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Common Yarrow The leaves of this plant are evenly distributed along the stem and have varying degrees of hairiness, appearing almost feathery or fern-like. The inflorescence, which contains flowers that are white to pink in color, is produced in a flat-topped capitulum cluster. <br />
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Often considered to be an aggressive weed, it was originally introduced to America during colonial times, and has since naturalized throughout the U.S. Yarrow has many interesting and beneficial uses: It has been widely used in food, tea, and traditional medicine. Additionally, several types of cavity-nesting birds line their nests with yarrow, and experimental data suggests that adding yarrow to nests may inhibit the growth of parasites. The essential oil of yarrow may be a beneficial larvacide as it has been show to kill the larvae of Aedes albopictus Asian Tiger Mosquito).  Achillea millefolium,Common Yarrow,Common yarrow,Geotagged,Summer,United States,flower,pink,pink flowers,wildflower,wildflowers,yarrow Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Common Yarrow

The leaves of this plant are evenly distributed along the stem and have varying degrees of hairiness, appearing almost feathery or fern-like. The inflorescence, which contains flowers that are white to pink in color, is produced in a flat-topped capitulum cluster.

Often considered to be an aggressive weed, it was originally introduced to America during colonial times, and has since naturalized throughout the U.S. Yarrow has many interesting and beneficial uses: It has been widely used in food, tea, and traditional medicine. Additionally, several types of cavity-nesting birds line their nests with yarrow, and experimental data suggests that adding yarrow to nests may inhibit the growth of parasites. The essential oil of yarrow may be a beneficial larvacide as it has been show to kill the larvae of Aedes albopictus Asian Tiger Mosquito).

    comments (3)

  1. Wonderful, heart-shaped almost! Posted one year ago
  2. Oh wow! Is this a variety or a subspecies by any chance? The common yarrow here is an off-white! Posted one year ago
    1. I think it must be a variety of common yarrow. They are usually white here too. I found it on the edge of a meadow in a rural area, but the meadow bordered backyards. Posted one year ago

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''Achillea millefolium'', known commonly as yarrow /ˈjæroʊ/ or common yarrow, is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Asia, Europe, and North America. In New Mexico and southern Colorado, it is called ''plumajillo'' from its leaf shape and texture. In antiquity, yarrow was known as ''herbal militaris'', for its use in stanching the flow of blood from wounds. Other common names for this species include gordaldo, nosebleed plant,.. more

Similar species: Asterales
Species identified by Christine Young
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By Christine Young

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Uploaded Apr 9, 2018. Captured Jul 4, 2016 14:56 in 4 Lake Ave, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866, USA.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/2.8
  • 1/166s
  • ISO160
  • 100mm