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German scorpionfly, Heeswijk, Netherlands Quite common in my area but I&#039;ll never get bored of seeing them, as they are so unusual looking little freaks. They are named after the male appendage that looks similar to a scorpion&#039;s stinger. On this fly, however, it&#039;s not a stinger, instead they are genitalia with claspers to hold onto the female during mating. Here&#039;s a closeup of this appendage:<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62315/german_scorpionfly_-_male_genitalia_heeswijk_netherlands.html" title="German scorpionfly - Male Genitalia, Heeswijk, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/62315_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1658361610&Signature=V5vjE1FYQt44iHne0PcfdMAC7N0%3D" width="200" height="200" alt="German scorpionfly - Male Genitalia, Heeswijk, Netherlands Quite common in my area but I&#039;ll never get bored of seeing them, as they are so unusual looking little freaks. They are named after the male appendage that looks similar to a scorpion&#039;s stinger. On this fly, however, it&#039;s not a stinger, instead they are genitalia with claspers to hold onto the female during mating. <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62314/common_scorpionfly_heeswijk_netherlands.html<br />
Be sure to also check out its freaky mouth:<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/37287/panorpa_communis.html Europe,German Scorpionfly,Heeswijk-Dinther,Netherlands,Panorpa germanica,World" /></a></figure><br />
Be sure to also check out its freaky mouth:<br />
<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/37287/panorpa_communis.html" title="Panorpa communis"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2771/37287_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1658361610&Signature=xcifvg%2F%2Fe%2FctFj1V8i05Sq%2FmNGU%3D" width="102" height="152" alt="Panorpa communis This is a stack of a male scorpionfly (about 30 pictures). This of corse was a dead specimen caught in a horsefly trap. Normally i don&#039;t do a lot of big stack photography on dead critters, but this was something (i think) really worth doing a big stack on.  Common scorpionfly,Geotagged,Netherlands,Panorpa communis,Scorpion Fly,Summer" /></a></figure> Europe,German Scorpionfly,Heeswijk-Dinther,Netherlands,Panorpa germanica,World Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

German scorpionfly, Heeswijk, Netherlands

Quite common in my area but I'll never get bored of seeing them, as they are so unusual looking little freaks. They are named after the male appendage that looks similar to a scorpion's stinger. On this fly, however, it's not a stinger, instead they are genitalia with claspers to hold onto the female during mating. Here's a closeup of this appendage:

German scorpionfly - Male Genitalia, Heeswijk, Netherlands Quite common in my area but I'll never get bored of seeing them, as they are so unusual looking little freaks. They are named after the male appendage that looks similar to a scorpion's stinger. On this fly, however, it's not a stinger, instead they are genitalia with claspers to hold onto the female during mating. <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62314/common_scorpionfly_heeswijk_netherlands.html<br />
Be sure to also check out its freaky mouth:<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/37287/panorpa_communis.html Europe,German Scorpionfly,Heeswijk-Dinther,Netherlands,Panorpa germanica,World

Be sure to also check out its freaky mouth:

Panorpa communis This is a stack of a male scorpionfly (about 30 pictures). This of corse was a dead specimen caught in a horsefly trap. Normally i don't do a lot of big stack photography on dead critters, but this was something (i think) really worth doing a big stack on.  Common scorpionfly,Geotagged,Netherlands,Panorpa communis,Scorpion Fly,Summer

    comments (12)

  1. Fantastic! Love these bugs. They look like they are wearing gas masks. Posted 3 years ago, modified 3 years ago
    1. Exactly, WW1 look! Posted 3 years ago
      1. Yes!

        Posted 3 years ago, modified 3 years ago
  2. Great shot and super cool fly!! Posted 3 years ago
    1. Thanks, Stephen! Posted 3 years ago
  3. Gorgeous! I've actually never seen one in person (besides a pinned specimen)! Posted 3 years ago
    1. Thanks! Wikipedia mentions they occur not in the west of the US, implying maybe they do occur in the east. Fingers crossed :) Posted 3 years ago
      1. I'm pretty sure they are here. I just haven't paid enough attention! :D Posted 3 years ago
        1. Seems there are 21+ different species of Panorpa in North America. I see a couple of data points towards the west coast, but not many!
          https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=97394&taxon_id=51700
          Posted 3 years ago
          1. Hah, all in the east. You know what to do :)
            Love your curious mind, you just had to fill that gap.
            Posted 3 years ago
  4. Blimey Ferdy, a spectacular photo! Posted 3 years ago
    1. Thank you, Claire :) Posted 3 years ago

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Panorpa germanica (German Scorpionfly) is one of the most common species of Skorpionfly in large parts of Europe.

Similar species: Scorpionflies And Allies
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jul 1, 2018. Captured May 27, 2018 14:00.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/11.0
  • 1/60s
  • ISO64
  • 105mm