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Hole Created by Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) These woodpeckers make impressive, often large, rectangular excavations in trees and rotting wood. They make these holes while in pursuit of carpenter ant tunnels, which is the woodpecker&rsquo;s primary food source. They also use their long, barbed tongues to extract beetle larvae or termites from the wood. <br />
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They are very loud birds that I often hear in the forest, but rarely see.  However, the signs that they have been there are unmistakable, as you can see in this picture. I&#039;m not sure what kind of tree this was, but it was a conifer - maybe Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis). Dryocopus,Dryocopus pileatus,Geotagged,Pileated Woodpecker,Spring,United States,excavation,pileated woodpecker hole,signs of wildlife,woodpecker hole Click/tap to enlarge

Hole Created by Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus)

These woodpeckers make impressive, often large, rectangular excavations in trees and rotting wood. They make these holes while in pursuit of carpenter ant tunnels, which is the woodpecker’s primary food source. They also use their long, barbed tongues to extract beetle larvae or termites from the wood.

They are very loud birds that I often hear in the forest, but rarely see. However, the signs that they have been there are unmistakable, as you can see in this picture. I'm not sure what kind of tree this was, but it was a conifer - maybe Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis).

    comments (4)

  1. Just thinking about this process gives me a headache. Posted 2 years ago
    1. Woodpeckers definitely have some amazing features! Thick neck muscles and extra eyelids to stop their eyeballs from popping out are definitely cool. But, in my opinion, even more interesting is that their incredible bodies are actually able to redirect the energy released from a collision. So, when they strike a tree, most of that impact energy is somehow diverted from their head to their body. Thus very little energy goes to their heads in order to protect their brains. And, whatever energy does go to their heads, is quickly converted to heat, which is why woodpeckers take frequent breaks from pecking: to dissipate the heat. Posted 2 years ago
      1. So cool, I've read about the brain protection before, but did not know about the eyelids! Posted 2 years ago
        1. The pressure from pounding on the tree would otherwise build in their heads and cause their eyeballs to pop right out :-0 Posted 2 years ago

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By Christine Young

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Uploaded Apr 26, 2018. Captured Apr 13, 2018 13:13 in 80 Main St, Sharon, CT 06069, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/2.8
  • 1/128s
  • ISO640
  • 100mm