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Sea of Flowers, Berlicum, Netherlands I was happily surprised to see that a local  farmer had decided to leave a narrow strip of his corn field unused, and actively seeded it with flowers. The strip is narrow, about 10m deep, yet very lengthy, at about 500m. Every single inch of it was crowded with flowers, an explosion of color. I failed to capture it properly as I was in a hurry.<br />
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I&#039;m still a bit torn on this initiative. I recognize the specific combination of flowers as those commonly found in cheap mixed flower seeds that I&#039;ve used in the garden myself a few years back. Diversity is a bit low, and it has several introduced species, instead of native ones. I&#039;m also not sure if the ultra high concentration used here is good or bad.<br />
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For now, I&#039;d say it&#039;s a net positive. At least somebody cared enough to try and do something good, and it beats crop monoculture. Perhaps it also helps against the drastic decline in insect populations found in our country. The decline is largely caused by the lack of native wild flowers getting a chance to grow. Berlicum,Europe,Netherlands,World Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Sea of Flowers, Berlicum, Netherlands

I was happily surprised to see that a local farmer had decided to leave a narrow strip of his corn field unused, and actively seeded it with flowers. The strip is narrow, about 10m deep, yet very lengthy, at about 500m. Every single inch of it was crowded with flowers, an explosion of color. I failed to capture it properly as I was in a hurry.

I'm still a bit torn on this initiative. I recognize the specific combination of flowers as those commonly found in cheap mixed flower seeds that I've used in the garden myself a few years back. Diversity is a bit low, and it has several introduced species, instead of native ones. I'm also not sure if the ultra high concentration used here is good or bad.

For now, I'd say it's a net positive. At least somebody cared enough to try and do something good, and it beats crop monoculture. Perhaps it also helps against the drastic decline in insect populations found in our country. The decline is largely caused by the lack of native wild flowers getting a chance to grow.

    comments (3)

  1. It sure is beautiful, and I agree that it's encouraging that someone is at least trying to help and has good intentions. Would it be a "no-no" for you to spread some native seeds in there...covertly? Posted one year ago
    1. Maybe it should, although this is quite a large stoke of land, would take many pounds of it, plus all of this is now already in the ground. Not sure which seed would "win" :) Posted one year ago
      1. Eh, good point. Lots of invasives tend to "win" out over the natives. Posted one year ago

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By Ferdy Christant

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Uploaded Sep 29, 2018. Captured Aug 4, 2018 15:27.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/13.0
  • 1/60s
  • ISO64
  • 105mm