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Ghost Plant, Indian Pipe, (Monotropa uniflora) Finally, a chance to photograph a beautiful specimen of this very interesting plant. Last year&rsquo;s stalks are clearly visible behind this year&rsquo;s. Unfortunately my favourite site where there were numerous plants had been &ldquo;harvested&rdquo; with every above ground plant part cut at ground level. Perhaps this article, <a href="https://www.americanherbalistsguild.com/sites/default/files/donahue_sean_-_ghost_pipe-_a_little_known_nervine.pdf" rel="nofollow">https://www.americanherbalistsguild.com/sites/default/files/donahue_sean_-_ghost_pipe-_a_little_known_nervine.pdf</a> ,may be the explanation. My only hope is that they return next year. Canada,Geotagged,Ghost Plant,Monotropa uniflora,Summer Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Ghost Plant, Indian Pipe, (Monotropa uniflora)

Finally, a chance to photograph a beautiful specimen of this very interesting plant. Last year’s stalks are clearly visible behind this year’s. Unfortunately my favourite site where there were numerous plants had been “harvested” with every above ground plant part cut at ground level. Perhaps this article, https://www.americanherbalistsguild.com/sites/default/files/donahue_sean_-_ghost_pipe-_a_little_known_nervine.pdf ,may be the explanation. My only hope is that they return next year.

    comments (7)

  1. Interesting. There are a couple spots where I usually find large quantities of indian pipe, but they haven’t popped up in those locations. I didn’t think to check if they had been harvested. Weird coincidence for sure though. Posted one year ago
    1. I have to admit that I was more than a little saddened when I realized what had happened. There must have been more than one hundred stalks that were cut off at ground level. Posted one year ago
      1. Wow!! Posted one year ago
  2. From today's JungleDragon Facebook page:

    "Monotropa uniflora, commonly known as ghost plant, indian pipe, and corpse plant, is an anomaly among plants. These stunning ghosts are flowering, perennial plants that lack chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is a green pigment that is critical for photosynthesis, which is the process where plants produce their own food using sunlight. Since it's not dependent on sunlight , it can grow in dark forests where it spends most of its life underground—only coming above ground to flower and disperse. So, how does this plant obtain nutrients since it doesn't contain chlorophyll? Monotropa uniflora is a myco-heterotroph, which means that it gets its food by parasitizing fungi. Here's how the process works: It starts with a fungus...This fungus wraps its mycelia around the roots of a tree, thus giving the fungus access to the tree's nutrients. In return, the fungus increases the tree's root system, which allows the tree to take in more water and nutrients. Win-win for the fungus and the tree. Monotropa uniflora connects its roots with those of the fungus, thus allowing it to steal nutrients from the fungus AND the tree. It gives nothing back to the fungus or the tree, however, and simply takes what it needs to survive. It is a true oddity in the plant world. {Spotted in Canada by JungleDragon user, Gary Fast} #JungleDragon"
    Posted 11 months ago
  3. I thought you might be interested to know that this was JungleDragon's most popular post in the past month! It has reached almost 2,000 people! Posted 10 months ago
    1. Christine, thank you for letting me know. I am surprised and not being all that humble, I like the photo myself! Gary Posted 10 months ago
      1. It is definitely a great shot! Posted 10 months ago

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''Monotropa uniflora'', also known as the Ghost Plant, Indian Pipe, or Corpse Plant is a herbaceous perennial plant, formerly classified in the family Monotropaceae, but now included within the Ericaceae. It is native to temperate regions of Asia, North America and northern South America, but with large gaps between areas. It is generally scarce or rare in occurrence.

Unlike most plants, it is white and does not contain chlorophyll. Instead of generating energy from sunlight, it is parasitic,.. more

Similar species: Ericales
Species identified by gary fast
View gary fast's profile

By gary fast

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jul 14, 2018. Captured Jul 14, 2018 09:54 in Coulter Bay Rd, Squirrel Cove, BC V0P 1T0, Canada.
  • E-M5MarkII
  • f/8.0
  • 1/10s
  • ISO1000
  • 20mm