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Blue Passion Flower macro, Heesch, Netherlands About 2 weeks ago, I noticed how our neighbour&#039;s passion flower plant, which grows several meters during a single summer, has made an entry into our garden by &quot;climbing&quot; over the fence. Great, because they are wonderful flowers. I made a note to myself that as soon as I have time, I will try a focus shifting stack on one of the flowers. As I was rather busy, each day I would just observe if the flower is still there, because a single flower was blossoming. <br />
<br />
Yes, it was still there each day for the whole 2 weeks. Except that it wasn&#039;t, because I&#039;ve now learned that passion flowers bloom for a single day. In other words, I was looking at a different flower every single day. Quite a mindf***?<br />
<br />
Anyway, bear with me a little as I am inexperienced in focus stacking. I&#039;ve made tons of mistakes and I&#039;m still not happy with these results, but you have to start somewhere. This is an in-house scene (every outdoor shot failed horribly due to wind) with the flower on a clamp, and a flash light for top lighting. My camera is flat on the table and I&#039;m using the Nikon D850&#039;s inbuilt focus shifting mode, where you simply enter the number of steps and the size of each step. The background was initially not this dark yet I had to apply some brushes due to halo effects as part of the stacking process. <br />
<br />
And oh yes, about passion flowers. As said, they bloom for a single day. Another remarkable fact is regarding the mimicry of some species. Butterflies using this flower as a host plant to deposit eggs, first check if another butterfly did not already deposited eggs, to avoid cannibalism. The passion flower has a brilliant defense: it contains a mimic of these butterfly eggs: small, orange round bulbs that looks like eggs, but are purely a misleading appendage. <br />
<br />
Some different crops:<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63001/blue_passion_flower_macro_-_ii_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Blue Passion Flower macro - II, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/63001_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1571270410&Signature=Lnbd4LnHpZKHHhx98nKhe6qpy40%3D" width="134" height="152" alt="Blue Passion Flower macro - II, Heesch, Netherlands About 2 weeks ago, I noticed how our neighbour&#039;s passion flower plant, which grows several meters during a single summer, has made an entry into our garden by &quot;climbing&quot; over the fence. Great, because they are wonderful flowers. I made a note to myself that as soon as I have time, I will try a focus shifting stack on one of the flowers. As I was rather busy, each day I would just observe if the flower is still there, because a single flower was blossoming. <br />
<br />
Yes, it was still there each day for the whole 2 weeks. Except that it wasn&#039;t, because I&#039;ve now learned that passion flowers bloom for a single day. In other words, I was looking at a different flower every single day. Quite a mindf***?<br />
<br />
Anyway, bear with me a little as I am inexperienced in focus stacking. I&#039;ve made tons of mistakes and I&#039;m still not happy with these results, but you have to start somewhere. This is an in-house scene (every outdoor shot failed horribly due to wind) with the flower on a clamp, and a flash light for top lighting. My camera is flat on the table and I&#039;m using the Nikon D850&#039;s inbuilt focus shifting mode, where you simply enter the number of steps and the size of each step. The background was initially not this dark yet I had to apply some brushes due to halo effects as part of the stacking process. <br />
<br />
And oh yes, about passion flowers. As said, they bloom for a single day. Another remarkable fact is regarding the mimicry of some species. Butterflies using this flower as a host plant to deposit eggs, first check if another butterfly did not already deposited eggs, to avoid cannibalism. The passion flower has a brilliant defense: it contains a mimic of these butterfly eggs: small, orange round bulbs that looks like eggs, but are purely a misleading appendage. <br />
<br />
Some different crops:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62997/blue_passion_flower_macro_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63002/blue_passion_flower_macro_-_iii_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
<br />
Different experiments:<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63005/white_flower_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63007/flower_stack_heesch_netherlands.html Blue Passion Flower,Europe,Focus Shift,Focus Stack,Heesch,Netherlands,Passiflora caerulea,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63002/blue_passion_flower_macro_-_iii_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Blue Passion Flower macro - III, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/63002_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1571270410&Signature=P5nfnIg1vTeUIz7p53JWVMQjdgk%3D" width="200" height="140" alt="Blue Passion Flower macro - III, Heesch, Netherlands About 2 weeks ago, I noticed how our neighbour&#039;s passion flower plant, which grows several meters during a single summer, has made an entry into our garden by &quot;climbing&quot; over the fence. Great, because they are wonderful flowers. I made a note to myself that as soon as I have time, I will try a focus shifting stack on one of the flowers. As I was rather busy, each day I would just observe if the flower is still there, because a single flower was blossoming. <br />
<br />
Yes, it was still there each day for the whole 2 weeks. Except that it wasn&#039;t, because I&#039;ve now learned that passion flowers bloom for a single day. In other words, I was looking at a different flower every single day. Quite a mindf***?<br />
<br />
Anyway, bear with me a little as I am inexperienced in focus stacking. I&#039;ve made tons of mistakes and I&#039;m still not happy with these results, but you have to start somewhere. This is an in-house scene (every outdoor shot failed horribly due to wind) with the flower on a clamp, and a flash light for top lighting. My camera is flat on the table and I&#039;m using the Nikon D850&#039;s inbuilt focus shifting mode, where you simply enter the number of steps and the size of each step. The background was initially not this dark yet I had to apply some brushes due to halo effects as part of the stacking process. <br />
<br />
And oh yes, about passion flowers. As said, they bloom for a single day. Another remarkable fact is regarding the mimicry of some species. Butterflies using this flower as a host plant to deposit eggs, first check if another butterfly did not already deposited eggs, to avoid cannibalism. The passion flower has a brilliant defense: it contains a mimic of these butterfly eggs: small, orange round bulbs that looks like eggs, but are purely a misleading appendage. <br />
<br />
Some different crops:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62997/blue_passion_flower_macro_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63001/blue_passion_flower_macro_-_ii_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
<br />
Different experiments:<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63005/white_flower_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63007/flower_stack_heesch_netherlands.html Blue Passion Flower,Europe,Focus Shift,Focus Stack,Heesch,Netherlands,Passiflora caerulea,World" /></a></figure><br />
<br />
Different experiments:<br />
<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63005/white_flower_heesch_netherlands.html" title="White flower, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/63005_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1571270410&Signature=8rKgsztaPyEZ8prOgnp33rwKC90%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="White flower, Heesch, Netherlands Another example of a focus shift stack done on a tiny flower taken from our garden. Unfortunately, I have no idea what type of flower it is. In this case I used a high key process to get rid of halos, although you can still see some traces of it.<br />
<br />
Some more experiments done on this day:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62997/blue_passion_flower_macro_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63003/blue_passion_flower_-_core_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63007/flower_stack_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Focus Shift,Focus Stack,Heesch,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63007/flower_stack_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Flower stack, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/63007_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1571270410&Signature=FFDYpQWmjFBpoUuT7rBIVzg9Evc%3D" width="200" height="162" alt="Flower stack, Heesch, Netherlands Another example of a focus shift stack done on a tiny flower taken from our garden. Unfortunately, I have no idea what type of flower it is. I really love the lighting in this one, but as you can see it suffers from strong halo effects around the edges. In this case it was too difficult to clean up. Halo is a result of focus stacking software being inaccurate in trying to determine which part of a single shot in a stack is sharp. <br />
<br />
Some more experiments done on this day:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62997/blue_passion_flower_macro_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63003/blue_passion_flower_-_core_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63005/white_flower_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Focus Stack,Heesch,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure> Europe,Focus Shift,Focus Stack,Heesch,Netherlands,Passiflora caerulea,World Click/tap to enlarge PromotedCountry intro

Blue Passion Flower macro, Heesch, Netherlands

About 2 weeks ago, I noticed how our neighbour's passion flower plant, which grows several meters during a single summer, has made an entry into our garden by "climbing" over the fence. Great, because they are wonderful flowers. I made a note to myself that as soon as I have time, I will try a focus shifting stack on one of the flowers. As I was rather busy, each day I would just observe if the flower is still there, because a single flower was blossoming.

Yes, it was still there each day for the whole 2 weeks. Except that it wasn't, because I've now learned that passion flowers bloom for a single day. In other words, I was looking at a different flower every single day. Quite a mindf***?

Anyway, bear with me a little as I am inexperienced in focus stacking. I've made tons of mistakes and I'm still not happy with these results, but you have to start somewhere. This is an in-house scene (every outdoor shot failed horribly due to wind) with the flower on a clamp, and a flash light for top lighting. My camera is flat on the table and I'm using the Nikon D850's inbuilt focus shifting mode, where you simply enter the number of steps and the size of each step. The background was initially not this dark yet I had to apply some brushes due to halo effects as part of the stacking process.

And oh yes, about passion flowers. As said, they bloom for a single day. Another remarkable fact is regarding the mimicry of some species. Butterflies using this flower as a host plant to deposit eggs, first check if another butterfly did not already deposited eggs, to avoid cannibalism. The passion flower has a brilliant defense: it contains a mimic of these butterfly eggs: small, orange round bulbs that looks like eggs, but are purely a misleading appendage.

Some different crops:

Blue Passion Flower macro - II, Heesch, Netherlands About 2 weeks ago, I noticed how our neighbour's passion flower plant, which grows several meters during a single summer, has made an entry into our garden by "climbing" over the fence. Great, because they are wonderful flowers. I made a note to myself that as soon as I have time, I will try a focus shifting stack on one of the flowers. As I was rather busy, each day I would just observe if the flower is still there, because a single flower was blossoming. <br />
<br />
Yes, it was still there each day for the whole 2 weeks. Except that it wasn't, because I've now learned that passion flowers bloom for a single day. In other words, I was looking at a different flower every single day. Quite a mindf***?<br />
<br />
Anyway, bear with me a little as I am inexperienced in focus stacking. I've made tons of mistakes and I'm still not happy with these results, but you have to start somewhere. This is an in-house scene (every outdoor shot failed horribly due to wind) with the flower on a clamp, and a flash light for top lighting. My camera is flat on the table and I'm using the Nikon D850's inbuilt focus shifting mode, where you simply enter the number of steps and the size of each step. The background was initially not this dark yet I had to apply some brushes due to halo effects as part of the stacking process. <br />
<br />
And oh yes, about passion flowers. As said, they bloom for a single day. Another remarkable fact is regarding the mimicry of some species. Butterflies using this flower as a host plant to deposit eggs, first check if another butterfly did not already deposited eggs, to avoid cannibalism. The passion flower has a brilliant defense: it contains a mimic of these butterfly eggs: small, orange round bulbs that looks like eggs, but are purely a misleading appendage. <br />
<br />
Some different crops:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62997/blue_passion_flower_macro_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63002/blue_passion_flower_macro_-_iii_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
<br />
Different experiments:<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63005/white_flower_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63007/flower_stack_heesch_netherlands.html Blue Passion Flower,Europe,Focus Shift,Focus Stack,Heesch,Netherlands,Passiflora caerulea,World

Blue Passion Flower macro - III, Heesch, Netherlands About 2 weeks ago, I noticed how our neighbour's passion flower plant, which grows several meters during a single summer, has made an entry into our garden by "climbing" over the fence. Great, because they are wonderful flowers. I made a note to myself that as soon as I have time, I will try a focus shifting stack on one of the flowers. As I was rather busy, each day I would just observe if the flower is still there, because a single flower was blossoming. <br />
<br />
Yes, it was still there each day for the whole 2 weeks. Except that it wasn't, because I've now learned that passion flowers bloom for a single day. In other words, I was looking at a different flower every single day. Quite a mindf***?<br />
<br />
Anyway, bear with me a little as I am inexperienced in focus stacking. I've made tons of mistakes and I'm still not happy with these results, but you have to start somewhere. This is an in-house scene (every outdoor shot failed horribly due to wind) with the flower on a clamp, and a flash light for top lighting. My camera is flat on the table and I'm using the Nikon D850's inbuilt focus shifting mode, where you simply enter the number of steps and the size of each step. The background was initially not this dark yet I had to apply some brushes due to halo effects as part of the stacking process. <br />
<br />
And oh yes, about passion flowers. As said, they bloom for a single day. Another remarkable fact is regarding the mimicry of some species. Butterflies using this flower as a host plant to deposit eggs, first check if another butterfly did not already deposited eggs, to avoid cannibalism. The passion flower has a brilliant defense: it contains a mimic of these butterfly eggs: small, orange round bulbs that looks like eggs, but are purely a misleading appendage. <br />
<br />
Some different crops:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62997/blue_passion_flower_macro_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63001/blue_passion_flower_macro_-_ii_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
<br />
Different experiments:<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63005/white_flower_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63007/flower_stack_heesch_netherlands.html Blue Passion Flower,Europe,Focus Shift,Focus Stack,Heesch,Netherlands,Passiflora caerulea,World


Different experiments:

White flower, Heesch, Netherlands Another example of a focus shift stack done on a tiny flower taken from our garden. Unfortunately, I have no idea what type of flower it is. In this case I used a high key process to get rid of halos, although you can still see some traces of it.<br />
<br />
Some more experiments done on this day:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62997/blue_passion_flower_macro_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63003/blue_passion_flower_-_core_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63007/flower_stack_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Focus Shift,Focus Stack,Heesch,Netherlands,World

Flower stack, Heesch, Netherlands Another example of a focus shift stack done on a tiny flower taken from our garden. Unfortunately, I have no idea what type of flower it is. I really love the lighting in this one, but as you can see it suffers from strong halo effects around the edges. In this case it was too difficult to clean up. Halo is a result of focus stacking software being inaccurate in trying to determine which part of a single shot in a stack is sharp. <br />
<br />
Some more experiments done on this day:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62997/blue_passion_flower_macro_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63003/blue_passion_flower_-_core_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/63005/white_flower_heesch_netherlands.html Europe,Focus Stack,Heesch,Netherlands,World

    comments (9)

  1. So hard to decide on a fave photo. They are all so perfect! Posted one year ago
    1. Happy with your response, Lisa, as I was a bit unsure about results. Posted one year ago
  2. Wow! Fantastic. Job, Ferdy! These shots are incredible. Much respect for focus stacking! I read about the process last week and it sounded daunting. Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks, Christine. It is kind of a paradox really, the theory is quite simple, but in practice it can be quite cumbersome. I'm sure that's my inexperience though where I make a lot of beginner mistakes. Posted one year ago
  3. Wow man, takes me back to the 60s and Jefferson Airplane! Posted one year ago
    1. You just shared your age, Barry ;) Posted one year ago
      1. No sense hiding it Posted one year ago
  4. Great shots, Ferdy. Welcome to the world of macro focus stacking! Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks, Gary! Posted one year ago

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Passiflora caerulea, commonly known as the Blue Passion Flower or the Common Passion Flower, is a vine native to South America (Argentina, Paraguay (where it is widely known as the Mburucuyá in Guaraní), Uruguay and Brazil). These names may also be applied to Passiflora edulis sometimes known as the passionfruit.

It is popular with gardeners because of its intricate, scented flowers that have an almost plastic-looking appearance.

Similar species: Malpighiales
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jul 15, 2018. Captured Jul 14, 2018 16:46.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/4.0
  • 1/200s
  • ISO64
  • 105mm