JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Shrimp of the Woods This is the unaborted form of Entoloma abortivum. The caps were dry, bald, white-gray, and had a slightly inrolled margin. The gills were white-gray, close, and attached to the stem. The stem was finely hairy, had an enlarged base, and white basal mycelium.<br />
<br />
The aborted form of this species looks like an irregular blob that is whitish brown outside with white and pink areas inside. For years, it was thought that the aborted forms of Entoloma developed in response to being parasitized by Armillaria species. But, research indicates that the relationship is the other way around: Entoloma is the parasite and the aborted structures are actually Armillaria Entoloma,Entoloma abortivum,Geotagged,Shrimp of the Woods,Summer,United States,fungi,fungus,mushroom,mushrooms,white,white mushrooms Click/tap to enlarge Species introCountry intro

Shrimp of the Woods

This is the unaborted form of Entoloma abortivum. The caps were dry, bald, white-gray, and had a slightly inrolled margin. The gills were white-gray, close, and attached to the stem. The stem was finely hairy, had an enlarged base, and white basal mycelium.

The aborted form of this species looks like an irregular blob that is whitish brown outside with white and pink areas inside. For years, it was thought that the aborted forms of Entoloma developed in response to being parasitized by Armillaria species. But, research indicates that the relationship is the other way around: Entoloma is the parasite and the aborted structures are actually Armillaria

    comments (2)

  1. With bonus robberfly? Posted one year ago
    1. Haha, yes. I wish I had gotten a shot of the fly, but I didn't even notice it until putting the pics on my computer. I think it might be a wood gnat (Anisopodidae), but am not really sure. I have also wondered why an animal abandoned the mushroom on the right after only a couple bites! Posted one year ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

''Entoloma abortive'', commonly known as the aborted entoloma or shrimp of the woods, is an edible mushroom in the Entolomataceae family of fungi. First named ''Clitopilus abortivus'' by Miles Joseph Berkeley and Moses Ashley Curtis, it was given its current name by the Dutch mycologist Marinus Anton Donk in 1949.

It was believed that the honey mushroom, ''Armillaria mellea'', was parasitizing the entoloma. But research has indicated that the inverse may be true - the entoloma may be.. more

Similar species: Gilled Mushrooms
Species identified by Christine Young
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Mar 16, 2018. Captured Sep 21, 2017 10:57 in 3353 VT-30, Dorset, VT 05251, USA.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/4.0
  • 1/64s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm