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Drosera burmannii - Burmese Sundew / Tropical Sundew / Drosera Tropical (Vahl) Plantae: Magnoliopsida: Caryophyllales: Polygonineae: Droseraceae<br />
<br />
Date: 8th of March, 2018 at 09:47:06pm.<br />
Location: Brazil, Cear&aacute;, Fortaleza.<br />
Diameter: ~2cm.<br />
<br />
Full post here: <figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62563/drosera_burmannii_-_burmese_sundew_tropical_sundew_drosera_tropical_vahl.html" title="Drosera burmannii - Burmese Sundew / Tropical Sundew / Drosera Tropical (Vahl)"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3305/62563_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1573084810&Signature=lScEhHcYbcjxOZY1BX%2Fpygs07zo%3D" width="200" height="188" alt="Drosera burmannii - Burmese Sundew / Tropical Sundew / Drosera Tropical (Vahl) Plantae: Magnoliopsida: Caryophyllales: Polygonineae: Droseraceae<br />
<br />
Another picture here (Date: 8th of March, 2018 at 09:47:06pm):<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61716/drosera_burmannii_-_burmese_sundew_tropical_sundew_drosera_tropical_vahl.html<br />
<br />
Date: 30th of June, 2018 at 12:00:12pm<br />
Location: Brazil, Cear&aacute;, Fortaleza.<br />
Diameter: ~2cm.<br />
Lifespan: ~1 Year<br />
<br />
The Drosera burmannii is a carnivore plant in the class Magnoliopsida, order Caryophyllales, suborder Polygonineae and family Droseraceae.<br />
<br />
Pollinators are guided to the flowers by visual cues and protected from the traps by spatial separation.<br />
<br />
The tentacles are glandular and possess thin strings. The tip of these strings contain a sticky fluid covering the laminae. To digest prey two glands are used: one secretes a sweet mucilage that is used to attract, capture prey and produce enzymes to digest them. The other absorbs the bodily fluids of the prey. Small insects have no strength to escape the the sticky substance, eventually dying by exhaustion or asphyxiation as the fluid envelops them. The death usually occurs within 15 minutes. Meanwhile, the plant will secrete esterase, peroxidase, phosphatase and protease enzymes which will dissolve the insect and release the nutrients from within. The nutrients proceed to be absorbed through the surface of the leaves to nourish the plant.<br />
<br />
Drosera will move their tentacles in response to contact with edible prey, especially Drosera burmannii. The tentacles will normally bend towards the center of the leaf to bring the insect into contact with many stalked glands, but this is not a rule to all species.<br />
<br />
The flowering of Drosera occurs high above the dangerous parts; this mechanism is an evolved adaptation that allows the plant to be pollinated by insects without killing them being, then, able to reproduce, even though they can self-pollinate. The flowers are very sensitive to light and will blossom, most of the time, when direct sunlight becomes stronger. The flowers are helitropic, which means they will move to correspond the Sun&#039;s position. The seeds are incredibly tiny, hard to see to the naked eye. Most species of Drosera self-fertilize, meaning that the flower will usually self-pollinate upon closing. Many, many seeds are produced, which germinate through exposure to moisture and light. Some seeds require cold and damp stratification to germinate. There are different requirements among different species.<br />
<br />
Their roots are weak and serve as anchors and water absorbers to the plant, being almost useless for nutrient intake. A few species use the roots for water and food storage, while others possess wiry root systems that will remain alive during frost if the stem dies. Some species use the roots for asexual reproduction.<br />
<br />
When cultivated, they should be planted in Sphagnum sp. moss (Sphagnidae: Sphagnales: Sphagnaceae) (L.), live or dehydrated, or a mixture of sand and the mentioned moss. I have always used moss alone and never had any problems. Other options exist. The moss in the picture is live Sphagnum sp.. Sundews do not rely too much on soil substances to thrive. They are moderately frost-resistant.<br />
<br />
The seeds of Drosera burmannii are very easy to germinate. The Drosera burmannii measures around 2cm or more in diameter. They tend to die after the flowering process if they do not feed, but can virtually grow forever under lights in colder areas as the seeds will eventually fall and give room for more of them. The flowers of Drosera burmannii self-pollinate and the seeds will fall on their own on the substract (preferrably Sphagnum sp. moss) to produce more plants. The soil has to be constantly wet, especially under heat.<br />
<br />
Drosera should never be manually fed, doing so may damage the plant if done incorrectly. Drosera can catch prey on their own through their own adaptations, and they can live well enough with water and sunlight alone.<br />
<br />
The water &gt;NEEDS&lt; to be chlorine-free. Chlorine is known to kill members of Droseraceae. Rain water is perfect, but the filtered water without chlorine that you drink is great as well.<br />
<br />
The natural habitats of Drosera are seasonally moist or constantly wet habitats with acidic soils and high levels of sunlight. These habitats include bogs, fens, swamps, marshes, the tepuis of Venezuela, the wallums of coastal Australia, the fynbos of South Africa and moist streambanks. Specifically referring to Drosera burmannii, they can be found in Australia and Southeast Asia, in rocky places, where it&#039;s generally dry with plenty of sunlight but have been introduced elsewhere. Further habitats include rainforests, deserts and even highly shaded environments.<br />
<br />
Text revision by Marina de Azevedo Guerra.<br />
<br />
Sources:<br />
<br />
https://www.carnivoras.com.br/drosera-burmannii-t294.html<br />
<br />
https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drosera_burmannii<br />
<br />
https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drosera<br />
<br />
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drosera_burmannii Brazil,Burmese Sundew,Carnivorous plant,Caryophyllales,Drosera burmannii,Droseraceae,Flora,Geotagged,Neotropical,Plantae,Plants,Polygonineae,South America,Sundew,Tropical Sundew,Tropical sundew,carnivore plant,magnoliopsida,nature,plant" /></a></figure> Brazil,Burmese Sundew,Carnivorous Plants,Caryophyllales,Drosera,Drosera burmannii,Droseraceae,Eudicots,Flora,Geotagged,Plantae,Plants,Polygonineae,South America,Sundew,brasil,ceara,fortaleza,magnoliopsida,marsh plants Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Drosera burmannii - Burmese Sundew / Tropical Sundew / Drosera Tropical (Vahl)

Plantae: Magnoliopsida: Caryophyllales: Polygonineae: Droseraceae

Date: 8th of March, 2018 at 09:47:06pm.
Location: Brazil, Ceará, Fortaleza.
Diameter: ~2cm.

Full post here:

Drosera burmannii - Burmese Sundew / Tropical Sundew / Drosera Tropical (Vahl) Plantae: Magnoliopsida: Caryophyllales: Polygonineae: Droseraceae<br />
<br />
Another picture here (Date: 8th of March, 2018 at 09:47:06pm):<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61716/drosera_burmannii_-_burmese_sundew_tropical_sundew_drosera_tropical_vahl.html<br />
<br />
Date: 30th of June, 2018 at 12:00:12pm<br />
Location: Brazil, Ceará, Fortaleza.<br />
Diameter: ~2cm.<br />
Lifespan: ~1 Year<br />
<br />
The Drosera burmannii is a carnivore plant in the class Magnoliopsida, order Caryophyllales, suborder Polygonineae and family Droseraceae.<br />
<br />
Pollinators are guided to the flowers by visual cues and protected from the traps by spatial separation.<br />
<br />
The tentacles are glandular and possess thin strings. The tip of these strings contain a sticky fluid covering the laminae. To digest prey two glands are used: one secretes a sweet mucilage that is used to attract, capture prey and produce enzymes to digest them. The other absorbs the bodily fluids of the prey. Small insects have no strength to escape the the sticky substance, eventually dying by exhaustion or asphyxiation as the fluid envelops them. The death usually occurs within 15 minutes. Meanwhile, the plant will secrete esterase, peroxidase, phosphatase and protease enzymes which will dissolve the insect and release the nutrients from within. The nutrients proceed to be absorbed through the surface of the leaves to nourish the plant.<br />
<br />
Drosera will move their tentacles in response to contact with edible prey, especially Drosera burmannii. The tentacles will normally bend towards the center of the leaf to bring the insect into contact with many stalked glands, but this is not a rule to all species.<br />
<br />
The flowering of Drosera occurs high above the dangerous parts; this mechanism is an evolved adaptation that allows the plant to be pollinated by insects without killing them being, then, able to reproduce, even though they can self-pollinate. The flowers are very sensitive to light and will blossom, most of the time, when direct sunlight becomes stronger. The flowers are helitropic, which means they will move to correspond the Sun's position. The seeds are incredibly tiny, hard to see to the naked eye. Most species of Drosera self-fertilize, meaning that the flower will usually self-pollinate upon closing. Many, many seeds are produced, which germinate through exposure to moisture and light. Some seeds require cold and damp stratification to germinate. There are different requirements among different species.<br />
<br />
Their roots are weak and serve as anchors and water absorbers to the plant, being almost useless for nutrient intake. A few species use the roots for water and food storage, while others possess wiry root systems that will remain alive during frost if the stem dies. Some species use the roots for asexual reproduction.<br />
<br />
When cultivated, they should be planted in Sphagnum sp. moss (Sphagnidae: Sphagnales: Sphagnaceae) (L.), live or dehydrated, or a mixture of sand and the mentioned moss. I have always used moss alone and never had any problems. Other options exist. The moss in the picture is live Sphagnum sp.. Sundews do not rely too much on soil substances to thrive. They are moderately frost-resistant.<br />
<br />
The seeds of Drosera burmannii are very easy to germinate. The Drosera burmannii measures around 2cm or more in diameter. They tend to die after the flowering process if they do not feed, but can virtually grow forever under lights in colder areas as the seeds will eventually fall and give room for more of them. The flowers of Drosera burmannii self-pollinate and the seeds will fall on their own on the substract (preferrably Sphagnum sp. moss) to produce more plants. The soil has to be constantly wet, especially under heat.<br />
<br />
Drosera should never be manually fed, doing so may damage the plant if done incorrectly. Drosera can catch prey on their own through their own adaptations, and they can live well enough with water and sunlight alone.<br />
<br />
The water >NEEDS< to be chlorine-free. Chlorine is known to kill members of Droseraceae. Rain water is perfect, but the filtered water without chlorine that you drink is great as well.<br />
<br />
The natural habitats of Drosera are seasonally moist or constantly wet habitats with acidic soils and high levels of sunlight. These habitats include bogs, fens, swamps, marshes, the tepuis of Venezuela, the wallums of coastal Australia, the fynbos of South Africa and moist streambanks. Specifically referring to Drosera burmannii, they can be found in Australia and Southeast Asia, in rocky places, where it's generally dry with plenty of sunlight but have been introduced elsewhere. Further habitats include rainforests, deserts and even highly shaded environments.<br />
<br />
Text revision by Marina de Azevedo Guerra.<br />
<br />
Sources:<br />
<br />
https://www.carnivoras.com.br/drosera-burmannii-t294.html<br />
<br />
https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drosera_burmannii<br />
<br />
https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drosera<br />
<br />
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drosera_burmannii Brazil,Burmese Sundew,Carnivorous plant,Caryophyllales,Drosera burmannii,Droseraceae,Flora,Geotagged,Neotropical,Plantae,Plants,Polygonineae,South America,Sundew,Tropical Sundew,Tropical sundew,carnivore plant,magnoliopsida,nature,plant

    comments (5)

  1. Beautiful! Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks! Posted one year ago
  2. Excellent find, Oscar! We have very few carnivorous plants described, so this is most welcome! Posted one year ago
    1. Ooooh you'll be impressed soon ;) Posted one year ago
      1. Can't wait! Posted one year ago

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''Drosera burmannii'', the tropical sundew, is a small, compact species in the carnivorous plant genus ''Drosera''. Its natural geographical range includes Australia, India, China, Japan, and southeast Asia. It normally spans only 2 cm in diameter. It is one of the fastest trapping sundews as well, and its leaves can curl around an insect in only a few seconds, compared to the minutes or hours it takes other sundews to surround their prey. In nature, ''D. burmannii'' is an annual, but in cultivation,.. more

Similar species: Caryophyllales
Species identified by Oscar Neto
View Oscar Neto's profile

By Oscar Neto

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 17, 2018. Captured in Rua Tomás Acioli, 1185 - Joaquim Távora, Fortaleza - CE, 60135-180, Brazil.