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Oak Mazegill - Daedalea quercina Flat, fan-shaped fruiting bodies with amazingly intricate maze-like pores that were very deep, thick, and fuzzy. Sizes ranged from 5-10 cm wide. <br />
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Habitat: Growing on rotting wood in a mixed forest.<br />
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The fruiting bodies of Daedalea quercina have some unusual uses. They can be used as a natural comb, especially for brushing horses with sensitive skin. In addition, the smoldering fruiting bodies may be used to anesthetize bees. This species has also been investigated for bioremediation, and for medicinal purposes.<br />
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<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67368/oak_mazegill_-_daedalea_quercina.html" title="Oak Mazegill - Daedalea quercina"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/67368_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1618444810&Signature=K0XsCJDtq5a%2FGXW8vrMGVs5UnaY%3D" width="200" height="160" alt="Oak Mazegill - Daedalea quercina Flat, fan-shaped fruiting bodies with amazingly intricate maze-like pores that were very deep, thick, and fuzzy. Sizes ranged from 5-10 cm wide. <br />
<br />
Habitat: Growing on rotting wood in a mixed forest.<br />
<br />
The fruiting bodies of Daedalea quercina have some unusual uses. They can be used as a natural comb, especially for brushing horses with sensitive skin. In addition, the smoldering fruiting bodies may be used to anesthetize bees. This species has also been investigated for bioremediation, and for medicinal purposes.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67369/oak_mazegill_-_daedalea_quercina.html Daedalea quercina,Fall,Geotagged,Oak mazegill,United States,fungus,mushroom" /></a></figure> Daedalea quercina,Fall,Geotagged,Oak mazegill,United States,fungus,mushroom Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Oak Mazegill - Daedalea quercina

Flat, fan-shaped fruiting bodies with amazingly intricate maze-like pores that were very deep, thick, and fuzzy. Sizes ranged from 5-10 cm wide.

Habitat: Growing on rotting wood in a mixed forest.

The fruiting bodies of Daedalea quercina have some unusual uses. They can be used as a natural comb, especially for brushing horses with sensitive skin. In addition, the smoldering fruiting bodies may be used to anesthetize bees. This species has also been investigated for bioremediation, and for medicinal purposes.

Oak Mazegill - Daedalea quercina Flat, fan-shaped fruiting bodies with amazingly intricate maze-like pores that were very deep, thick, and fuzzy. Sizes ranged from 5-10 cm wide. <br />
<br />
Habitat: Growing on rotting wood in a mixed forest.<br />
<br />
The fruiting bodies of Daedalea quercina have some unusual uses. They can be used as a natural comb, especially for brushing horses with sensitive skin. In addition, the smoldering fruiting bodies may be used to anesthetize bees. This species has also been investigated for bioremediation, and for medicinal purposes.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67369/oak_mazegill_-_daedalea_quercina.html Daedalea quercina,Fall,Geotagged,Oak mazegill,United States,fungus,mushroom

    comments (3)

  1. No wonder about the name: very appropriate! :-) Posted 2 years ago
    1. Yes, I was about to comment on how it made me think of a maze puzzle and only then read the name. Posted 2 years ago
      1. Definitely an appropriate name. You can't tell from this photo very well, but the gills are really deep. Posted 2 years ago

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''Daedalea quercina'' is a species of mushroom in the order Polyporales, and the type species of the genus ''Daedalea''. Commonly known as the oak mazegill or maze-gill fungus, the specific epithet refers to the oak genus ''Quercus'', upon which it frequently grows, causing a brown rot. It is found in Europe, Asia, Northern Africa and Australasia. Though inedible, it can be used as a natural comb and has been the subject of chemical research.

Similar species: Polyporales
Species identified by Christine Young
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By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Oct 6, 2018. Captured Oct 6, 2018 10:33 in 91 Main St, Sharon, CT 06069, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/5.0
  • 1/64s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm