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Eastern Newt (Red Eft) - Notophthalmus viridescens I&#039;m so disappointed that this photo is blurry, but I&#039;m sharing it anyway because this is the REDDEST red eft that I&#039;ve ever seen! They are usually orange despite their moniker. The color in this photo is true to life! Too bad that I was being bombarded by biting flies while enduring the insane humidity when I was taking this photo because the newt stayed perfectly still during the shot and it could have been so sharp! Oh well :/<br />
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Red efts have bright orange (usually) aposematic coloring, with darker, reddish spots outlined in black. This stage can last up to 4 years on land, during which time efts may travel far, which ensures outcrossing in the population.<br />
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I spotted this one on the edge of a swamp in a mixed forest. It was tiny (just over 3 cm long). Eastern newt,Geotagged,Notophthalmus,Notophthalmus viridescens,Summer,United States,eastern newt,newt,red eft,salamander Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Eastern Newt (Red Eft) - Notophthalmus viridescens

I'm so disappointed that this photo is blurry, but I'm sharing it anyway because this is the REDDEST red eft that I've ever seen! They are usually orange despite their moniker. The color in this photo is true to life! Too bad that I was being bombarded by biting flies while enduring the insane humidity when I was taking this photo because the newt stayed perfectly still during the shot and it could have been so sharp! Oh well :/

Red efts have bright orange (usually) aposematic coloring, with darker, reddish spots outlined in black. This stage can last up to 4 years on land, during which time efts may travel far, which ensures outcrossing in the population.

I spotted this one on the edge of a swamp in a mixed forest. It was tiny (just over 3 cm long).

    comments (10)

  1. For what it's worth, hadn't noticed any blurriness both as a thumbnail and after opening it. What I did notice is the spectacular color, so glad you shared it! Posted 2 years ago
    1. Oh, thanks! I had hoped to get the entire salamander in focus, but no such luck with my macro and shallow DOF. Posted 2 years ago
      1. It looks like you have a 24MP sensor. You could create a bit more distance and thereby have more DOF, and then crop back in. If you'd take a strategy of making several shots from far until closest, you'd take that distant shot anyway.

        I use this strategy a lot to create 'fake' macros. They are taken with a macro lens yet not at 1:1 closest focus distance. They are taken further away to avoid the subject fleeing. Then crop back in and still get a good magnification. This obviously only works if the more distant shot is not moved, because any error is magnified during cropping. Which is why I simply take lots :)

        To be clear, this photos is fine, awesome even. But maybe it's a strategy that can help, or maybe you're already doing it.
        Posted 2 years ago
        1. Yep, 24MP. I haven't tried creating more distance, but that totally makes sense. Funny (and lazy), but I sometimes use my 70-300mm for macro shots - mostly because I don't feel like changing the lens, but also because the entire subject is more likely in focus. I love macro, but have just invested in a 16-35mm lens as well, which will hopefully add some interesting perspectives. I'm gradually learning more about digital photography and wish I had the time to learn more quickly, but, I'm enjoying the process. Any tips or photo critiques/comments are very welcome and much appreciated :) Posted 2 years ago
          1. You bring up a good point I've been thinking about lately. Although my recent FB posts may suggest otherwise, I too find that both the "more distance" approach as well as the occasional tele shot of insects are a way to achieve what I want: capturing insects in detail.

            And with detail I mean enough detail for the purpose (which largely is sharing it here), it doesn't always need to be macro-level detail (true 1:1 magnification as a minimum). So macro is not the goal, proper details is the goal, and I now see it as a scale. It would perhaps be more appropriate to say insect photographer (or plants, fungi), rather than macro, but perhaps that is confusing too.

            Luckily, these things are not at odds with each other, as I simply work outside-in: I get the total shot and simply move as close as the subject tolerates :)
            Posted 2 years ago
            1. Yes, exactly! I appreciate and think the selective focus shots are gorgeous, but sometimes I want the details totally clear- that is a super challenging struggle when you are shooting inches away from your subject with a macro lens. I agree with your technique - I get a shot of the entire subject before moving in to capture closer shots. Posted 2 years ago
  2. Ditto on Ferdy's comments. Spectacular coloring and great share!! Posted 2 years ago
    1. Thank you! Posted 2 years ago
  3. Oh wow! It is a very pretty colored one! In Belgium we have newts and salamanders but after all these years I could only see a few and always inside a pond :-) Posted 2 years ago
    1. Thanks Marta :)

      There are a couple species that I usually find, but this is the one I most frequently see. I've just never seen one this red (and tiny!) before! It was so beautiful.
      Posted 2 years ago

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The eastern newt or red-spotted newt is a common salamander of eastern North America. Eastern newts dwell in wet forests with small lakes or ponds. They can coexist in an aquatic environment with small, non-carnivorous fish, however, their skin secretes a poisonous substance when the newt is threatened or injured. They have a lifespan of 12 to 15 years in the wild, and may grow to 5 inches in length.

Similar species: Salamanders
Species identified by Christine Young
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By Christine Young

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Uploaded Jul 6, 2018. Captured Jul 6, 2018 12:48 in 281 Main St S, Woodbury, CT 06798, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/5.0
  • 1/64s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm