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Hyla gratiosa Green native tree frog with a yellow (diffuse) line running from mouth to hind leg. Black to brown spots are abundant on dorsal side (along with some yellow speckling). Banding present on hind legs as well. Hyla gratiosa is a nocturnal amphibian that spends its days in the treetops. During harsh weather conditions (like heat waves or drought) it practices aestivation, burying itself underground in order to preserve water and maintain body temperature. H. gratiosa&#039;s chorus call can sound like the sound of barking dogs at a distance, thus the common name.<br />
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Habitat:<br />
This frog was found in an outdoor observatory late at night. The surrounding area is an organic farm and pine/hardwood forest.<br />
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Notes:<br />
The white powder present on this frog&#039;s legs was from diatomaceous earth that was spread around the edges of the walls (for pest control). Barking tree frog,Fall,Geotagged,Hyla gratiosa,United States,amphibia,amphibian,barking tree frog,hyla,hyla gratiosa,tree frog Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Hyla gratiosa

Green native tree frog with a yellow (diffuse) line running from mouth to hind leg. Black to brown spots are abundant on dorsal side (along with some yellow speckling). Banding present on hind legs as well. Hyla gratiosa is a nocturnal amphibian that spends its days in the treetops. During harsh weather conditions (like heat waves or drought) it practices aestivation, burying itself underground in order to preserve water and maintain body temperature. H. gratiosa's chorus call can sound like the sound of barking dogs at a distance, thus the common name.

Habitat:
This frog was found in an outdoor observatory late at night. The surrounding area is an organic farm and pine/hardwood forest.

Notes:
The white powder present on this frog's legs was from diatomaceous earth that was spread around the edges of the walls (for pest control).

    comments (6)

  1. hi Lisa, welcome to JungleDragon and a happy new year!
    I see you already figured out species identification. The other thing that is important is location. You can either just set the country (set country button) or set a precise location (geotag button). Knowing the location of the observation is important, as this way we map observations to a country but we also use it to calculate country species intros.

    Hope this helps, feel free to ask for help if needed.
    Posted one year ago
  2. Yes, I just figured that out. Sorry for the delay! I love the Geolocation map! I always save this important detail in my observations, so no worries! Posted one year ago
    1. No worries, Lisa. You pretty much now know how to use the site. It's photo + species + location. You're already sharing correctly in a single day, usually it takes far longer. Some more tips below:

      Should you have a camera or photo editing software that captures geotag info inside the actual JPEG, JungleDragon will detect that, in that case you don't have to manually geotag on the site.

      Small gotcha on commenting: you were responding to my comment but I won't get a notification of that unless you use the "reply" link below a comment.

      Finally, given your location and interest in fungi, I'm obliged to tell you about @morpheme:

      morphememorpheme

      She has some enormous collections of observations:
      https://www.jungledragon.com/user/1590/lists

      Figured you may be interested in that. Enjoy the site, we're really happy to have you and ask if anything is unclear.

      Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
      1. I appreciate the help! I'm getting there.

        Thank you for the tip! I will have to follow her!
        Posted one year ago
  3. Absolutely love that little frog. Welcome. Posted one year ago
    1. Thank you, Mark. It was adorable! Posted one year ago

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''Hyla gratiosa'' is a species of tree frog endemic to the southeastern United States.

Similar species: Frogs
Species identified by Lisa Kimmerling
View Lisa Kimmerling's profile

By Lisa Kimmerling

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jan 1, 2018. Captured Oct 13, 2017 21:36 in 686-696 Higginbotham Rd, Collinsville, AL 35961, USA.
  • Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
  • f/4.0
  • 1/60s
  • ISO400
  • 60mm