JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Male Marpissa muscosa - posing, Heesch, Netherlands Henriette and I were having dinner inside the house when this little cutie was gliding down the sides of the table. I usually don&#039;t actively stage live insects, but I figured this one asked for it. I trapped it in a glass and put the glass on our table in the garden. It wouldn&#039;t cooperate and kept running frantically inside the glass so I gave it back its freedom, a fair level playing field where it could flee my attempt to photograph it. Luckily, it didn&#039;t immediately. Quite the contrary, it&#039;s a cocky one.<br />
<br />
It took me a long while to identify this one as the female seems to be much more often photographed. The male can be identified based on its smaller size, large black chelicerae (mouthparts), eye arrangement and pattern on the abdomen. Furthermore, finding it inside the house is another clue as this is one of few species in the Netherlands often encountered inhouse.<br />
<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67354/male_marpissa_muscosa_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Male Marpissa muscosa, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/67354_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1589414410&Signature=3%2BtDEcK%2BrboQW%2B68CwZrPvg6pKk%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Male Marpissa muscosa, Heesch, Netherlands Henriette and I were having dinner inside the house when this little cutie was gliding down the sides of the table. I usually don&#039;t actively stage live insects, but I figured this one asked for it. I trapped it in a glass and put the glass on our table in the garden. It wouldn&#039;t cooperate and kept running frantically inside the glass so I gave it back its freedom, a fair level playing field where it could flee my attempt to photograph it. Luckily, it didn&#039;t immediately. Quite the contrary, it&#039;s a cocky one.<br />
<br />
It took me a long while to identify this one as the female seems to be much more often photographed. The male can be identified based on its smaller size, large black chelicerae (mouthparts), eye arrangement and pattern on the abdomen. Furthermore, finding it inside the house is another clue as this is one of few species in the Netherlands often encountered inhouse.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67355/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67356/male_marpissa_muscosa_challenging_pose_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67357/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_posing_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67358/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_ii_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Heesch,Marpissa muscosa,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67355/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Male Marpissa muscosa - top view, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/67355_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1589414410&Signature=26VRALKt0OUhX4xThdDu38cchxg%3D" width="122" height="152" alt="Male Marpissa muscosa - top view, Heesch, Netherlands Henriette and I were having dinner inside the house when this little cutie was gliding down the sides of the table. I usually don&#039;t actively stage live insects, but I figured this one asked for it. I trapped it in a glass and put the glass on our table in the garden. It wouldn&#039;t cooperate and kept running frantically inside the glass so I gave it back its freedom, a fair level playing field where it could flee my attempt to photograph it. Luckily, it didn&#039;t immediately. Quite the contrary, it&#039;s a cocky one.<br />
<br />
It took me a long while to identify this one as the female seems to be much more often photographed. The male can be identified based on its smaller size, large black chelicerae (mouthparts), eye arrangement and pattern on the abdomen. Furthermore, finding it inside the house is another clue as this is one of few species in the Netherlands often encountered inhouse.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67354/male_marpissa_muscosa_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67356/male_marpissa_muscosa_challenging_pose_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67357/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_posing_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67358/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_ii_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Heesch,Marpissa muscosa,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67356/male_marpissa_muscosa_challenging_pose_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Male Marpissa muscosa, challenging pose, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/67356_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1589414410&Signature=aK8lAAs6NknWnP6hRux32SlNDwI%3D" width="148" height="152" alt="Male Marpissa muscosa, challenging pose, Heesch, Netherlands Henriette and I were having dinner inside the house when this little cutie was gliding down the sides of the table. I usually don&#039;t actively stage live insects, but I figured this one asked for it. I trapped it in a glass and put the glass on our table in the garden. It wouldn&#039;t cooperate and kept running frantically inside the glass so I gave it back its freedom, a fair level playing field where it could flee my attempt to photograph it. Luckily, it didn&#039;t immediately. Quite the contrary, it&#039;s a cocky one.<br />
<br />
It took me a long while to identify this one as the female seems to be much more often photographed. The male can be identified based on its smaller size, large black chelicerae (mouthparts), eye arrangement and pattern on the abdomen. Furthermore, finding it inside the house is another clue as this is one of few species in the Netherlands often encountered inhouse.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67354/male_marpissa_muscosa_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67355/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67357/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_posing_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67358/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_ii_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Heesch,Marpissa muscosa,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67358/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_ii_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Male Marpissa muscosa - top view II, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/67358_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1589414410&Signature=aDFQVTUNz0W85mabfaSmpTT%2FZjs%3D" width="200" height="166" alt="Male Marpissa muscosa - top view II, Heesch, Netherlands Henriette and I were having dinner inside the house when this little cutie was gliding down the sides of the table. I usually don&#039;t actively stage live insects, but I figured this one asked for it. I trapped it in a glass and put the glass on our table in the garden. It wouldn&#039;t cooperate and kept running frantically inside the glass so I gave it back its freedom, a fair level playing field where it could flee my attempt to photograph it. Luckily, it didn&#039;t immediately. Quite the contrary, it&#039;s a cocky one.<br />
<br />
It took me a long while to identify this one as the female seems to be much more often photographed. The male can be identified based on its smaller size, large black chelicerae (mouthparts), eye arrangement and pattern on the abdomen. Furthermore, finding it inside the house is another clue as this is one of few species in the Netherlands often encountered inhouse.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67354/male_marpissa_muscosa_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67355/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67356/male_marpissa_muscosa_challenging_pose_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67357/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_posing_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Heesch,Marpissa muscosa,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure> Europe,Heesch,Marpissa muscosa,Netherlands,World Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Male Marpissa muscosa - posing, Heesch, Netherlands

Henriette and I were having dinner inside the house when this little cutie was gliding down the sides of the table. I usually don't actively stage live insects, but I figured this one asked for it. I trapped it in a glass and put the glass on our table in the garden. It wouldn't cooperate and kept running frantically inside the glass so I gave it back its freedom, a fair level playing field where it could flee my attempt to photograph it. Luckily, it didn't immediately. Quite the contrary, it's a cocky one.

It took me a long while to identify this one as the female seems to be much more often photographed. The male can be identified based on its smaller size, large black chelicerae (mouthparts), eye arrangement and pattern on the abdomen. Furthermore, finding it inside the house is another clue as this is one of few species in the Netherlands often encountered inhouse.

Male Marpissa muscosa, Heesch, Netherlands Henriette and I were having dinner inside the house when this little cutie was gliding down the sides of the table. I usually don't actively stage live insects, but I figured this one asked for it. I trapped it in a glass and put the glass on our table in the garden. It wouldn't cooperate and kept running frantically inside the glass so I gave it back its freedom, a fair level playing field where it could flee my attempt to photograph it. Luckily, it didn't immediately. Quite the contrary, it's a cocky one.<br />
<br />
It took me a long while to identify this one as the female seems to be much more often photographed. The male can be identified based on its smaller size, large black chelicerae (mouthparts), eye arrangement and pattern on the abdomen. Furthermore, finding it inside the house is another clue as this is one of few species in the Netherlands often encountered inhouse.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67355/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67356/male_marpissa_muscosa_challenging_pose_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67357/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_posing_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67358/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_ii_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Heesch,Marpissa muscosa,Netherlands,World

Male Marpissa muscosa - top view, Heesch, Netherlands Henriette and I were having dinner inside the house when this little cutie was gliding down the sides of the table. I usually don't actively stage live insects, but I figured this one asked for it. I trapped it in a glass and put the glass on our table in the garden. It wouldn't cooperate and kept running frantically inside the glass so I gave it back its freedom, a fair level playing field where it could flee my attempt to photograph it. Luckily, it didn't immediately. Quite the contrary, it's a cocky one.<br />
<br />
It took me a long while to identify this one as the female seems to be much more often photographed. The male can be identified based on its smaller size, large black chelicerae (mouthparts), eye arrangement and pattern on the abdomen. Furthermore, finding it inside the house is another clue as this is one of few species in the Netherlands often encountered inhouse.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67354/male_marpissa_muscosa_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67356/male_marpissa_muscosa_challenging_pose_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67357/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_posing_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67358/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_ii_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Heesch,Marpissa muscosa,Netherlands,World

Male Marpissa muscosa, challenging pose, Heesch, Netherlands Henriette and I were having dinner inside the house when this little cutie was gliding down the sides of the table. I usually don't actively stage live insects, but I figured this one asked for it. I trapped it in a glass and put the glass on our table in the garden. It wouldn't cooperate and kept running frantically inside the glass so I gave it back its freedom, a fair level playing field where it could flee my attempt to photograph it. Luckily, it didn't immediately. Quite the contrary, it's a cocky one.<br />
<br />
It took me a long while to identify this one as the female seems to be much more often photographed. The male can be identified based on its smaller size, large black chelicerae (mouthparts), eye arrangement and pattern on the abdomen. Furthermore, finding it inside the house is another clue as this is one of few species in the Netherlands often encountered inhouse.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67354/male_marpissa_muscosa_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67355/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67357/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_posing_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67358/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_ii_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Heesch,Marpissa muscosa,Netherlands,World

Male Marpissa muscosa - top view II, Heesch, Netherlands Henriette and I were having dinner inside the house when this little cutie was gliding down the sides of the table. I usually don't actively stage live insects, but I figured this one asked for it. I trapped it in a glass and put the glass on our table in the garden. It wouldn't cooperate and kept running frantically inside the glass so I gave it back its freedom, a fair level playing field where it could flee my attempt to photograph it. Luckily, it didn't immediately. Quite the contrary, it's a cocky one.<br />
<br />
It took me a long while to identify this one as the female seems to be much more often photographed. The male can be identified based on its smaller size, large black chelicerae (mouthparts), eye arrangement and pattern on the abdomen. Furthermore, finding it inside the house is another clue as this is one of few species in the Netherlands often encountered inhouse.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67354/male_marpissa_muscosa_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67355/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_top_view_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67356/male_marpissa_muscosa_challenging_pose_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/67357/male_marpissa_muscosa_-_posing_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Heesch,Marpissa muscosa,Netherlands,World

    comments (5)

  1. Super sharp shot Ferdy, love these spiders, they are so interesting. Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks so much, Stuart! They are hands-down my favorite macro subject :) Posted one year ago
      1. I was effectively playing hide and seek with one yesterday, I had to give up in the end as it ran up the oleander stalk. Was still amusing, even if it was frustrating! Posted one year ago
        1. I have very similar experiences with most jumping spiders. I think that in this case, the spider paused for a few moments as it did not have an immediate or straightforward escape path down from this high table.

          The zebra spider seems to be behavioral exception that is actively curious and you can even feed it.

          Sideview closeup of a Zebra Spider  Europe,Geotagged,Heesch,Macro,Netherlands,Salticus scenicus,Spring,Zebra spider
          Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
  2. My favorite of the series! Posted one year ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

''Marpissa muscosa'' is a species of jumping spider.

Females reach about 8–11 mm length, males only 6–8 mm. Both sexes are coloured grey to brown. The whole spider has a furry appearance and is flattened in shape.

The species builds a kind of nest under the bark of dead trees. Up to 100 of these nests can occur side by side. This spider has a hierarchy: weaker animals will show their inferiority by strutting their front legs and slowly receding from the scene.

Similar species: Spiders
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Oct 6, 2018. Captured Aug 8, 2018 18:37.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/16.0
  • 1/60s
  • ISO64
  • 105mm