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Evergreen Bagworm Moth - Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis Bagworms are not really worms, but are caterpillars - they are the immature stage of a moth. They&#039;re called &quot;bagworms&quot; because they construct bags/cases that are covered with pieces of twigs and/or leaves. <br />
<br />
In this species, the larvae emerge from the carcass of their mother in her pupal case. These newborn larva emerge from the bottom of the hanging case and drop down on a strand of silk. The wind will then blow them to a nearby plant where they can build their own cases made of silk, fecal material, and plant bits. Adult males transform into moths in about four weeks and immediately seek out females for mating. The females never leave the cocoon, but wait for a male to stick its abdomen through the opening at the end of her case so they can mate. Females do not have eyes, legs, wings, or antennae...and, they can&#039;t eat.  After her death, her offspring hatch and then pass through her body and leave the case.  <br />
<br />
This case was pretty big - around 5 cm long. I cut it open, and found remnants of a female carcass, other debris, and frass. I&#039;m not sure what kind of tree it was on, but it was some kind of arborvitae. If you look closely, you can see the hole in the top right of the case.<br />
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<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61550/evergreen_bagworm_moth_-_thyridopteryx_ephemeraeformis.html" title="Evergreen Bagworm Moth - Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/61550_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1545868810&Signature=DPCEy2cUGcAh7TBwwW1rWCO83uY%3D" width="200" height="158" alt="Evergreen Bagworm Moth - Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis Bagworms are not really worms, but are caterpillars - they are the immature stage of a moth. They&#039;re called &quot;bagworms&quot; because they construct bags/cases that are covered with pieces of twigs and/or leaves. <br />
<br />
In this species, the larvae emerge from the carcass of their mother in her pupal case. These newborn larva emerge from the bottom of the hanging case and drop down on a strand of silk. The wind will then blow them to a nearby plant where they can build their own cases made of silk, fecal material, and plant bits. Adult males transform into moths in about four weeks and immediately seek out females for mating. The females never leave the cocoon, but wait for a male to stick its abdomen through the opening at the end of her case so they can mate. Females do not have eyes, legs, wings, or antennae...and, they can&#039;t eat.  After her death, her offspring hatch and then pass through her body and leave the case.  <br />
<br />
This case was pretty big - around 5 cm long. I cut it open, and found remnants of a female carcass, other debris, and frass. I&#039;m not sure what kind of tree it was on, but it was some kind of arborvitae. This photo shows the hole that was in the top of the case - I&#039;m assuming it&#039;s the hole the male used to mate with the female.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61549/evergreen_bagworm_moth_-_thyridopteryx_ephemeraeformis.html Evergreen Bagworm,Evergreen Bagworm Moth,Geotagged,Spring,Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis,United States" /></a></figure> Evergreen Bagworm,Geotagged,North American bagworm,Spring,Thyridopteryx,Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis,United States,bagworm,bagworm moth,common bagworm,common basket worm,eastern bagworm,moth week 2018 Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Evergreen Bagworm Moth - Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis

Bagworms are not really worms, but are caterpillars - they are the immature stage of a moth. They're called "bagworms" because they construct bags/cases that are covered with pieces of twigs and/or leaves.

In this species, the larvae emerge from the carcass of their mother in her pupal case. These newborn larva emerge from the bottom of the hanging case and drop down on a strand of silk. The wind will then blow them to a nearby plant where they can build their own cases made of silk, fecal material, and plant bits. Adult males transform into moths in about four weeks and immediately seek out females for mating. The females never leave the cocoon, but wait for a male to stick its abdomen through the opening at the end of her case so they can mate. Females do not have eyes, legs, wings, or antennae...and, they can't eat. After her death, her offspring hatch and then pass through her body and leave the case.

This case was pretty big - around 5 cm long. I cut it open, and found remnants of a female carcass, other debris, and frass. I'm not sure what kind of tree it was on, but it was some kind of arborvitae. If you look closely, you can see the hole in the top right of the case.

Evergreen Bagworm Moth - Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis Bagworms are not really worms, but are caterpillars - they are the immature stage of a moth. They're called "bagworms" because they construct bags/cases that are covered with pieces of twigs and/or leaves. <br />
<br />
In this species, the larvae emerge from the carcass of their mother in her pupal case. These newborn larva emerge from the bottom of the hanging case and drop down on a strand of silk. The wind will then blow them to a nearby plant where they can build their own cases made of silk, fecal material, and plant bits. Adult males transform into moths in about four weeks and immediately seek out females for mating. The females never leave the cocoon, but wait for a male to stick its abdomen through the opening at the end of her case so they can mate. Females do not have eyes, legs, wings, or antennae...and, they can't eat.  After her death, her offspring hatch and then pass through her body and leave the case.  <br />
<br />
This case was pretty big - around 5 cm long. I cut it open, and found remnants of a female carcass, other debris, and frass. I'm not sure what kind of tree it was on, but it was some kind of arborvitae. This photo shows the hole that was in the top of the case - I'm assuming it's the hole the male used to mate with the female.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61549/evergreen_bagworm_moth_-_thyridopteryx_ephemeraeformis.html Evergreen Bagworm,Evergreen Bagworm Moth,Geotagged,Spring,Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis,United States

    comments (4)

  1. Oh wow, Christine. This has to be the biggest and most spectacular insect structure I've seen yet (apart from possible ants). What a find! Posted 5 months ago
    1. Thanks! It was awesome. I found it on some kind of arborvitae next to a building in a suburban area. So odd. Glad I had my camera. The cocoon was so amazing strong that I had to use a knife to cut it open! Posted 5 months ago
  2. hi Christine,

    Came across this video and immediately had to think of your "animal architecture" list :)

    Posted 5 months ago
    1. If I didn't already know for a fact that nature is absolutely incredible, this would confirm it. Mind-blowingly cool! Posted 5 months ago

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The evergreen bagworm , commonly known as bagworm,
eastern bagworm, common bagworm, common basket worm, or North American bagworm, is a moth that spins its cocoon in its larval life, decorating it with bits of plant material from the trees on which it feeds.

The evergreen bagworm's case grows to a length of over 6 cm, tapered and open on both ends. Newborn larva are blackish and turn brown to tan as they grow, mottled with black. The heads and thorax develop a yellow tint as they.. more

Similar species: Moths And Butterflies
Species identified by Christine Young
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By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 13, 2018. Captured Jun 12, 2018 09:38 in 5 East St, New Milford, CT 06776, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/5.6
  • 1/83s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm