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Ghost Tiger Beetle My favourite insect is the Tiger Beetle, not only are they the fastest insect in the world, they are known for their aggressive predatory habits. This Ghost Tiger Beetle (Ellipsoptera lepida) blended so perfectly in the white sand that he lived up to his name, Ghost. Found at the Larose Forest, Limoges, Ontario, Canada. Conservation Status: imperiled (N2N3) in Canada (NatureServe). Canada,Ellipsoptera lepida,Geotagged,Ghost Tiger Beetle,Larose Forest,Limoges,Ontario,Summer,imperiled species,lepida Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Ghost Tiger Beetle

My favourite insect is the Tiger Beetle, not only are they the fastest insect in the world, they are known for their aggressive predatory habits. This Ghost Tiger Beetle (Ellipsoptera lepida) blended so perfectly in the white sand that he lived up to his name, Ghost. Found at the Larose Forest, Limoges, Ontario, Canada. Conservation Status: imperiled (N2N3) in Canada (NatureServe).

    comments (5)

  1. Tiger beetles are amazing! Lovely find! Posted 2 years ago
    1. They are my favourite critters to be around. Posted 2 years ago
      1. Can't wait to see more from you in that category then! :D Posted 2 years ago
  2. From today's JungleDragon Facebook post:

    "Tiger beetles (Subfamily Cicindelinae) are a diverse group of predatory ground beetles. In fact, there are more than 2,600 known species of tiger beetles. Their long legs, large eyes, intricate patterns, and oversized mouthparts give them a very elegant appearance that is irresistible to any insect-lover. Found throughout much of the world, these rapacious predators will feed on practically any arthropod that they can fit in their mouths. They crush, dismember, and spit digestive enzymes into their prey before consuming them. As predators, these mini-beasts have an important asset: speed. Exactly how fast is a tiger beetle? Tiger beetles, relative to their size, are the fastest creatures on Earth; some can run about five miles per hour! In fact, they run so fast that they temporarily blind themselves. When running full tilt, everything becomes a blur and the beetles' eyes can't gather enough photons to form images. To overcome this obstacle, they run in short bursts, frequently stopping to re-orient themselves. And, they hold their antennae directly in front of them in order to mechanically detect objects, thus avoiding unnecessary collisions.

    The Ghost Tiger Beetle (Ellipsoptera lepida) is a rare and vulnerable tiger beetle. They live in sandy habitats, many of which have been lost to urbanization. This beetle, in addition to many other tiger beetle species, is constantly under threat from plant succession, invasive species, habitat loss, human traffic, pollution, and off-road vehicle use. Ironically, they are a disturbance-dependent species, but the level of disturbance they are experiencing is more than they can bear. They are taking their last stand for survival on tiny portions of what remains of their natural habitat. Tiger beetles may be dominant, invertebrate predators, but they are no match for the Earth's apex predator—humans. These creatures are our responsibility, and thankfully, many have been placed on state or federal threatened and endangered species lists. They are not lost yet, and hopefully we can keep it that way! {Spotted in Ontario, Canada by JungleDragon user, Greg Shchepanek} #JungleDragon"
    Posted 2 years ago
    1. YESSS! Love this!

      Great feature!
      Posted 2 years ago

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''Ellipsoptera lepida'', the ghost tiger beetle, or the little white tiger beetle, is a species of flashy tiger beetle in the family Carabidae. It is found in Central America and North America. It is a state threatened species in Minnesota.

Similar species: Beetles
Species identified by Greg Shchepanek
View Greg Shchepanek's profile

By Greg Shchepanek

All rights reserved
Uploaded Nov 22, 2018. Captured Jul 17, 2016 16:40 in 1794 Racette Rd, Limoges, ON K0A 2M0, Canada.
  • Canon PowerShot G7 X
  • f/4.0
  • 1/1244s
  • ISO125
  • 11.847mm