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Gasteruption jaculator - full body view, Netherlands Presumed species. A few days ago, I granted myself a 15 minute sunbath in the garden. But of course, even in such a rare moment of relaxation, the natural world called for my attention. The red on this insect caught my eye.<br />
<br />
It&#039;s sitting on our shed in which we store garden tools. The shed is poorly maintained and the wood has several holes in it which are thankfully used by several bee species and hover flies as a nest. Good, because I&#039;m employing several tactics in our garden to promote insect populations. <br />
<br />
Before grabbing the camera I first watched it (there were three of them) for a good 15 minutes. It generally crawled around the open holes as if to somehow detect a target or to decide on its next move. Every few minutes, it would make a move and reverse itself (ovipositor first) into the hole. I suppose it then deposited her eggs. The parasitic behavior of species in this genus is diverse; eggs can be deposited on the larvae of a host, but also near it. Other behavior is to deposit them near or on the food supply of the host.<br />
<br />
The adult feeds on nectar, and you can see how its body is covered in it. In dutch, we call these insects &quot;hunger wasps&quot;. I first assumed this is related to the appetite of its larvae, which parasite both a host and its food supply. No, the name comes from the extremely thin waist (metasoma), which even for a parasitoid wasp is unusually thin.<br />
<br />
I&#039;m happy to see and learn about this species, as I appreciate its beauty. I&#039;m not terrible happy in it targeting bee populations, but I will let nature have its way.<br />
<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61278/gasteruption_jaculator_-_closeup_netherlands.html" title="Gasteruption jaculator - closeup, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/61278_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1589414410&Signature=ZnPv9SdfCUujdl%2FhBgndae9PCmY%3D" width="118" height="152" alt="Gasteruption jaculator - closeup, Netherlands Presumed species. A few days ago, I granted myself a 15 minute sunbath in the garden. But of course, even in such a rare moment of relaxation, the natural world called for my attention. The red on this insect caught my eye.<br />
<br />
It&#039;s sitting on our shed in which we store garden tools. The shed is poorly maintained and the wood has several holes in it which are thankfully used by several bee species and hover flies as a nest. Good, because I&#039;m employing several tactics in our garden to promote insect populations. <br />
<br />
Before grabbing the camera I first watched it (there were three of them) for a good 15 minutes. It generally crawled around the open holes as if to somehow detect a target or to decide on its next move. Every few minutes, it would make a move and reverse itself (ovipositor first) into the hole. I suppose it then deposited her eggs. The parasitic behavior of species in this genus is diverse; eggs can be deposited on the larvae of a host, but also near it. Other behavior is to deposit them near or on the food supply of the host.<br />
<br />
The adult feeds on nectar, and you can see how its body is covered in it. In dutch, we call these insects &quot;hunger wasps&quot;. I first assumed this is related to the appetite of its larvae, which parasite both a host and its food supply. No, the name comes from the extremely thin waist (metasoma), which even for a parasitoid wasp is unusually thin.<br />
<br />
I&#039;m happy to see and learn about this species, as I appreciate its beauty. I&#039;m not terrible happy in it targeting bee populations, but I will let nature have its way.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61277/gasteruption_jaculator_-_full_body_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61279/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61280/gasteruption_jaculator_-_head_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61281/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_closeup_netherlands.html Europe,Gasteruption jaculator,Heesch,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61279/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_netherlands.html" title="Gasteruption jaculator - top view, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/61279_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1589414410&Signature=KQQP1jWlptbzDzKvxlorrmxff%2FQ%3D" width="200" height="164" alt="Gasteruption jaculator - top view, Netherlands Presumed species. A few days ago, I granted myself a 15 minute sunbath in the garden. But of course, even in such a rare moment of relaxation, the natural world called for my attention. The red on this insect caught my eye.<br />
<br />
It&#039;s sitting on our shed in which we store garden tools. The shed is poorly maintained and the wood has several holes in it which are thankfully used by several bee species and hover flies as a nest. Good, because I&#039;m employing several tactics in our garden to promote insect populations. <br />
<br />
Before grabbing the camera I first watched it (there were three of them) for a good 15 minutes. It generally crawled around the open holes as if to somehow detect a target or to decide on its next move. Every few minutes, it would make a move and reverse itself (ovipositor first) into the hole. I suppose it then deposited her eggs. The parasitic behavior of species in this genus is diverse; eggs can be deposited on the larvae of a host, but also near it. Other behavior is to deposit them near or on the food supply of the host.<br />
<br />
The adult feeds on nectar, and you can see how its body is covered in it. In dutch, we call these insects &quot;hunger wasps&quot;. I first assumed this is related to the appetite of its larvae, which parasite both a host and its food supply. No, the name comes from the extremely thin waist (metasoma), which even for a parasitoid wasp is unusually thin.<br />
<br />
I&#039;m happy to see and learn about this species, as I appreciate its beauty. I&#039;m not terrible happy in it targeting bee populations, but I will let nature have its way.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61277/gasteruption_jaculator_-_full_body_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61278/gasteruption_jaculator_-_closeup_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61280/gasteruption_jaculator_-_head_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61281/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_closeup_netherlands.html Europe,Gasteruption jaculator,Heesch,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61280/gasteruption_jaculator_-_head_netherlands.html" title="Gasteruption jaculator - head, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/61280_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1589414410&Signature=Sof3ATs80vRa6jrphb5XtVj2x5o%3D" width="114" height="152" alt="Gasteruption jaculator - head, Netherlands Presumed species. A few days ago, I granted myself a 15 minute sunbath in the garden. But of course, even in such a rare moment of relaxation, the natural world called for my attention. The red on this insect caught my eye.<br />
<br />
It&#039;s sitting on our shed in which we store garden tools. The shed is poorly maintained and the wood has several holes in it which are thankfully used by several bee species and hover flies as a nest. Good, because I&#039;m employing several tactics in our garden to promote insect populations. <br />
<br />
Before grabbing the camera I first watched it (there were three of them) for a good 15 minutes. It generally crawled around the open holes as if to somehow detect a target or to decide on its next move. Every few minutes, it would make a move and reverse itself (ovipositor first) into the hole. I suppose it then deposited her eggs. The parasitic behavior of species in this genus is diverse; eggs can be deposited on the larvae of a host, but also near it. Other behavior is to deposit them near or on the food supply of the host.<br />
<br />
The adult feeds on nectar, and you can see how its body is covered in it. In dutch, we call these insects &quot;hunger wasps&quot;. I first assumed this is related to the appetite of its larvae, which parasite both a host and its food supply. No, the name comes from the extremely thin waist (metasoma), which even for a parasitoid wasp is unusually thin.<br />
<br />
I&#039;m happy to see and learn about this species, as I appreciate its beauty. I&#039;m not terrible happy in it targeting bee populations, but I will let nature have its way.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61277/gasteruption_jaculator_-_full_body_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61278/gasteruption_jaculator_-_closeup_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61279/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61281/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_closeup_netherlands.html Europe,Gasteruption jaculator,Heesch,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61281/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_closeup_netherlands.html" title="Gasteruption jaculator - top view closeup, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/61281_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1589414410&Signature=aObO%2F%2FP9t%2FD3xJoNyOI8KeXvqyk%3D" width="200" height="182" alt="Gasteruption jaculator - top view closeup, Netherlands Presumed species. A few days ago, I granted myself a 15 minute sunbath in the garden. But of course, even in such a rare moment of relaxation, the natural world called for my attention. The red on this insect caught my eye.<br />
<br />
It&#039;s sitting on our shed in which we store garden tools. The shed is poorly maintained and the wood has several holes in it which are thankfully used by several bee species and hover flies as a nest. Good, because I&#039;m employing several tactics in our garden to promote insect populations. <br />
<br />
Before grabbing the camera I first watched it (there were three of them) for a good 15 minutes. It generally crawled around the open holes as if to somehow detect a target or to decide on its next move. Every few minutes, it would make a move and reverse itself (ovipositor first) into the hole. I suppose it then deposited her eggs. The parasitic behavior of species in this genus is diverse; eggs can be deposited on the larvae of a host, but also near it. Other behavior is to deposit them near or on the food supply of the host.<br />
<br />
The adult feeds on nectar, and you can see how its body is covered in it. In dutch, we call these insects &quot;hunger wasps&quot;. I first assumed this is related to the appetite of its larvae, which parasite both a host and its food supply. No, the name comes from the extremely thin waist (metasoma), which even for a parasitoid wasp is unusually thin.<br />
<br />
I&#039;m happy to see and learn about this species, as I appreciate its beauty. I&#039;m not terrible happy in it targeting bee populations, but I will let nature have its way.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61277/gasteruption_jaculator_-_full_body_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61278/gasteruption_jaculator_-_closeup_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61279/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61280/gasteruption_jaculator_-_head_netherlands.html Europe,Gasteruption jaculator,Heesch,Netherlands,World" /></a></figure><br />
 Europe,Gasteruption jaculator,Heesch,Netherlands,World Click/tap to enlarge PromotedCountry intro

Gasteruption jaculator - full body view, Netherlands

Presumed species. A few days ago, I granted myself a 15 minute sunbath in the garden. But of course, even in such a rare moment of relaxation, the natural world called for my attention. The red on this insect caught my eye.

It's sitting on our shed in which we store garden tools. The shed is poorly maintained and the wood has several holes in it which are thankfully used by several bee species and hover flies as a nest. Good, because I'm employing several tactics in our garden to promote insect populations.

Before grabbing the camera I first watched it (there were three of them) for a good 15 minutes. It generally crawled around the open holes as if to somehow detect a target or to decide on its next move. Every few minutes, it would make a move and reverse itself (ovipositor first) into the hole. I suppose it then deposited her eggs. The parasitic behavior of species in this genus is diverse; eggs can be deposited on the larvae of a host, but also near it. Other behavior is to deposit them near or on the food supply of the host.

The adult feeds on nectar, and you can see how its body is covered in it. In dutch, we call these insects "hunger wasps". I first assumed this is related to the appetite of its larvae, which parasite both a host and its food supply. No, the name comes from the extremely thin waist (metasoma), which even for a parasitoid wasp is unusually thin.

I'm happy to see and learn about this species, as I appreciate its beauty. I'm not terrible happy in it targeting bee populations, but I will let nature have its way.

Gasteruption jaculator - closeup, Netherlands Presumed species. A few days ago, I granted myself a 15 minute sunbath in the garden. But of course, even in such a rare moment of relaxation, the natural world called for my attention. The red on this insect caught my eye.<br />
<br />
It's sitting on our shed in which we store garden tools. The shed is poorly maintained and the wood has several holes in it which are thankfully used by several bee species and hover flies as a nest. Good, because I'm employing several tactics in our garden to promote insect populations. <br />
<br />
Before grabbing the camera I first watched it (there were three of them) for a good 15 minutes. It generally crawled around the open holes as if to somehow detect a target or to decide on its next move. Every few minutes, it would make a move and reverse itself (ovipositor first) into the hole. I suppose it then deposited her eggs. The parasitic behavior of species in this genus is diverse; eggs can be deposited on the larvae of a host, but also near it. Other behavior is to deposit them near or on the food supply of the host.<br />
<br />
The adult feeds on nectar, and you can see how its body is covered in it. In dutch, we call these insects "hunger wasps". I first assumed this is related to the appetite of its larvae, which parasite both a host and its food supply. No, the name comes from the extremely thin waist (metasoma), which even for a parasitoid wasp is unusually thin.<br />
<br />
I'm happy to see and learn about this species, as I appreciate its beauty. I'm not terrible happy in it targeting bee populations, but I will let nature have its way.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61277/gasteruption_jaculator_-_full_body_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61279/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61280/gasteruption_jaculator_-_head_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61281/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_closeup_netherlands.html Europe,Gasteruption jaculator,Heesch,Netherlands,World

Gasteruption jaculator - top view, Netherlands Presumed species. A few days ago, I granted myself a 15 minute sunbath in the garden. But of course, even in such a rare moment of relaxation, the natural world called for my attention. The red on this insect caught my eye.<br />
<br />
It's sitting on our shed in which we store garden tools. The shed is poorly maintained and the wood has several holes in it which are thankfully used by several bee species and hover flies as a nest. Good, because I'm employing several tactics in our garden to promote insect populations. <br />
<br />
Before grabbing the camera I first watched it (there were three of them) for a good 15 minutes. It generally crawled around the open holes as if to somehow detect a target or to decide on its next move. Every few minutes, it would make a move and reverse itself (ovipositor first) into the hole. I suppose it then deposited her eggs. The parasitic behavior of species in this genus is diverse; eggs can be deposited on the larvae of a host, but also near it. Other behavior is to deposit them near or on the food supply of the host.<br />
<br />
The adult feeds on nectar, and you can see how its body is covered in it. In dutch, we call these insects "hunger wasps". I first assumed this is related to the appetite of its larvae, which parasite both a host and its food supply. No, the name comes from the extremely thin waist (metasoma), which even for a parasitoid wasp is unusually thin.<br />
<br />
I'm happy to see and learn about this species, as I appreciate its beauty. I'm not terrible happy in it targeting bee populations, but I will let nature have its way.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61277/gasteruption_jaculator_-_full_body_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61278/gasteruption_jaculator_-_closeup_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61280/gasteruption_jaculator_-_head_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61281/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_closeup_netherlands.html Europe,Gasteruption jaculator,Heesch,Netherlands,World

Gasteruption jaculator - head, Netherlands Presumed species. A few days ago, I granted myself a 15 minute sunbath in the garden. But of course, even in such a rare moment of relaxation, the natural world called for my attention. The red on this insect caught my eye.<br />
<br />
It's sitting on our shed in which we store garden tools. The shed is poorly maintained and the wood has several holes in it which are thankfully used by several bee species and hover flies as a nest. Good, because I'm employing several tactics in our garden to promote insect populations. <br />
<br />
Before grabbing the camera I first watched it (there were three of them) for a good 15 minutes. It generally crawled around the open holes as if to somehow detect a target or to decide on its next move. Every few minutes, it would make a move and reverse itself (ovipositor first) into the hole. I suppose it then deposited her eggs. The parasitic behavior of species in this genus is diverse; eggs can be deposited on the larvae of a host, but also near it. Other behavior is to deposit them near or on the food supply of the host.<br />
<br />
The adult feeds on nectar, and you can see how its body is covered in it. In dutch, we call these insects "hunger wasps". I first assumed this is related to the appetite of its larvae, which parasite both a host and its food supply. No, the name comes from the extremely thin waist (metasoma), which even for a parasitoid wasp is unusually thin.<br />
<br />
I'm happy to see and learn about this species, as I appreciate its beauty. I'm not terrible happy in it targeting bee populations, but I will let nature have its way.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61277/gasteruption_jaculator_-_full_body_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61278/gasteruption_jaculator_-_closeup_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61279/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61281/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_closeup_netherlands.html Europe,Gasteruption jaculator,Heesch,Netherlands,World

Gasteruption jaculator - top view closeup, Netherlands Presumed species. A few days ago, I granted myself a 15 minute sunbath in the garden. But of course, even in such a rare moment of relaxation, the natural world called for my attention. The red on this insect caught my eye.<br />
<br />
It's sitting on our shed in which we store garden tools. The shed is poorly maintained and the wood has several holes in it which are thankfully used by several bee species and hover flies as a nest. Good, because I'm employing several tactics in our garden to promote insect populations. <br />
<br />
Before grabbing the camera I first watched it (there were three of them) for a good 15 minutes. It generally crawled around the open holes as if to somehow detect a target or to decide on its next move. Every few minutes, it would make a move and reverse itself (ovipositor first) into the hole. I suppose it then deposited her eggs. The parasitic behavior of species in this genus is diverse; eggs can be deposited on the larvae of a host, but also near it. Other behavior is to deposit them near or on the food supply of the host.<br />
<br />
The adult feeds on nectar, and you can see how its body is covered in it. In dutch, we call these insects "hunger wasps". I first assumed this is related to the appetite of its larvae, which parasite both a host and its food supply. No, the name comes from the extremely thin waist (metasoma), which even for a parasitoid wasp is unusually thin.<br />
<br />
I'm happy to see and learn about this species, as I appreciate its beauty. I'm not terrible happy in it targeting bee populations, but I will let nature have its way.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61277/gasteruption_jaculator_-_full_body_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61278/gasteruption_jaculator_-_closeup_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61279/gasteruption_jaculator_-_top_view_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61280/gasteruption_jaculator_-_head_netherlands.html Europe,Gasteruption jaculator,Heesch,Netherlands,World

    comments (5)

  1. Very cool wasp with an even cooler name. I looked up the meaning and learned that “Gast comes from the Greek “gaster” meaning stomach, and eruption of course means to “issue forth suddenly and violently”. The word Jaculator comes from the Latin meaning a Roman javelin thrower. So there we have it – a javelin-like instrument that can issue forth something from inside the wasp.” Posted one year ago
    1. Awesome explanation of the name, thank you! Posted one year ago
      1. You're welcome! I had to find out the meaning and then couldn't not share :) Posted one year ago
  2. Cracking shot Ferdy, I'm back in Corfu and just seen one of these. Your image is much clearer than mine! Posted 8 months ago
    1. Thank you, Stuart. If I'm not mistaken, I believe you just donated to JD? Thank you so much friend! Posted 8 months ago

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''Gasteruption jaculator'' is a species belonging to the family Gasteruptiidae subfamily Gasteruptiinae.

Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 7, 2018. Captured Jun 4, 2018 18:33.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/13.0
  • 1/125s
  • ISO64
  • 105mm