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Hippopsis cf. truncatella - Hippopsis Longhorn / Serra-Pau Hippopsis (Bates, 1866) Coleoptera: Polyphaga: Cucujiformia: Chrysomeloidea: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae: Agapanthiini<br />
<br />
Body length: ~8,1-11mm<br />
Date: 5th of March, 2017 at 08:39:07pm<br />
Location: Brazil, Santa Catarina, Benedito Novo (Lat: -26.77, Long: -49.36)<br />
<br />
Hippopsis is a genus of longhorn beetles in the order Coleoptera, suborder Polyphaga, infraorder Cucujiformia, superfamily Chrysomeloidea, family Cerambycidae, subfamily Lamiinae and tribe Agapanthiini.<br />
<br />
At first I believed this was a H. lemniscata lemniscata but saw the genus Hippopsicon. Cesar nailed the riddle harder than me, giving a third, more probable option: Hippopsis cf. truncatella.<br />
<br />
Hippopsicon (links in the comments) is an African genus so, unless they were introduced here, the likeliness of this being one is close to zero. H. lemniscata lemniscata also seems incorrect due to distribution status. However, the genus Hippopsis (link in the comments) seems correct. Running the Martins &amp; Galileo (2006) key Cesar kindly provided  (<a href="http://www.scielo.br/pdf/rbent/v50n4/07.pdf)" rel="nofollow">http://www.scielo.br/pdf/rbent/v50n4/07.pdf)</a>, H. truncatella along with other Hippopsis seem to be present in the state of Santa Catarina, all of which H. truncatella seems to better match morphologically through visual aspects (link in the comments).<br />
<br />
The key mentions smaller dimmensions with a length of around 8,1-10,6mm, but other sources indicate a length of around 11mm. Pronotum lacks gibbosities.<br />
<br />
Antennae measuring around 3 times the body&#039;s size. Four longitudinal light stripes could be seen on the pronotum and on the elytra. Elytral extremities are pointy. The prothorax is longer than large; pronotum without elevations; metepisternum coated by a yellowish, dense pubescence; sides of metasternum with a yellowish pubescent stripe away from the external border; urosternites with whitish pubescent bands on the sides; procoxae lack tubercles.<br />
<br />
Their larvae are known to bury in fallen wood, so far as the translation is correct: <a href="https://id.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippopsis_truncatella" rel="nofollow">https://id.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippopsis_truncatella</a><br />
<br />
Hippopsis are incredible little Cerambycids. They seem to be parasitize slender branches of trees. They choose the most slender twigs to cling to closely by their short, stout legs, and elongate claws to be of difficult detection; a great defensive mechanism against predation.<br />
<br />
The first described species in Hippopsis was in the genus Saperda (Fabricius, 1775: Saperda lemniscata, Fabricius, 1801) in the United States.<br />
<br />
Hippopsis truncatella are known to be distributed in Venezuela, Brasil (Roraima, Amazonas, Par&aacute;, Rond&ocirc;nia, Mato Grosso, Goi&aacute;s, Mato Grosso do Sul, Maranh&atilde;o, Bahia, Minas Gerais, Esp&iacute;rito Santo, Rio de Janeiro, S&atilde;o Paulo, Santa Catarina) and Bolivia (Santa Cruz) - <a href="https://www.gbif.org/species/134031304" rel="nofollow">https://www.gbif.org/species/134031304</a><br />
<br />
Habitats include woodlands, gardens and places with dense vegetation and plenty of wood undergoing decay.<br />
<br />
I do not know if they have host preferences. Additional details are welcome. Agapanthiini,Animalia,Arthropoda,Arthropods,Brazil,Coleoptera,Cucujiformia,Geotagged,Hippopsis,Hippopsis truncatella,Insecta,Insects,Lamiinae,Polyphaga,Summer,animal,animals,arthropod,cerambycidae,insect Click/tap to enlarge Species introCountry intro

Hippopsis cf. truncatella - Hippopsis Longhorn / Serra-Pau Hippopsis (Bates, 1866)

Coleoptera: Polyphaga: Cucujiformia: Chrysomeloidea: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae: Agapanthiini

Body length: ~8,1-11mm
Date: 5th of March, 2017 at 08:39:07pm
Location: Brazil, Santa Catarina, Benedito Novo (Lat: -26.77, Long: -49.36)

Hippopsis is a genus of longhorn beetles in the order Coleoptera, suborder Polyphaga, infraorder Cucujiformia, superfamily Chrysomeloidea, family Cerambycidae, subfamily Lamiinae and tribe Agapanthiini.

At first I believed this was a H. lemniscata lemniscata but saw the genus Hippopsicon. Cesar nailed the riddle harder than me, giving a third, more probable option: Hippopsis cf. truncatella.

Hippopsicon (links in the comments) is an African genus so, unless they were introduced here, the likeliness of this being one is close to zero. H. lemniscata lemniscata also seems incorrect due to distribution status. However, the genus Hippopsis (link in the comments) seems correct. Running the Martins & Galileo (2006) key Cesar kindly provided (http://www.scielo.br/pdf/rbent/v50n4/07.pdf), H. truncatella along with other Hippopsis seem to be present in the state of Santa Catarina, all of which H. truncatella seems to better match morphologically through visual aspects (link in the comments).

The key mentions smaller dimmensions with a length of around 8,1-10,6mm, but other sources indicate a length of around 11mm. Pronotum lacks gibbosities.

Antennae measuring around 3 times the body's size. Four longitudinal light stripes could be seen on the pronotum and on the elytra. Elytral extremities are pointy. The prothorax is longer than large; pronotum without elevations; metepisternum coated by a yellowish, dense pubescence; sides of metasternum with a yellowish pubescent stripe away from the external border; urosternites with whitish pubescent bands on the sides; procoxae lack tubercles.

Their larvae are known to bury in fallen wood, so far as the translation is correct: https://id.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippopsis_truncatella

Hippopsis are incredible little Cerambycids. They seem to be parasitize slender branches of trees. They choose the most slender twigs to cling to closely by their short, stout legs, and elongate claws to be of difficult detection; a great defensive mechanism against predation.

The first described species in Hippopsis was in the genus Saperda (Fabricius, 1775: Saperda lemniscata, Fabricius, 1801) in the United States.

Hippopsis truncatella are known to be distributed in Venezuela, Brasil (Roraima, Amazonas, Pará, Rondônia, Mato Grosso, Goiás, Mato Grosso do Sul, Maranhão, Bahia, Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Santa Catarina) and Bolivia (Santa Cruz) - https://www.gbif.org/species/134031304

Habitats include woodlands, gardens and places with dense vegetation and plenty of wood undergoing decay.

I do not know if they have host preferences. Additional details are welcome.

    comments (11)

  1. That is so interesting, and they have such impressive antennae!! Posted 9 months ago
    1. I just wanted to add one cool thing - you have added 69 species to JungleDragon, and 55 of those were new to the website! That's incredible! Posted 9 months ago
      1. I can only agree, and the level of details and notes regarding identification is stunning. Posted 9 months ago
        1. Thank you guys! I have over 30.000 to contribute yet. I'll have to stay away for a few days now to rearrange my life. You can be sure I will be back, though! Actually, tomorrow I might post one of my older pictures. Posts that are already made are easier to manage elsewhere, even though I use an specific format on JungleDragon, just as I do with every website. I will try something tomorrow Posted 9 months ago
          1. 30.000!? Oh wow, hope you will ultimately share them all here :) Posted 9 months ago
            1. Yup, all my posts I post here as well, except the ones pre-JungleDragon which I will be slowly posting to catch up as well. The problem is the ammount, 30,000 posts, assuming one per day would take decades, so my lifespan is the issue as this number in a year will probably turn to 45,000 registers; a lot of them are unique and never before shared by anyone. So I've nominated someone to do this work once my ages pass. Like a living legacy. Posted 9 months ago
              1. Haha, what a legacy it is :) Posted 9 months ago
              2. I love seeing your posts Oscar and look forward to many thousands more! Não duvide do seu valor ;) Posted 9 months ago
  2. Sometimes I doubt my value and worth in this planet. I'm glad you can see a good part about me. Guess my value can be relative. I will be making a post shortly. Thank you Posted 9 months ago
    1. There are countless good parts about you, Oscar! Your value is inherent and your contributions are a gift :) Posted 9 months ago

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''Hippopsis truncatella'' is a species of beetle in the family Cerambycidae. It was described by Bates in 1866.

Similar species: Beetles
Species identified by Oscar Neto
View Oscar Neto's profile

By Oscar Neto

All rights reserved
Uploaded Sep 22, 2018. Captured Mar 5, 2017 20:39 in R. Cruz e Souza, 493 - Centro, Benedito Novo - SC, 89124-000, Brazil.
  • SM-J320M
  • f/2.2
  • 1/15s
  • ISO64
  • 3.3mm