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New Forest Pony The New Forest pony is one of the recognised mountain and moorland or native pony breeds of the British Isles. Height varies from around 12 to 14.2 hands (48 to 58 inches, 122 to 147 cm); ponies of all heights should be strong, workmanlike, and of a good riding type. They are valued for hardiness, strength, and sure-footedness.<br />
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The breed is indigenous to the New Forest in Hampshire in southern England, where equines have lived since before the last Ice Age; remains dating back to 500,000 BC have been found within 50 miles (80 km) of the heart of the modern New Forest. DNA studies have shown ancient shared ancestry with the Celtic-type Asturc&oacute;n and Pottok ponies. Many breeds have contributed to the foundation bloodstock of the New Forest pony, but today only ponies whose parents are both registered as purebred in the approved section of the stud book may be registered as purebred. Domestic horse,Equus ferus caballus,Fall,Geotagged,Horses,New forest,Ponies,United Kingdom Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

New Forest Pony

The New Forest pony is one of the recognised mountain and moorland or native pony breeds of the British Isles. Height varies from around 12 to 14.2 hands (48 to 58 inches, 122 to 147 cm); ponies of all heights should be strong, workmanlike, and of a good riding type. They are valued for hardiness, strength, and sure-footedness.

The breed is indigenous to the New Forest in Hampshire in southern England, where equines have lived since before the last Ice Age; remains dating back to 500,000 BC have been found within 50 miles (80 km) of the heart of the modern New Forest. DNA studies have shown ancient shared ancestry with the Celtic-type Asturcón and Pottok ponies. Many breeds have contributed to the foundation bloodstock of the New Forest pony, but today only ponies whose parents are both registered as purebred in the approved section of the stud book may be registered as purebred.

    comments (4)

  1. Great shot, Claire <3 Posted 7 months ago
    1. Thanks Christine!
      Posted 7 months ago
  2. Great photo and beautiful background story!

    As a metric man I can only smile at stuff like this: "Height varies from around 12 to 14.2 hands"

    That's about two stones per hand multiplied by an inch of pork head more than I expected.

    Posted 7 months ago
    1. Ha ha, that is so funny! Never could get my head around hands! Posted 7 months ago

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The horse is one of two extant subspecies of ''Equus ferus''. It is an odd-toed ungulate mammal belonging to the taxonomic family Equidae. The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature into the large, single-toed animal of today. Humans began to domesticate horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC. Horses in the subspecies ''caballus'' are domesticated, although some domesticated populations live.. more

Similar species: Odd-toed Ungulates
Species identified by Claire Hamilton
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By Claire Hamilton

All rights reserved
Uploaded Nov 25, 2018. Captured Nov 15, 2018 11:16 in B3078, Fordingbridge SP6, UK.
  • Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • f/5.6
  • 1/500s
  • ISO1250
  • 320mm