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Sheep lamb laying in the grass (texelaar as far as i know) Hey guys, here is my photo of a sheep lamb close to my house. i dont know for shure wich sheep species it is but as far as i know it is a texelaar lamb. that is a dutch sheep species that is braid and used for meat. altleast for what i know.<br />
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i also want to ask what you guys think about the composition and other things of the photo as i am still learning and trying to get better. it was a challenge to get the composition right as the lamb was laying in a direction i couldnt get to, so i hang over a fence in order to get it atleast good enough to make this.  Domestic sheep,Geotagged,Netherlands,Ovis aries,Spring Click/tap to enlarge

Sheep lamb laying in the grass (texelaar as far as i know)

Hey guys, here is my photo of a sheep lamb close to my house. i dont know for shure wich sheep species it is but as far as i know it is a texelaar lamb. that is a dutch sheep species that is braid and used for meat. altleast for what i know.

i also want to ask what you guys think about the composition and other things of the photo as i am still learning and trying to get better. it was a challenge to get the composition right as the lamb was laying in a direction i couldnt get to, so i hang over a fence in order to get it atleast good enough to make this.

    comments (7)

  1. Rudolph, regarding the species, almost all "farm" sheep are considered the same species. From the photos you can see how they can differ a lot in appearance:
    https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/82/photos

    ...yet all are the same species, similar to how there are hundreds of breeds/races of dog, yet all are the same species. On this site, only the species is recognized by the system, not the breed or race. Hope that explains it.

    Regarding the photo, I think it is quite good. Good aspects are the the subject itself which is adorable and the look back in the camera is well timed. It's also showing the entire body and the shot is very sharp, showing a lot of detail.

    I would normally end there, but since you are so eager for feedback, some ideas to make something good even better:

    1) I can tell from the photo that you took it at the middle of the day. This type of light tends to be harsh, showing hard shadows. Light during sunrise or sunset is softer, comes from the side, and has a warmer feeling to it, which would fit this subject. Example deer photo showing such soft light:

    Red deer stags Red deer stags at Lyme Park, Peak District, UK Cervus elaphus,Geotagged,Red deer,United Kingdom,Winter


    2) Regarding composition, nothing wrong with this photo, but it is a human perspective. You can clearly see that you're staring down on the lamb. My personal preference (and it's just an opinion) is that getting at eye level with an animal often leads to better results. But this definitely depends on the situation.

    Hope this helps, and keep up the good work.
    Posted 4 years ago
    1. Thanks for the comment Ferdy, okay now i know how jungledragon works when it comes to species and breeds.

      and also thanks for the feedback. i took the photo indeed at the middle of the day. thanks for the tip to do this kind of things more during sunrise or sunset.

      and i indeed should be more on eye level. especially with this kind of shots. i will also use this tip.

      thanks for all the tips and compliments. they are very usefull and i will use them with future shots.
      Posted 4 years ago, modified 4 years ago
      1. Glad to help. Note that I'm only an amateur myself, and don't always follow my own advise. Sunrise and sunset light takes a lot of effort and getting up early or staying later in the field, so I do often take the easier way.

        Power tip: JungleDragon allows you to plan for the best daylight period:
        https://www.jungledragon.com/daylight

        In the bottom, pick the date you want to go outside, then drag the slider to find the times of the "golden hours", which are the perfect hours for soft light. Be sure to pick your location first, although it can detect it if you share your location. It can even detect the angle of the light. Landscape photographers use such tools to prepare, but there's no reason you cannot use it for any other subjects.

        Getting at eye level I consider a universal tip, it applies to anything. Also for flowers and fungi, it often leads to more interesting shots. So get ready to crawl ;)
        Posted 4 years ago
      2. One more thing I forgot to mention: an extra advantage of photographing during sunrise or sunset is that this is the moment where almost all wildlife is the most active, in particular mammals and birds. This seems to be true across the world. The opposite is also true, the midday hours most animals go into hiding or take it easy, except for insects. Posted 4 years ago
  2. wow, didnt even knew that jungledragon had such an tool. it is very handy, thank you.

    now that we are on the subject of light, is having soft light something that is better for all shots, or is it more specific. like it is bettrer for animals for instance. i also did an close up shot of fruit blossem yesterday in bright daylight, altough i had the sun in my back. and that seems to have come out pretty good. altough i am going back to that place hopefully today to take it again, but with a different composition, because i think that may come out better. and i will do that also with softer lighting to see if that also is better for close ups and such. i am very well in the learning fase with those things. but i am very happy with those tips. sorry if some questions may sound dumb, thats the way i learn the best. and sometimes things arent clear right away for me.

    i like crawling if that gets me a good shot, altough my body isnt that felxible. but that will be alright.

    Thanks again for the tips!
    Posted 4 years ago
    1. Sorry, did not see your new response earlier. It's usually best to use the "reply" link to directly reply to a comment, that way I will get a notification.

      Regarding any tip in photography, you should see it as a guideline, and not rules. For example, a general advise is to not shoot against the light (have the light in your back), but it's very well possible to make beautiful and unique shots against the light. So my general advise is to experiment and break rules, but to break rules, you must first know them.

      Similarly, soft light is not always better, but in my opinion, it often is, for landscapes, mammals and birds. It's not only about the light being softer and more pleasing. That's an important reason, but there's another. Check out this elephant:

      big_white_bull A big bull covered with the dry white dust from a nxai pan waterhole. African bush elephant,Botswana,Geotagged,Loxodonta africana,Summer

      Taken with the sun straight above it (midday), you can see that the subject is quite flat and has hard shadows. The total is a very hard contrast between light and dark. Check out this elephant one hour before sunset:

      Master of Kaudulla - checkpoint As described in my earlier photo...<br />
<br />
http://www.jungledragon.com/image/24646/master_of_kaudulla.html<br />
<br />
...this large dominant bull inspects every female that passes the water to check if she's ready for him. This group of youngsters could pass, but any adult female first had to stop at the checkpoint. Asia,Elephas maximus maximus,Kaudulla,Sri Lanka,Sri Lankan elephant

      The light has a warmer color and comes from the side (in dutch: strijklicht). Most people would find that more pleasing, but there's another advantage: much more depth. Where before we had only white and black with little in between, here we see a subject in many shades of light and dark.

      Besides these visual reasons, there's practical reasons for early or late light: it simply is when wildlife is most active. There's a million exceptions to think of, as said, it's only a guideline, but there's good reasons for this preference.

      And please don't excuse yourself, your questions are not dumb. You're open to learning, asking and experimenting. That's the way to improve!
      Posted 4 years ago, modified 4 years ago
      1. no problem, i didnt see i wasnt making a reply until i posted it. so my mistake, i meant to do it as an reply, but didnt click right, so made a new comment.

        okay, thanks for the tips and also the explanation of it. it becomes clearer now. and i can use those tips very well.
        the second photo is indeed alot easier for the eye, and more beautiful. and indeed, the guidelines are there for a reason, but sometimes it works to think outside the guidelines.

        thanks, i will take that as a compliment. i do my best, and try to learn as much as i can.
        Posted yesterday

        i just saw, i made the same mistake. i now put it as a reply.
        Posted 4 years ago

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Sheep are quadrupedal, ruminant mammals typically kept as livestock. Like all ruminants, sheep are members of the order Artiodactyla, the even-toed ungulates. Although the name "sheep" applies to many species in the genus ''Ovis'', in everyday usage it almost always refers to ''Ovis aries''. Numbering a little over one billion, domestic sheep are also the most numerous species of sheep.

Sheep are most likely descended from the wild mouflon of Europe and Asia. One of the earliest animals.. more

Similar species: Even-toed Ungulates
Species identified by morpheme
View Rudolph van Harn's profile

By Rudolph van Harn

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 18, 2017. Captured Apr 9, 2017 13:26 in Brakenweide 5, 1679 VE Midwoud, Netherlands.
  • Canon EOS 760D
  • f/4.5
  • 1/800s
  • ISO100
  • 35mm