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Panorpa germanica heavily marked with notes Female Panorpa germanica with &quot;heavier&quot; than average wing pattern expression.<br />
1) Quite typical for this species is that the three triangular spots across from the pterostigma are roughly the same size. In comparably patterned vulgaris/communis the basal one will be large and the middle one smaller.<br />
2) Normally across from the third spot there is _no_ spot close to the pterostigma (empty circle), where in the other species this area will be spotted.<br />
3) The spots marked with !! are normally separated in P. germanica and remain so very long while the pattern grows heavier during wing colour development. In this specimen the spots are fused in the left fore wing (marked ?) so this does happen, but a heavily marked specimen with non-fused &quot;twin spot&quot; will likely be germanica.<br />
<br />
Always look at _all_ the characters mentioned here to assess the wing as a whole!! Aberrations in one of the characters are frequent, but all three is very very unlikely :o) <br />
<br />
Here is a male with an &quot;average&quot;, more open wing pattern for comparison, where you can clearly also recognize the patterns indicated:<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62319/panorpa_germanica_male_typical.html" title="Panorpa germanica male typical"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3043/62319_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1578528010&Signature=6Qeaf33ZMWrSgk2Y1IArgvrpqVk%3D" width="200" height="150" alt="Panorpa germanica male typical Male Panorpa germanica with middle of the road typical wing pattern for this species. Genital bulb with short and broad hypovalves.<br />
<br />
Refer to this image for an explanation of what to look for in the pattern:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62317/panorpa_germanica_heavily_marked_with_notes.html<br />
<br />
On male Panorpa germanica also look for the &quot;huge&quot; notal organ indicated in the image below. It is visible in the image above too, but more hidden in the shadow of the wings ;o)<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62318/panorpa_germanica_notal_organ.html German Scorpionfly,Mecoptera,Panorpa,Panorpa ID help,Panorpa germanica,Panorpidae,Scorpionfly" /></a></figure><br />
Do always keep in mind that for males it is more secure to check clear morphological traits such as shown here:<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62318/panorpa_germanica_notal_organ.html" title="Panorpa germanica notal organ"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3043/62318_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1578528010&Signature=rk3Ivgsq5%2FLbB2aR6gJeEHxPdwI%3D" width="200" height="150" alt="Panorpa germanica notal organ Collage of male Panorpa germanica with the large notal organ typical for males of this species indicated.<br />
The inset above shows the short and broad hypovalves on the calliper, that are typical for P.germanica (and the extremely rare P.hybrida).<br />
<br />
The notal organ is a &quot;clamp&quot; located dorsally on the hind margin of the 3rd abdominal tergite that is used to firmly hold the wing of the female during copula, preventing her from pulling loose without risk of damaging her wing. All species have this, but on P.germanica and P.hybrida it is exceptionally large. German Scorpionfly,Mecoptera,Panorpa,Panorpa ID help,Panorpa germanica,Panorpidae,Scorpionfly" /></a></figure> German Scorpionfly,Mecoptera,Panorpa,Panorpa ID help,Panorpa germanica,Panorpidae,Scorpionfly Click/tap to enlarge

Panorpa germanica heavily marked with notes

Female Panorpa germanica with "heavier" than average wing pattern expression.
1) Quite typical for this species is that the three triangular spots across from the pterostigma are roughly the same size. In comparably patterned vulgaris/communis the basal one will be large and the middle one smaller.
2) Normally across from the third spot there is _no_ spot close to the pterostigma (empty circle), where in the other species this area will be spotted.
3) The spots marked with !! are normally separated in P. germanica and remain so very long while the pattern grows heavier during wing colour development. In this specimen the spots are fused in the left fore wing (marked ?) so this does happen, but a heavily marked specimen with non-fused "twin spot" will likely be germanica.

Always look at _all_ the characters mentioned here to assess the wing as a whole!! Aberrations in one of the characters are frequent, but all three is very very unlikely :o)

Here is a male with an "average", more open wing pattern for comparison, where you can clearly also recognize the patterns indicated:

Panorpa germanica male typical Male Panorpa germanica with middle of the road typical wing pattern for this species. Genital bulb with short and broad hypovalves.<br />
<br />
Refer to this image for an explanation of what to look for in the pattern:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62317/panorpa_germanica_heavily_marked_with_notes.html<br />
<br />
On male Panorpa germanica also look for the "huge" notal organ indicated in the image below. It is visible in the image above too, but more hidden in the shadow of the wings ;o)<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62318/panorpa_germanica_notal_organ.html German Scorpionfly,Mecoptera,Panorpa,Panorpa ID help,Panorpa germanica,Panorpidae,Scorpionfly

Do always keep in mind that for males it is more secure to check clear morphological traits such as shown here:
Panorpa germanica notal organ Collage of male Panorpa germanica with the large notal organ typical for males of this species indicated.<br />
The inset above shows the short and broad hypovalves on the calliper, that are typical for P.germanica (and the extremely rare P.hybrida).<br />
<br />
The notal organ is a "clamp" located dorsally on the hind margin of the 3rd abdominal tergite that is used to firmly hold the wing of the female during copula, preventing her from pulling loose without risk of damaging her wing. All species have this, but on P.germanica and P.hybrida it is exceptionally large. German Scorpionfly,Mecoptera,Panorpa,Panorpa ID help,Panorpa germanica,Panorpidae,Scorpionfly

    comments (2)

  1. Interesting, and so helpful to have the details marked. Posted one year ago
    1. Glad you like it :o) Should probable make more of those for the other species too ... (time, time ... ;o) Posted one year ago

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Panorpa germanica (German Scorpionfly) is one of the most common species of Skorpionfly in large parts of Europe.

Similar species: Scorpionflies And Allies
Species identified by Pudding4brains
View Pudding4brains's profile

By Pudding4brains

Public Domain
Uploaded Jul 1, 2018.