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Monarch Butterfly Bright orange wings with black and white markings. The outer edge of the wings has a thick black border. Within the black border are white spots. The upper corner of the top set of wings has orange spots. The body of the monarch is black. This monarch is a male, which can be distinguished from the females because the males have two clearly visible black spots on their hindwings.  Monarch metamorphosis from egg to adult takes as little as 25 days, However, it is estimated that fewer than 10% of monarch eggs and caterpillars survive because they are so vulnerable to weather, parasites, and disease. Monarchs are harbingers of environmental change, and it seems that their numbers may be continuing to decline. Butterfly,Danaus plexippus,Geotagged,Monarch,Monarch Butterfly,Monarch butterfly,Summer,United States Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Monarch Butterfly

Bright orange wings with black and white markings. The outer edge of the wings has a thick black border. Within the black border are white spots. The upper corner of the top set of wings has orange spots. The body of the monarch is black. This monarch is a male, which can be distinguished from the females because the males have two clearly visible black spots on their hindwings. Monarch metamorphosis from egg to adult takes as little as 25 days, However, it is estimated that fewer than 10% of monarch eggs and caterpillars survive because they are so vulnerable to weather, parasites, and disease. Monarchs are harbingers of environmental change, and it seems that their numbers may be continuing to decline.

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  1. From today's Facebook JungleDragon post:

    "The iconic Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is one of the most recognizable butterfly species in the Americas, where their range extends from Canada to South America. As precious pollinators and harbingers of environmental change, monarchs contribute to the health of our planet. And, they perform one of the most spectacular feats in the insect world! Monarch butterflies embark on an incredible migration that brings millions of them south to California and Mexico each winter. Then, in spring, they fly north again. A single monarch can travel thousands of miles! They are amazingly accurate in their trajectory, knowing the correct direction to migrate and following the same path that their ancestors traveled, even though they have never made the journey before.

    Monarchs are experiencing significant threats to their survival. Over the past 20 years, monarch populations have declined at least 90%. The reasons are complicated, but include climate change and habitat loss. Monarchs are having a difficult time adjusting to life in a climate-stressed world. Climate change causes unexpected and unseasonal storms, excessive rain, and severe temperature fluctuations. These extremes are proving deadly to monarchs. Furthermore, although monarch butterflies feed on the nectar from a variety of wildflowers, they only lay their eggs on certain types of milkweed. Pesticides kill the milkweed that the monarchs depend upon for survival. Urbanization, deforestation, large-scale farms, and industrialization have further resulted in significant milkweed and native plant loss as development paves at least two million acres of land in the United States each year. This degree of habitat loss is a significant problem as it is entwined with the loss of milkweed and the potential loss of all creatures that were once living on that land, such as monarchs. So, when faced with habitat loss, harsh weather, pesticides, and urbanization, the odds seem stacked against monarchs. Their desperate struggle for survival is a warning to us about the potentially irreversible changes that the earth is facing. Think of monarchs as harbingers that need us to give them a reason to hope. Conservation efforts are actively trying to reverse the trajectory of this beloved species and they could use everyone's support and help! {Monarch caterpillar, chrysalis, and butterfly photos taken in Connecticut, USA by JungleDragon moderator, Christine Young} #JungleDragon"
    Posted one month ago

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The monarch butterfly or simply monarch is a milkweed butterfly in the family Nymphalidae. Other common names depending on region include milkweed, common tiger, wanderer, and black veined brown. It may be the most familiar North American butterfly, and is considered an iconic pollinator species. Its wings feature an easily recognizable black, orange, and white pattern, with a wingspan of 8.9–10.2 cm The viceroy butterfly is similar in color and pattern, but is markedly smaller and has an extra.. more

Similar species: Moths And Butterflies
Species identified by Christine Young
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By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jan 11, 2018. Captured Aug 21, 2017 14:37 in 80 Main St, Sharon, CT 06069, USA.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/6.3
  • 1/256s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm