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Shy Nasturtium Native to South and Central America, seen here in a home garden. Plants have showy, often intensely bright flowers, and rounded, shield-shaped leaves with the petiole in the centre. <br />
I spoke with the gentleman whose garden this was and he told me these were Tropaeolum majus. All parts of the plant are edible and after he gave me kind permission to take some shots, he and I enjoyed some together before we said cheerio! <br />
 Australia,Garden,Geotagged,Indian cress,Leaf,Macro,Nasturtium,Spring,Tropaeolaceae,Tropaeolum majus,botany,flower,plant Click/tap to enlarge PromotedCountry intro

Shy Nasturtium

Native to South and Central America, seen here in a home garden. Plants have showy, often intensely bright flowers, and rounded, shield-shaped leaves with the petiole in the centre.
I spoke with the gentleman whose garden this was and he told me these were Tropaeolum majus. All parts of the plant are edible and after he gave me kind permission to take some shots, he and I enjoyed some together before we said cheerio!

    comments (4)

  1. Lovely! What did they taste like? Posted 5 months ago
    1. Peppery Christine....I'd liken it to watercress if you've ever had that? I've had the flowers in salads before which always adds a pretty element. Posted 5 months ago
      1. Perfect! I love nasturtium leaves!! My in-laws grow them. They are delicious in salads!

        I agree with Ruth that they are like peppery greens.
        Posted 5 months ago, modified 5 months ago
        1. Interesting! I love peppery greens. Posted 5 months ago

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Tropaeolum majus (garden nasturtium, Indian cress or monks cress) is a flowering plant in the family Tropaeolaceae, originating in the Andes from Bolivia north to Colombia. It is of cultivated, probably hybrid origin, with possible parent species including T. minus, T. moritzianum, T. peltophorum, and T. peregrinum. It is not closely related to the genus Nasturtium (which includes watercress).

Similar species: Cabbages
Species identified by Ruth Spigelman
View Ruth Spigelman's profile

By Ruth Spigelman

All rights reserved
Uploaded Nov 12, 2018. Captured Oct 7, 2018 10:39 in 76 Corlette St, Cooks Hill NSW 2300, Australia.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/10.0
  • 1/197s
  • ISO200
  • 100mm