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Laughing Kookaburra, Zie-Zoo, Netherlands Accidentally caught it with its 3rd eyelid fully closed, which I&#039;ll go into as part of the next photo:<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61566/nictitating_membrane_3rd_eyelid_on_laughing_kookaburra_zie-zoo_netherlands.html" title="Nictitating membrane (3rd eyelid) on Laughing kookaburra, Zie-Zoo, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/61566_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1667433610&Signature=8iOb7DA%2FH5ZSpyHEkHmme9bL6Rs%3D" width="200" height="150" alt="Nictitating membrane (3rd eyelid) on Laughing kookaburra, Zie-Zoo, Netherlands Here&#039;s a crop of a 3rd eyelid, called a Nictitating membrane. I think most people have seen it one way or another on birds or reptiles, as it comes across as a bit creepy. This third eyelid opens and closes horizontally. Different from normal vertical eyelids is that they still offer *some* vision whilst being closed. <br />
<br />
The purpose is to moisturize the eye, but also to protect it. Some birds close it so that their offspring don&#039;t pick out their eyes. Vultures may close it when going heads-first into a carcass, raptors may close them during an attack, and crocs may close them to protect against water.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61565/laughing_kookaburra_zie-zoo_netherlands.html Dacelo novaeguineae,Europe,Laughing Kookaburra,Netherlands,Volkel,World,Zie-Zoo,Zoo" /></a></figure><br />
This bird is known to be a great alarm clock:<br />
<br />
<section class="video"><iframe width="448" height="282" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/TqdRQxgtZtI?hd=1&autoplay=0&rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></section> Dacelo novaeguineae,Europe,Laughing Kookaburra,Netherlands,Volkel,World,Zie-Zoo,Zoo Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Laughing Kookaburra, Zie-Zoo, Netherlands

Accidentally caught it with its 3rd eyelid fully closed, which I'll go into as part of the next photo:

Nictitating membrane (3rd eyelid) on Laughing kookaburra, Zie-Zoo, Netherlands Here's a crop of a 3rd eyelid, called a Nictitating membrane. I think most people have seen it one way or another on birds or reptiles, as it comes across as a bit creepy. This third eyelid opens and closes horizontally. Different from normal vertical eyelids is that they still offer *some* vision whilst being closed. <br />
<br />
The purpose is to moisturize the eye, but also to protect it. Some birds close it so that their offspring don't pick out their eyes. Vultures may close it when going heads-first into a carcass, raptors may close them during an attack, and crocs may close them to protect against water.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61565/laughing_kookaburra_zie-zoo_netherlands.html Dacelo novaeguineae,Europe,Laughing Kookaburra,Netherlands,Volkel,World,Zie-Zoo,Zoo

This bird is known to be a great alarm clock:

    comments (8)

  1. Magnificently creepy and cool. Posted 4 years ago
    1. I wonder if its learned behavior to find it creepy. It's just an eyelid. But I do find it creepy too. Maybe a Hollywood effect, a typical alien in human form would blink this way :) Posted 4 years ago
      1. So true. It’s only creepy because of perception. It reminds me of a zombie ;) Posted 4 years ago
  2. Ha ha.. Where's the snooze button!
    We get these every day... plus that ringer Currawong which I find even creepier close up.
    Posted 4 years ago
    1. Had to look that one up, pretty bird and surprisingly large.

      Posted 4 years ago
  3. From today's Facebook post:

    Notice anything unusual? The Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) has an extra eyelid, called a nictitating membrane! If you’re a bird, keen eyesight is critical for survival. Many birds lead lives that are hard on their eyes—they dive underwater to capture prey, fly at high speed with wind rushing in their face, and drill into trees in search of insects. Nictitating membranes provide protection from dust and debris, they clean and lubricate, and they prevent retinal damage. They are “nature’s goggles”, and are the perfect example of a fantastic adaptation that protects birds from the perils that accompany their lifestyle. {Spotted by JungleDragon founder, Ferdy Christant} #JungleDragon
    Posted 3 years ago
    1. Nice post with brilliant writing as always! Posted 3 years ago
      1. Thanks! I've been wanting to feature this one for awhile now, it's too cool and weird! Posted 3 years ago

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The Laughing Kookaburra is a carnivorous bird in the kingfisher family Halcyonidae. Native to eastern Australia, it has also been introduced to parts of New Zealand, Tasmania and Western Australia. Male and female adults are similar in plumage, which is predominantly brown and white. A common and familiar bird, this species of kookaburra is well known for its laughing call.

Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 13, 2018. Captured May 6, 2018 13:49.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/5.6
  • 1/400s
  • ISO64
  • 210mm