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Kleidocerys resedae vs privignus This comparison was created a while back for a Dutch forum and I just reworked it into a German version, so figured I might as well do an English one too :o)<br />
The status(!) and identification of these two &quot;species&quot; is highly problematic. Also, it should be noted that these are the two &quot;larger&quot; Kleidocerys spp and that there is a comparable pale/dark duo of &quot;smaller&quot; Kleidocerys spp (K. ericae and trucatulus).<br />
IF/WHEN (?!?) the two are seen as separate species, then K. resedae is considered to be the paler species, found mostly on Birch (but also on Alder!) and K. privignus is the darker species that develops on Alder. The discussion is highly complex and confusing, mostly because one of the leading publications on the subject (Carayon, 1989) is unclear/confusing in itself, as discussed here (in German):<br />
<a href="https://insektenfotos.de/forum/index.php?page=Thread&amp;postID=330401#post330401" rel="nofollow">https://insektenfotos.de/forum/index.php?page=Thread&amp;postID=330401#post330401</a><br />
The larger arrows point to the space between the second and third row of punctures on the clavus, that is supposed to be clearly contrasting dark in privignus, but on darker specimen of resedae the interpretation of this is highly influenced by viewing angle and lighting. To me the continuous streak of black on the hind margin of the corium is more helpful, but probably not 100% diagnostic either.  Heteroptera ID help,Kleidocerys,Kleidocerys privignus,Kleidocerys resedae,Lygaeidae,nl: Berkensmalsnuit,nl: Elzensmalsnuit Click/tap to enlarge

Kleidocerys resedae vs privignus

This comparison was created a while back for a Dutch forum and I just reworked it into a German version, so figured I might as well do an English one too :o)
The status(!) and identification of these two "species" is highly problematic. Also, it should be noted that these are the two "larger" Kleidocerys spp and that there is a comparable pale/dark duo of "smaller" Kleidocerys spp (K. ericae and trucatulus).
IF/WHEN (?!?) the two are seen as separate species, then K. resedae is considered to be the paler species, found mostly on Birch (but also on Alder!) and K. privignus is the darker species that develops on Alder. The discussion is highly complex and confusing, mostly because one of the leading publications on the subject (Carayon, 1989) is unclear/confusing in itself, as discussed here (in German):
https://insektenfotos.de/forum/index.php?page=Thread&postID=330401#post330401
The larger arrows point to the space between the second and third row of punctures on the clavus, that is supposed to be clearly contrasting dark in privignus, but on darker specimen of resedae the interpretation of this is highly influenced by viewing angle and lighting. To me the continuous streak of black on the hind margin of the corium is more helpful, but probably not 100% diagnostic either.

    comments (5)

  1. They are so similar! Posted one year ago
    1. Yes, there is some serious doubt that these would be valid species. Maybe we're looking at a speciation process in progress, or maybe they are just fenotypes based on a different host while growing up ?!? More research needed ... Posted one year ago
      1. interesting to consider that it could be in the progress of splitting! Posted one year ago
        1. Yes, that is pretty much what we have with things like Chrysperla carnea s.l. - near impossible to distinguish on morphology but almost 100% reproductive isolation based on mating song type. We often see also see such processes where a population of herbivores has adapted to a new host plant and may or may not still reproduce with populations from the old plant in the laboratory, but in practice the different niches will cause further specialization over time. A similar discussion is going on with some beetles in the genus Galerucella. Always good for heated discussions (bring on the popcorn!) :o) Posted one year ago
          1. Cool stuff! Posted one year ago

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Kleidocerys privignus is a bug in the Lygaeidae family.

Similar species: True Bugs
Species identified by Pudding4brains
View Pudding4brains's profile

By Pudding4brains

Public Domain
Uploaded Oct 21, 2018.