammal in South America, after the Baird's tapir.

Similar species: Odd-toed Ungulates
Species identified by Barry
View Barry's profile

By Barry

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Uploaded Dec 9, 2018. Captured Sep 25, 2018 22:17 in Unnamed Road, Cachoeiras de Macacu - RJ, 28680-000, Brazil.
  • DC-TZ202
  • f/5.0
  • 10/1250s
  • ISO3200
  • 32.8mm