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Bow to the queen This mantid afforded me a perfect opportunity to examine it in detail and take ventral images....it was in repose, leaning back in an almost horizontal position. It was not in the classically defensive position at that moment. <br />
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And what breathtaking raptorial forelegs. Surely one of nature&#039;s most impressive insect predators.<br />
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6 cm<br />
 Archimantis latistyla,Australia,Australian ghost hopper mantis,Geotagged,Large brown mantis,Macro,Mantodea,Predator,Spring,bunny mantis,fauna,hunter,insect,invertebrate,new south wales,praying mantis,spines Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Bow to the queen

This mantid afforded me a perfect opportunity to examine it in detail and take ventral images....it was in repose, leaning back in an almost horizontal position. It was not in the classically defensive position at that moment.

And what breathtaking raptorial forelegs. Surely one of nature's most impressive insect predators.

6 cm

    comments (6)

  1. WOW!! What a stunning shot! Posted 2 years ago
  2. That's incredible! Posted 2 years ago
  3. Brilliant composition! Posted 2 years ago
  4. Super macro photography . Looking at the forelegs with all the sharp spines, one can imagine what a poor victim feels befor it gets devoured . Posted 2 years ago
  5. Breath-taking shot Ruth. Posted 8 months ago
    1. Appreciate that, thanks Paul. I'd never seen one 'resting' in this position before, leaning so far back and holding that stance. Posted 8 months ago

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''Archimantis latistyla'', commonly known as the large brown mantis is a species of mantid native to Australia. The large brown mantis has two subspecies, a widespread subspecies and the stick mantis ghost from Bundabergs Turtle Sands. The stick mantis ghosts are not as aggressive as the widespread species but have a defense display used to make the mantis appear larger by flinging its front legs into the air and putting its head down along with its antennae. Large brown mantids are light brown.. more

Similar species: Mantises
Species identified by Ruth Spigelman
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By Ruth Spigelman

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Uploaded Sep 26, 2018. Captured Sep 25, 2018 11:11 in 65 Nesca Parade, The Hill NSW 2300, Australia.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/10.0
  • 1/99s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm