JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Dead Razor Grinder cicada with a fungus growing on it. I have never found a dead cicada body without the fungus . Not sure if the fungus is the couse of death. Henicopsaltria eydouxii,Razor grinder Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Dead Razor Grinder cicada with a fungus growing on it.

I have never found a dead cicada body without the fungus . Not sure if the fungus is the couse of death.

    comments (4)

  1. I'd say Beauveria bassiana, an entomopathogenic fungus which hijacks behavior in insects, is a good match! Very cool!

    Perhaps make a separate post for the fungus as well? We would love to add it to the database!

    Also, can you set a geotag?
    Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
  2. Agree with Lisa - it looks like a Bb infection! I used to work with this fungus - exploring its efficacy in controlling ticks :).

    The fungus probably takes hold of the cicada when it is leaving the soil as a nymph. It usually invades through the mouth or anus and then spreads through the insect over time. Interestingly, it's thought that soil-dwelling insects should be somewhat immune to Bb, but they clearly are not. It's fascinating that you always see dead cicadas that are infected! Do you have shots of any others? There are other entomopathogenic fungi that infect insects and would look similar to Bb.
    Posted one year ago
    1. Thank you Christine .
      I will be much more observant next time I will get to that area in end of February 2019 which is still warm enough.Last year I found them at the end of March.
      Posted one year ago
      1. Nice! I rarely find infected cadavers, but get so super excited when I do! I hope you have luck next year finding more, although sad for the insects :/. Posted one year ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

''Henicopsaltria eydouxii'', commonly known as the razor grinder, is a large species of cicada native to eastern Australia. Predominantly brown in colour, it is found in dry and wet sclerophyll forest in December and January and is quite common in Brisbane.

Similar species: True Bugs
Species identified by Ernst
View Ernst's profile

By Ernst

All rights reserved
Uploaded Nov 14, 2018. Captured Mar 28, 2018 19:54.
  • Canon EOS 700D
  • f/11.0
  • 1/197s
  • ISO1600
  • 89mm