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British Soldiers Lichen British Soldiers grow very slowly - only 1-2 millimeters each year. A lichen is not just one organism, but is made of fungus and algae, living together to form a new organism. The fungus in British Soldiers is called Cladonia cristatella. The algae is Trebouxia erici. Because lichens take the name of the fungus part of the relationship, British Soldiers are classified as Cladonia cristatella. <br />
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This is my favorite lichen! Unfortunately, I spotted this one midday, in full sun, and it was growing on a post situated in the middle of a tick-infested meadow. But, still, I was happy to see it! British Soldiers,British Soldiers Lichen,British soldier lichen,Cladonia cristatella,Geotagged,Spring,Trebouxia erici,United States,cladonia,lichen,symbiosis Click/tap to enlarge

British Soldiers Lichen

British Soldiers grow very slowly - only 1-2 millimeters each year. A lichen is not just one organism, but is made of fungus and algae, living together to form a new organism. The fungus in British Soldiers is called Cladonia cristatella. The algae is Trebouxia erici. Because lichens take the name of the fungus part of the relationship, British Soldiers are classified as Cladonia cristatella.

This is my favorite lichen! Unfortunately, I spotted this one midday, in full sun, and it was growing on a post situated in the middle of a tick-infested meadow. But, still, I was happy to see it!

    comments (3)

  1. I really miss fungi photography. Given how stationary they are, they give a lot of control over composition. I missed several seasons in a row here as we keep traveling abroad at the very peak of the season because on the other end of the world, it's dry season :)

    I was wondering if given your remark on daylight you're also experimenting with remote flash? I've made a start with these experiments a few years ago, example:

    Gnome town A cluster of hundreds of Plicaturopsis crispa fungi cluster on a fallen tree. This is a staged day light photo where I underexposed natural light, used weak front-flash, and a remote strong bottom flash. In post processing, I reduced the color temperature. Autumn,Fall,Heeswijk,Netherlands,Plicaturopsis crispa

    Yet never developed this skill any further. It's quite fun though.
    Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
  2. I love shooting fungi because as you said, they don’t move. Plus, they have such amazing variety, textures, colors, etc. But, DOF is definitely a struggle with fungi. I have been experimenting with light a lot lately - not a remote flash yet, but trying little tricks like diffusing my flash, not using a flash, using a headlamp at various angles, etc. I don’t like the harshness that my camera’s flash has because it washes out the color and textures. I tend to like vibrant colors, but also really love the soft tones, both of which I lose with a flash. I’ll be researching using a remote flash next though and am always looking to improve and expand my methods with whatever equipment I have at the time. Posted one year ago
    1. Getting this shot was particularly frustrating because I spotted them from a distance and it was midday, so the sun was so harsh and garish. I rarely find this lichen though outside of Maine, so it was still a great find for me! Posted one year ago

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''Cladonia cristatella'', commonly known as the British soldier lichen, is a fruticose lichen belonging to the family Cladoniaceae. The species was first described scientifically by the American Botanist Edward Tuckerman in 1858.

Similar species: Lecanorales
Species identified by Christine Young
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Mar 15, 2018. Captured Jun 18, 2016 23:40 in Main St S, Southbury, CT 06488, USA.
  • Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
  • f/20.0
  • 1/250s
  • ISO400
  • 300mm