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Telescopefish (Gigantura chuni) from the Gulf of Mexico between 1,500 and 1,200m depth. Telescopefish (Gigantura indica and G. chuni) are deepwater fishes with a spectacular appearance. The telescoping eyes might be used to track bioluminescent prey items in the darkness of the depths. Further evidence that these fishes eat bioluminescent prey items include a stomach with a black tissue lining. The function would be to conceal recently consumed prey items that might still be glowing, keeping the predator from becoming a prey item to larger fishes. The sharp and significant teeth undoubtedly subdue prey. One of the miraculous aspects to these species is that the larvae look nothing like the adults and a tremendous metamorphosis takes place. This individual was trawled from the Gulf of Mexico between 1,500 and 1,200m depth, 2016. Image courtesy of the DEEPEND project. Deep Sea,Deepsea,Gigantura chuni,Life in the dark Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Telescopefish (Gigantura chuni) from the Gulf of Mexico between 1,500 and 1,200m depth.

Telescopefish (Gigantura indica and G. chuni) are deepwater fishes with a spectacular appearance. The telescoping eyes might be used to track bioluminescent prey items in the darkness of the depths. Further evidence that these fishes eat bioluminescent prey items include a stomach with a black tissue lining. The function would be to conceal recently consumed prey items that might still be glowing, keeping the predator from becoming a prey item to larger fishes. The sharp and significant teeth undoubtedly subdue prey. One of the miraculous aspects to these species is that the larvae look nothing like the adults and a tremendous metamorphosis takes place. This individual was trawled from the Gulf of Mexico between 1,500 and 1,200m depth, 2016. Image courtesy of the DEEPEND project.

    comments (7)

  1. Dante, I was so hoping you would post this crazy species as that is how I found you! Absolutely mind blowing. Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
  2. That’s incredible!
    Posted one year ago
  3. Amazing and very scary!!
    Posted one year ago
  4. My goodness! Something to dream about tonight.
    Was the image taken at depth or near sea level?
    Posted one year ago
    1. The DEEPEND project is the source of the opportunities to photographically document the deep water wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico. We are examining the impact on this community by the Deep Water Horizon oil spill. Much of that work involves environmental toxicology since so much of the oil remains in the depths, where it was spilled. This requires research biologists to trawl for specimens and bring them to the surface so that samples can be checked for contaminants. Before that happens, I photograph everything we get so that we can try to expand on the biology and ecology of these species and make the most of the process. We use a MOCNESS system wherein a computer opens and closes the 6 nets in the unit at discrete depths - so we know exactly where each sample comes from. I shoot the specimens in aquaria I have modified for this process across the past 30 years. Much biology and ecology has already come from the work including new species descriptions and a much better understanding of what happens to a deep water community when a spill like this takes place - lots of publications on the way. Posted one year ago
  5. Fabulous! Thanks so much for sharing, cheers* Posted one year ago
  6. Absolutely fascinating. Posted one year ago

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Gigantura chuni is a telescope fish found mainly in the deep, tropical waters of the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans between 18°N-21°S. Larvae are commonly caught between 30-170 m and adults can be found between 500-1,500 m. It is also found in the Gulf of Mexico. In the eastern central Atlantic, this species is found between 20°N and 10°S including the Gulf of Guinea. There are published accounts of this species off of South Africa.

Similar species: Lizardfishes And Allies
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
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By Anotheca

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 29, 2018. Captured May 8, 2016 18:24.
  • SLT-A77V
  • f/18.0
  • 1/60s
  • ISO320
  • 100mm