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Yellow Passionflower (Passiflora lutea) The yellow passionflower are finally in bloom! At the base of a ridge at the edge of a dense mixed hardwood/coniferous forest in NW Georgia (Gordon County), US. <br />
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Note: These flowers are quite small compared to other passionflower species (only about 1-1.5 cm in diameter).<br />
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Unfortunately, a huge storm was on the way when I took this shot. It was rather dark out and the lightning had already started (so I was rushed to get some photos in before we left our land). Geotagged,Passiflora lutea,Summer,United States Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Yellow Passionflower (Passiflora lutea)

The yellow passionflower are finally in bloom! At the base of a ridge at the edge of a dense mixed hardwood/coniferous forest in NW Georgia (Gordon County), US.

Note: These flowers are quite small compared to other passionflower species (only about 1-1.5 cm in diameter).

Unfortunately, a huge storm was on the way when I took this shot. It was rather dark out and the lightning had already started (so I was rushed to get some photos in before we left our land).

    comments (16)

  1. I love his shot! Posted 4 months ago
    1. Thank you so much! That means the world to me! <3 Posted 4 months ago
  2. Gasp! Gorgeous! When I first saw this shot, I thought it was one of Ferdy's stacks! Fantastic shot, Lisa!

    Is this on your land? If yes, beware of honesuckle - it can be a real problem for passionflower natives.
    Posted 4 months ago
    1. Indeed. The vine is growing over a pine log at the very base of our dirt driveway (right at the edge of the forest). I've been keeping an eye on it for several weeks now, waiting on blooms!

      As for honeysuckle, my neighbors have a bit of a problem with it on their roadsides, so I'm going to have to keep a close eye on it. Invasives drive me crazy! Luckily, there aren't many invasives near our driveway at this point.
      Posted 4 months ago
      1. Oh, yay that it is on your property! Are you going to harvest any of the fruit. I have read that this species isn't very tasty. Did you know that you can make ink from this plant - from the seeds, maybe? Posted 4 months ago
        1. I had no idea about the ink! I will definitely give them a try (after I photograph their fruited form)! :D Posted 4 months ago
    2. Please don't insult Lisa with my stacks ;)

      @Lisa: well, your modesty shines through as you apologized for conditions and what not. There's nothing wrong with this photo, it's excellent.
      Posted 4 months ago
      1. Lol, Ferdy - I think your stacks are awesome :)


        Posted 4 months ago
        1. I appreciate the compliments very much, but as a beginner I still find it a frustrating process where I don't control the result enough yet. Very time consuming, high failure rate, and even the "good" ones I'm not happy with. All in good time though :) Posted 4 months ago
          1. ...sounds like you may have a condition called "perfectionism"...Obviously, I'm not an expert - but, your stacks are really good and will only continue to improve with practice! Posted 4 months ago
            1. Let's hope so. I do have a tendency to look up, here's a nice source of inspiration regarding stacking:
              https://inglesphoto.com/View-Photos-and--Prints/Flower-Photographs/1/thumbs
              Posted 4 months ago
          2. I'm in agreement that your stacks are downright gorgeous. Posted 4 months ago
      2. Awww! Thanks, Ferdy! I will ALWAYS find something wrong with my photos! :D Posted 4 months ago
        1. Me too lol :) Posted 4 months ago
  3. Great capture, Lisa Posted 4 months ago
    1. Thank you so much! <3 Posted 4 months ago

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''Passiflora lutea'', the yellow passionflower, is a flowering plant in the family Passifloraceae, native North America, in the eastern and south-central parts of the United States from Pennsylvania west to Kansas, and south to Florida and Texas. It is the northernmost species of ''Passiflora'', occurring slightly further north than ''P. incarnata'', and tolerant of winter temperatures down to −15 °C, and even −30 °C for short periods.

It is a perennial herbaceous climbing or.. more

Similar species: Malpighiales
Species identified by Lisa Kimmerling
View Lisa Kimmerling's profile

By Lisa Kimmerling

All rights reserved
Uploaded Aug 9, 2018. Captured Aug 8, 2018 04:12 in 233 Hopewell Dr, Ranger, GA 30734, USA.
  • Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
  • f/4.0
  • 1/60s
  • ISO400
  • 60mm