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Rough-nosed horned lizard, Kottawa, Sri Lanka I went with a resident herpetologist to Kottawa forest reserve to find C. aspera and we were able to find this single female with eggs. It was perched on a tree root on by the forest floor.  Ceratophora aspera,Lizard,Lizards,Reptiles,Rough-nosed horned lizard,Sri Lanka,animal,animals,reptile Click/tap to enlarge Species introCountry intro

Rough-nosed horned lizard, Kottawa, Sri Lanka

I went with a resident herpetologist to Kottawa forest reserve to find C. aspera and we were able to find this single female with eggs. It was perched on a tree root on by the forest floor.

    comments (8)

  1. Hope you don't mind, I've asked John for his opinion on this one:

    John SullivanJohn Sullivan

    There's no long snout. Could be a juvenile but I'd like to have it checked. To be clear, I really hope it is correct because it would be a very nice endemic find!
    Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
    1. It seems that adult females either have no rostral appendage, or a much reduced one. A paper on the reproductive behavior of this species (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/279206798_REPRODUCTIVE_BEHAVIOR_OF_THE_VULNERABLE_ROUGH_NOSE_HORNED_LIZARD_Ceratophora_aspera_SAURIA_AGAMIDAE_FROM_SRI_LANKA) shows a female laying eggs, and she has no noticeable rostral appendage. So the lack of that appendage doesn't rule out Ceratophora aspera, and I don't see anything else about this photo that seems significantly different from the female photographed in that paper.

      That said, there are a lot of roughly similar-looking agamid species in Sri Lanka, and I definitely do not know enough about them to make a confident ID.
      Posted one year ago
      1. Thanks for chiming in, John. Since the ID is not ruled out and the local guide did confirm it as this species, I'd say it's safe to keep it as-is. Posted one year ago
    2. Of course! Thank you both! I went to Kottawa to look for C. aspera with a resident herpetologist and he also ID-ed it as such. The Ceratophora's are actually quite distinct. C. aspera and karuii are similar, but even those two can be told apart since Karuii has patterns along its back. Posted one year ago
      1. "I went to Kottawa to look for C. aspera with a resident herpetologist and he also ID-ed it as such."

        Thank you, I generally put a lot of confidence in local experts, so it would have been useful to provide this information in the description in the first place. Not only would it be useful to judge confidence in the ID, it would also be educational, as well as fun to see how you went about things.

        So don't be shy in the description, we'd very much like to learn how you found it, any behavior witnessed, how you came to an ID, etc. Hope you're willing to consider this for future posts.
        Posted one year ago
        1. Apologies for not mentioning that earlier. I'll add a description on this one soon and I'll try to do it for future posts. I can attest to this guides credibility since he has been working with Sri Lankan herps for a while. Posted one year ago
          1. No need to apologize, it was just a suggestion. Thanks! Posted one year ago
  2. I recently returned from Sri Lanka and found all of the Ceratophora species *except* this one. I’ll upload some pictures soon! Posted one month ago

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The rough-nosed horned lizard is an Agamid lizard from Sri Lanka in lowland dipterocarp forests and secondary forests in the wet zone. It is distinguished from all the other ''Ceratophora'' species by the presence of a complex rostral appendage, comprising more scales than rostral scale alone. The lateral body scales are small and more or less regular shape.

Similar species: Scaled Reptiles
Species identified by ShanelleAW
View ShanelleAW's profile

By ShanelleAW

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jul 17, 2018. Captured Jul 16, 2018 06:00.
  • Canon EOS 7D
  • f/8.0
  • 1/128s
  • ISO1250
  • 400mm