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Wildest of horses Ode to the war horses. As if they wouldn&#039;t rather be somewhere else in times forlorn. But anyway, the biggest horse in England.<br />
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Lying just below an Iron Age hill fort is the oldest of several white horses carved in Wiltshire. It is often claimed to commemorate King Alfred&#039;s victory at the Battle of E&eth;andun in 878.<br />
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It is a sight in Devon, one horse of many more (7) in the surrounding neighborhoods.<br />
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These horses are &#039;built&#039; from the white chalk that forms the hills. In ages long past the grass and humus was cut away to show the white profile you see now.  Domestic horse,Equus ferus caballus,Geotagged,United Kingdom Click/tap to enlarge

Wildest of horses

Ode to the war horses. As if they wouldn't rather be somewhere else in times forlorn. But anyway, the biggest horse in England.

Lying just below an Iron Age hill fort is the oldest of several white horses carved in Wiltshire. It is often claimed to commemorate King Alfred's victory at the Battle of Eðandun in 878.

It is a sight in Devon, one horse of many more (7) in the surrounding neighborhoods.

These horses are 'built' from the white chalk that forms the hills. In ages long past the grass and humus was cut away to show the white profile you see now.

    comments (6)

  1. (ahum, is this even allowed? It is a depiction of an animal and it has wild adventures attached to it:)) Beautiful landscaping too, there. Posted 8 years ago
    1. Although I like the story and history lesson I would say that this is slightly off-topic for jungledragon. The picture is not good enough to call it a landscape picture and a white siluette isn't an animal either.
      The picture is not bad, but this kind of pictures is not the direction I would like jungledragon to go in the future.
      Posted 8 years ago, modified 8 years ago
    2. Regarding policies, Jungledragon takes into account the intend of the poster. For example, we occassionally see spammers joining and posting clearly offtopic photos that are immediately removed.

      I consider this a wildlife-related photo and knowing and valueing you as a fine community member, I think it is a valid photo. It may not be a "core" wildlife photo, but I value people over processes. Plus, its an interesting photo, has an educational story and it simply is a beautiful landscape. So no worries.
      Posted 8 years ago
      1. Phew, I knew I'd get some criticism by posting it, but I liked it too while digging my archives. Thx for the support, Ferdy. Joost, I do understand your point of view, thank you for explaining it to me. Posted 8 years ago
  2. Ps did you zoom into the map? It even shows up in Google Maps. Posted 8 years ago
    1. Wow, that's double cool! Didn't realize it was that big. Posted 8 years ago

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The horse is one of two extant subspecies of ''Equus ferus''. It is an odd-toed ungulate mammal belonging to the taxonomic family Equidae. The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature into the large, single-toed animal of today. Humans began to domesticate horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC.

Similar species: Odd-toed Ungulates
Species identified by Ludo Sak
View Ludo Sak's profile

By Ludo Sak

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 16, 2012. Captured Aug 1, 2011 15:33 in 4 Port Way, Bratton, Wiltshire BA13, UK.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/7.1
  • 1/500s
  • ISO100
  • 85mm