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Pokeweed stem and berries A herbaceous perennial plant in family Phytolaccaceae growing up to 2.4 m in height. It is native to the eastern United States and has significant toxicity. American Pokeweed,Caryophyllales,Geotagged,Macro,Phytolacca americana,Phytolaccaceae,Summer,United States,berries,botany,flora,plant Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Pokeweed stem and berries

A herbaceous perennial plant in family Phytolaccaceae growing up to 2.4 m in height. It is native to the eastern United States and has significant toxicity.

    comments (3)

  1. Nice shot! My grandmother used to cook these - the leaves can be eaten when young, but you have to boil them in several changes of water to get rid of the toxins. It's a lot of work for not much sustenance. The leaves taste like green beans though. I'm pretty sure the berries are always toxic to humans. Posted one year ago
    1. Wow. I remember being shown these when visiting PA and hearing 'highly toxic to humans' and had assumed that meant all parts of the plant. I should have fully researched. You are right, what a lot of effort in cooking. I always think about how humans came to utilise things they found in the natural world - how many deaths there must have been as they tried and tested all the flora and fauna they crossed paths with over the vast stretch of time. Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
      1. Exactly - I can only imagine how many people died while sampling nature's delights! My grandmother and her family did a lot of foraging, and some things were definitely questionable in how safe they were. But, they took great care in preparations. Posted one year ago

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American Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) is a large semi-succulent herbaceous perennial plant growing up to 10 feet (3 metres) in height. It is native to eastern North America, the Midwest, and the Gulf Coast, with more scattered populations in the far West. It is also known as Virginia poke, American nightshade, cancer jalap, coakum, garget, inkberry, pigeon berry, pocan, pokeroot, pokeweed, pokeberry, redweed, scoke,[2] red ink plant and chui xu shang lu (in Chinese medicine).[1] Sometimes the.. more

Similar species: Caryophyllales
Species identified by Ruth Spigelman
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By Ruth Spigelman

All rights reserved
Uploaded Oct 26, 2018. Captured Aug 21, 2015 14:14 in 308 Catherine Ave, Brownsville, PA 15417, USA.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/2.8
  • 1/128s
  • ISO125
  • 100mm