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Juvenile Cooper's hawk Enjoying a meal of pigeon in a tree near my home. It's quite small for a hawk. It looks to be not even twice the size of the pigeon that it's caught. Differentiated from a juvenile sharp shinned hawk by the brighter streaking and barring on the chest, thicker feet and legs and tail feathers of differing lengths. Accipiter cooperii,Coopers Hawk,Fall,Geotagged,United States Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Juvenile Cooper's hawk

Enjoying a meal of pigeon in a tree near my home. It's quite small for a hawk. It looks to be not even twice the size of the pigeon that it's caught. Differentiated from a juvenile sharp shinned hawk by the brighter streaking and barring on the chest, thicker feet and legs and tail feathers of differing lengths.

    comments (7)

  1. Super clear shot! Posted 2 years ago
    1. I'm quite pleased with this one. She (maybe... the females are bigger and this one seems pretty large for the species) sat out in that tree for at least 2 hours eating her pigeon, so I was able to observe and wait. The sun peeped out for just a few minutes and I was super lucky that she also turned to face the side at just the right time too. Most of the time I watched she was facing away from the sun, so it was either get photos of her back or do them backlit, which didn't look nearly as good. Posted 2 years ago
      1. That's right, there is a lot right about this photo: the light, the pose, the depth, the composition...all working together making a top shot. Well done! Posted 2 years ago
  2. perfectly executed! very good overall morpheme!! Posted 2 years ago
  3. Superb!! Posted 2 years ago
  4. From today's JungleDragon Facebook post:
    "The Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) is a bird of prey with a range that extends from southern Canada to northern Mexico. It has a slate back and a reddish-brown-streaked chest. It additionally has short rounded wings, a long tail, and a wingspan of 62-90 cm. Its body is adapted for quick navigation through the underbrush and crowded tangle of dense forests. It is here that the Cooper's Hawk ambushes small birds, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals. Additionally, this species exhibits reversed sexual dimorphism, with females being around 1/3 larger than males.

    Cooper's Hawks were initially referred to as "Chicken Hawks" by early American colonists as they had a habit of snatching up poultry from farmsteads. As a result, this species came under heavy fire for the years leading up through the early 1950s. To add insult to injury, heavy usage of DDT in the 1940s and 1950, extensive logging operations, and human development led populations to even further decline. In 1980, it was listed as a threatened species in Wisconsin, and it was thought to be on track for extinction. However, this tenacious bird had no intention of going down the path to obsolescence. With its habitat dwindling, the Cooper's Hawk turned its eye on areas inhabited by humans-- and found that cityscapes could also provide a suitable hunting ground. Small birds attracted to bird feeders became easy pickings for the Cooper's Hawk. It is also thought that the plethora of pigeons, starlings, doves, and sparrows found within cities has allowed the once-threatened hawk to replenish its populations. {Spotted in Washington, USA by JungleDragon moderator, morpheme} #JungleDragon "
    Posted 11 months ago, modified 11 months ago
    1. Great shot morpheme! And, so interesting! Posted 11 months ago

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Cooper's Hawk is a medium-sized hawk native to the North American continent and found from Southern Canada to Northern Mexico. As in many birds of prey, the male is smaller than the female. The birds found east of the Mississippi River tend to be larger on average than the birds found to the west.

Similar species: Falcons
Species identified by morpheme
View morpheme's profile

By morpheme

All rights reserved
Uploaded Nov 29, 2016. Captured Nov 29, 2016 13:50 in 1612 22nd Ave, Seattle, WA 98122, USA.
  • X-E2
  • f/8.0
  • 1/500s
  • ISO800
  • 560mm