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Leaf Bagworm This little home keeps the Leaf Case moth larva safe. The larva lives in a silken case, to which it attaches leaf or twigs as a covering. They feed on the leaves of many different plants and the leaves covering their bags therefore consists of different plant materials. <br />
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They can be found on most kinds of trees - this one seen on Metrosideros thomasii. The female adult is wingless and never leaves her case. The male is black in colour with transparent wings and dark antennae. <br />
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This delightful structure was just 10mm in height.<br />
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 Australia,Hermit Crab Caterpillar,Hyalarcta huebneri,Insect,Leaf Bagworm,Leaf Case Moth,Lepidoptera,Macro,Moth,Psychidae,arthropod,fauna,invertebrate Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Leaf Bagworm

This little home keeps the Leaf Case moth larva safe. The larva lives in a silken case, to which it attaches leaf or twigs as a covering. They feed on the leaves of many different plants and the leaves covering their bags therefore consists of different plant materials.

They can be found on most kinds of trees - this one seen on Metrosideros thomasii. The female adult is wingless and never leaves her case. The male is black in colour with transparent wings and dark antennae.

This delightful structure was just 10mm in height.

    comments (4)

  1. Awesome! Posted one year ago
  2. Fantastic! It’s amazing that they can walk around with the case on their backs! Posted one year ago
    1. I think we need to post a video of that here! Posted one year ago
      1. Yep! Check this one out:
        Posted one year ago

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Hyalarcta huebneri is a common casemoth (bagworm) found in south eastern Australia. It is usually seen in larval form in a case made of silk and the vegetative material most readily available, and is quite adaptable to various plant species. In early stages they exist head-down in the case but as they get larger they will invert and move around head-up.

Similar species: Moths And Butterflies
Species identified by Christine Young
View Ruth Spigelman's profile

By Ruth Spigelman

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 6, 2018. Captured Apr 22, 2018 11:26.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/11.0
  • 1/197s
  • ISO500
  • 100mm