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Mottled Wood Owl This was taken in the buffer zone of the Tadoba. I had taken some images the day before (of both mother and kid), but the lighting was not favorable (very harsh), so I couldn&#039;t do much even after trying different settings. Our plans got changed unexpected and we had to leave the day after, which means I can now go for another safari. Since, it was a last minute decision I couldn&#039;t get the core zone, and as being a weekend all other buffer zones were booked except for this one where it is believed that the tiger sightings are almost null. <br />
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So had decided to visit the same place once again where this owl was found. However, this time only child was sitting on the tree. Though it was giving some good pose, the light was still not favorable. At one point of time I stopped taking it&#039;s pictures as it was giving the same pose again and again. I kept my camera aside and thinking about how differently I can take it&#039;s pic. Meanwhile, the thought struck in my mind about it&#039;s mother. After exploring the  surroundings finally I found her. Luckily, she was sitting in the lower branch, light was better, but she was facing the opposite direction. Set all my settings and waiting for her to turn. And after a long wait, there you go it turned. Just for once. And then again towards the opposite direction. I was satisfied with my image and went away. <br />
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Oh and by the way, we were able to spot a tigress and it was there with us for two minutes in a zone where it is believed the tiger sightings are a hoax. :-) Geotagged,India,Mottled Wood Owl,Owl,Spring,Strix ocellata,Tadoba,mottled wood owl Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Mottled Wood Owl

This was taken in the buffer zone of the Tadoba. I had taken some images the day before (of both mother and kid), but the lighting was not favorable (very harsh), so I couldn't do much even after trying different settings. Our plans got changed unexpected and we had to leave the day after, which means I can now go for another safari. Since, it was a last minute decision I couldn't get the core zone, and as being a weekend all other buffer zones were booked except for this one where it is believed that the tiger sightings are almost null.

So had decided to visit the same place once again where this owl was found. However, this time only child was sitting on the tree. Though it was giving some good pose, the light was still not favorable. At one point of time I stopped taking it's pictures as it was giving the same pose again and again. I kept my camera aside and thinking about how differently I can take it's pic. Meanwhile, the thought struck in my mind about it's mother. After exploring the surroundings finally I found her. Luckily, she was sitting in the lower branch, light was better, but she was facing the opposite direction. Set all my settings and waiting for her to turn. And after a long wait, there you go it turned. Just for once. And then again towards the opposite direction. I was satisfied with my image and went away.

Oh and by the way, we were able to spot a tigress and it was there with us for two minutes in a zone where it is believed the tiger sightings are a hoax. :-)

    comments (4)

  1. A top post, Uday! Love the subtle camouflage and its a great species intro! Thanks also for sharing the story and for having the patience. Posted 5 years ago
    1. Thanks Fredy. Yeah.. patience pays and I need to improve even further. :-) Posted 5 years ago
  2. Hey Uday, awesome pic.
    I'm from India too.
    Where was this captured at?

    By the way which zoom lens do you use?
    Posted 5 years ago
    1. Hi Bhanu,

      This was taken in one of the buffer zones of Tadoba. I have used 100-400mm IS.
      Posted 5 years ago

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The mottled wood owl is a species of large owl found in India. They are found in gardens and thin deciduous forests adjacent to dry thorn forests or farmland. They are easily detected by their distinctive tremulous eerie calls at dawn and dusk. The characteristic call is a duet of the male and female while other notes include a low hoot and a screech. Their large size, lack of "ear" tufts and the concentric barring on the face make them easy to identify.

Similar species: Owls
Species identified by Uday Kiran
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By Uday Kiran

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 9, 2017. Captured Apr 1, 2017 17:06 in Unnamed Road, Moharli, Maharashtra 442404, India.
  • Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • f/5.6
  • 1/640s
  • ISO1000
  • 400mm